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1000 Names of Vishnu
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From the Back of the Book

Most of the world's major religions celebrate the Holy Names of God. Christians have commentaries like St. Bernard's Jewish mystics made the Divine Names the focus of meditation. Muslims have the Most Excellent Names. Holy, Merciful, Compassionate. Truth, the One-such names appear in all religions, emphasizing that however we worship, the Lord is one and the same.

In India, one of the most popular of these litanies is the Thousand Names of Vishnu. Vishnu is God the Preserver, the sustainer of life, worshipped by millions in his incarnations as Rama and Krishna.

"Om I worship Lord Vishnu, who has become the universe and pervades all. Lord of past, present and future. He is being and the essence of all beings: he is the pure and supreme Self in all. His face is everywhere…..

In a thousand ways, the Thousand Names a single message: the Lord is everything, everywhere. His names evoke the qualities that elevate our lives: forgiveness, beauty, tenderness, compassion, love.

Eknath Easwaran comments on a fraction of the Thousand Names and what each one means in a daily living. This is a book for daily inspiration, full of personal reminders of what it means to see God in the faces and events of everyday life.

About the Author

Eknath Easwaran is respected around the world as one of the great spiritual teachers. He was Professor of English Literature at the University of Nagpur, India and an established writer, when he came to the United States on the Fulbright exchange program in 1959. As Founder and Director of the Blue Mountain Center of Meditation and the Nilgiri Press, he taught the classics of world mysticism and the practice of meditation from 1960 till his death in 1999.

Introduction

Most of the world's major religions have a tradition celebrating the Holy Names of God. Muslims have the Most Excellent Names; Christians have litanies and commentaries like that of Saint Bernard. Jewish tradition preserves several lists of the Divine Names, which Jewish mystics have made the focus of meditation. The Holy, the Merciful, the Compassionate; Truth; the One: these are names which appear in each religion, emphasizing that however we call him-or, as in some parts of my native India, her-the Lord is always the same.

In Hinduism, one of the most popular of these litanies is Sri Vishnu Sahasra-nama Stotrum, the "Thousand Names of Vishnu." Since no concept can ever describe the Infinite, Hindus believe that the Lord has many forms-Shiva, Ganesha, the Divine Mother, and so on- shaped, so to say, by the inner needs of those who worship him. The Thousand Names praises God as Vishnu, the preserver and sustainer of life, worshipped all over India in his incarnations as Krishna and Rama.

I must have heard the Thousand Names recited a thousand times while I was growing up. My grand- mother, my spiritual teacher, would place a lighted oil lamp in front of the image of Sri Krishna. Then an uncle who was a Sanskrit scholar would chant the names of the Lord one by one, with the sacred word Om before each name and the word namah after it. "Om Vishnave namah!" It means "I bow to Lord Vishnu," "I worship Lord Vishnu," much like the Christian or Jewish "Blessed art thou, O Lord." With each name my uncle would take a fresh lotus petal, touch it to his heart, and offer it at 'the feet of the Lord. This is japam, repetition of the mantram or Holy Name, as it has been practiced throughout India for centuries.

I was not a very devotional boy, and I have to confess that rituals meant little to me. But after an hour of this kind of recitation at dawn with my family, the Thousand Names used to echo in my mind for the rest of the day. Even without reflection, the meaning went in. The Lord is everything, everywhere; he dwells in every heart:

Om! I worship Lord Vishnu,
Who has become the universe and pervades all.
Lord of past, present, and future,
He has made and supports all that is.
He is being and the essence of all beings;
He is the pure and supreme Self in all.

He is all, and the beginning of all things.
He is existence, its cause and its support,
He is the origin and the power.
He is the Lord.

He is the One from which creation flows.
His heads are a multitude, yet he is the Self in all.
His eyes and feet cannot be numbered.
Many and mighty are his forms.

His soul is revealed in light; as fire he burns.
He is the rays of the moon and the light of the sun,
His forms are many, but he is hidden.
He has hundreds of forms, hundreds of faces;
His face is everywhere …..

Even for a child, then, the Thousand Names were a constant reminder that there is a spark, of divinity in everyone. It prompted us to be a little more considerate, a little more kind, a little more selfless with those around us-which, I suppose, is just the-effect these rituals are supposed to achieve. Filling your mind with the thought of God is not primarily an esthetic experience. It has a very practical purpose; for what we think of constantly, we see wherever we look.

Later, as an adult, I discovered that ritual is not necessary to achieve this goal. The most effective form of japam, in fact, is the silent repetition of the Holy Name or mantram in the mind: Jesus, Jesus, or Rama, Rama, or Allah, Allah, or whatever formula has been sanctified by tradition. This form of prayer has been taught in every major religion, and in my experience it is second only to meditation as a tool for transforming consciousness.

In the following pages, I have chosen a fraction of the Thousand Names and added a practical commentary on what each name means in daily living. These comments are based on the eightfold program for spiritual growth which I have followed in my own life and have taught in this country for more than twenty-five years. Meditation is the heart of this program, as it is of my life; so I refer to it constantly in the pages that follow. What I mean by "meditation," and how I differentiate it from the repetition of a mantram, are explained in the brief summary of my program at the end of this book.

The thousand names

The "Thousand Names of Vishnu" comes from the Mahabharata, an ancient epic poem which is a vast treasury of Hindu legend and literature-including the best known and most universal of the Hindu scriptures, the Bhagavad Gita. In this epic setting, the Thousand Names is given to the philosopher-prince Yudhishthira by a great sage named Bhishma. The prince asks his teacher a question that must find an echo in every heart: "How can I find joy that will always be with me, satisfying my deepest desires?" Bhishma's reply is to reveal the Thousand Names, with the assurance that if they can be repeated in the deepest reaches I of consciousness, this continuous "prayer of the heart" will fill the mind with joy•

Each of these names carries significance. Some refer to the power and beauty of the Lord; others recall some incident in the vast mythology of Vishnu, whose compassion sustains the world. As Vishnu, "he who is everywhere," God has entered into all creatures as their innermost consciousness. He upholds the cosmos from with- in, as its ruling principle, and establishes and embodies dharma, the indivisible unity of life.

In Indian mysticism, which has a genius for clothing the Infinite in human form, Vishnu embodies the source of beauty and order in creation. His body is the dark blue of limitless space, and the galaxies hang from his neck like innumerable strands of jewels. His four arms show that he holds sway over the four quarters of the world. His are the qualities that draw forth love: forgiveness, beauty, and a tender compassion for all creatures.

Vishnu's image is found in temples, shrines, and homes all over India. Usually he is represented as a handsome man of divine radiance who holds in four hands the symbols of power and beauty. A necklace of precious gems adorns his neck. When he travels he is carried by the cosmic eagle, Garuda, or rides a chariot drawn by four spirited horses. In rest he reclines upon the serpent called Infinity, floating in the cosmic waters in perfect peace, dreaming the dream of the world. Though benevolent, he is noted for a mischievous sense of fun. He is universally kind, always approachable, understanding, and serene. The imagery surrounding Vishnu is of light and peace.

Vishnu is also God the protector, who rescues humanity in time of need and supports and strengthens us from within when other resources fail. He is infinite, but from time to time throughout history his love for his creation is so great that he allows himself to be born as a human being to show the world a way out of evil and suffering. Rama and Krishna are the best loved of these divine in- carnations. Krishna, in fact, is so completely identified with Vishnu that the two can be regarded as one and the same-as I do occasionally in the pages that follow.

The name Krishna is said to come from the root krish, meaning to attract. Krishna is God with a human face, and his enchanting smile attracts all things. He is usually portrayed as a youth, in the years when he was a cowherd boy in the idyllic village of Vrindavan. A peacock feather shimmers with beauty in his long hair, which flows around his face like the blue-black rain clouds that blot out the tropical sky during the monsoon. With his body gracefully bent and his arms holding a flute to his lips, he plays an irresistible song. He wears yellow silk, and a garland of wildflowers swings from his neck; on his chest dances a sacred jewel.

This is how Krishna is painted by his devotees as an incarnation of Vishnu. The imagery is specific, but the beauty and compelling attraction of this Lord of Love is universal. Krishna is the spark of divinity in every heart, constantly calling us to return to him. As long as we are alienated from the Lord within, we will be restless and unfulfilled; for this divine spark is our deepest nature, the innermost core of our being. The Lord of Love, present in every human heart, is our real Self.

Swami Ramdas, a very appealing saint of South India whom my wife and I had the privilege of meeting many years ago, used to say that the name of the Lord is God. This is a dramatic way of emphasizing that when you realize the full significance of the Holy Name, you have realized the unity of life. All your desires will have merged in the love of God, whose presence you see in everyone around you. In this sense the Holy Name is a key that can gradually unlock the prison of separateness which confines and isolates every human heart. It can lead us to the discovery of our true personality, eternal, immutable, infinite, and pure.

In Indian mysticism the Lord is said to be sat yam, shivam, sundaram: the source of all truth, all goodness, and all beauty. When we open ourselves to this source of glory within, a part of it pours into our life. But in order to do this, we have to get ourselves out of the way. We have to learn to defy and eventually to extinguish all the passions by which we make ourselves separate from others: anger, greed, lust, self-will.

This is a tremendous challenge, but repetition of the Holy Name is an infinitely powerful ally. As the mind fills with the thought of God, the heart becomes pure; for as Bhishma says in the Mahabharata, the very name of the Lord is a purifying, transforming influence. Anger gradually turns into compassion, greed into generosity, lust into love.

All this Bhishma explains to Prince Yudhishthira, so that he can hear each Holy Name with full understanding of its significance. Then, having prepared Yudhishthira to receive them, Bhishma says, "Now, O prince, I shall recite the Thousand Names. Listen carefully, and they will remove fear and evil from your life."

CONTENTS

 

Introduction 11
He who is Everything 19
He who is Everywhere 21
Maker of All Beings 24
The Support of All Creatures 26
The Supreme Self 27
The Self in Every Creature 28
The One 29
The Many 30
Maker of All Things 32
The Essence of All Beings 33
The Eternal Law 36
Lord of Past, Present and Future 38
The Immeasurable 40
Peace 42
Giver of Peace 43
The Eternal 47
Happy 48
The Unitive State 50
Spirit 53
The Supreme Self 54
He who has Beautiful Hair 55
The Thief 56
Patience 57
Lover of his Devotees 61
Who Makes Love Increase 63
The Destroyer 65
He who is invoked in the Act of Sacrifice 68
Abundant 69
Water Lily 71
Jasmine 72
He who wears Garlands of Forest Flowers 74
The Uplifter 76
All knowing 78
He who Never Sleeps 80
Whose Face is Everywhere 82
Rosy-eyed 83
The Supreme Blessing 84
The Self in All 85
That 88
Who has no Form 90
The immortal Craftsman 91
Free from Sorrow 93
He who nips wrong Actions in the Bud 95
The Purifier 97
The Energy of Life 100
Beyond Thought 103
Who has all the Weapons of Battle 104
Protector 106
Who Enjoys the Nectar of immortality 107
Beauty 108
Ornament 110
Destroyer of Sorrow 112
The Poet 113
Holder of the Wheel of the Cosmos 115
Wielder of the Mace 117
Who Carries a Conch Horn 120
Bearer of the Lotus 122
Maker and Destroyer of Fear 124
Answerer of Prayers 126
Giver of Wealth 129
Punishment 132
Lord of War 134
The Seven-Tongued 136
To whom Are Offered Seven Kinds of Fuel 138
Wielder of the Bow of horn 141
Will 143
Beautiful 147
The Cowherd Boy 149
Stealer of Hearts 151
Charioteer 154
Sustainer of Life 155
The Lotus Navel 156
Lotus-eyed 158
Big-eyed 160
The Witness 161
All-Seeing 163
Bringer of Tears 165
Full 168
Who caries Us Across 171
The Grand Father 172
Sacrifice 174
The Auspicious 178
Destroyer of Evil 180
The Unconquered 182
Who brings Sacrifice of Fruition 184
Good Works 185
The Place of Sacrifice 187
Freedom from Self-will 189
Whose Thread is Good 191
Who Keeps Expanding his Web 193
Destroyer of Sin 194
Immortal 196
Free from Craving 198
The Supreme Magician 200
Whose Work is Complete 202
Lovable 204
Whose Mind is Full of wealth 206
He who Attracts 207
Truth 210
Approachable 213
The Shining One 215
Full of Glory 217
Destroyer of Good Fortune 220
Bringer of Joy 222
Child of the Infinite 224
Good Fortune 226
Enduring 227
Who Brings Good from Suffering 228
Whose Thoughts Are True 230
Reality 233
Unreality 235
The Supreme Path 237
Joy 238
Bearer of the Bow 240
Self-control 242
Whom we Desire 243
King of Death 245
Freedom 247
Kindness 248
Invincible 252
Resolute 253
Irresolute 254
The Lawgiver 255
The Tree of Life 256
All 259
Destroyer of Evil 263
The Inexhaustible Treasure 264
Being 265
The Highway of the Free 267
Support 268
Lord of the World 269
The Son of Man 270
The Supreme Godhead 272
The Manifestation of Brahman 274
Maker of Reality 275
The Creator 277
Who Makes Reality Increase 279
Wisdom 281
Knower of Reality 282
Desire 284
Destroyer of Selfish Craving 286
Spiritual Teacher 289
The Holy Name 292
Thousand Name of Vishnu 295
An Eight-step Program 313
Glossary 319

Sample Pages

















1000 Names of Vishnu

Item Code:
IDG898
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2012
ISBN:
9788172245818
Language:
English
Size:
8.5" X 5.5"
Pages:
326
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 320 gms
Price:
$19.00   Shipping Free
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From the Back of the Book

Most of the world's major religions celebrate the Holy Names of God. Christians have commentaries like St. Bernard's Jewish mystics made the Divine Names the focus of meditation. Muslims have the Most Excellent Names. Holy, Merciful, Compassionate. Truth, the One-such names appear in all religions, emphasizing that however we worship, the Lord is one and the same.

In India, one of the most popular of these litanies is the Thousand Names of Vishnu. Vishnu is God the Preserver, the sustainer of life, worshipped by millions in his incarnations as Rama and Krishna.

"Om I worship Lord Vishnu, who has become the universe and pervades all. Lord of past, present and future. He is being and the essence of all beings: he is the pure and supreme Self in all. His face is everywhere…..

In a thousand ways, the Thousand Names a single message: the Lord is everything, everywhere. His names evoke the qualities that elevate our lives: forgiveness, beauty, tenderness, compassion, love.

Eknath Easwaran comments on a fraction of the Thousand Names and what each one means in a daily living. This is a book for daily inspiration, full of personal reminders of what it means to see God in the faces and events of everyday life.

About the Author

Eknath Easwaran is respected around the world as one of the great spiritual teachers. He was Professor of English Literature at the University of Nagpur, India and an established writer, when he came to the United States on the Fulbright exchange program in 1959. As Founder and Director of the Blue Mountain Center of Meditation and the Nilgiri Press, he taught the classics of world mysticism and the practice of meditation from 1960 till his death in 1999.

Introduction

Most of the world's major religions have a tradition celebrating the Holy Names of God. Muslims have the Most Excellent Names; Christians have litanies and commentaries like that of Saint Bernard. Jewish tradition preserves several lists of the Divine Names, which Jewish mystics have made the focus of meditation. The Holy, the Merciful, the Compassionate; Truth; the One: these are names which appear in each religion, emphasizing that however we call him-or, as in some parts of my native India, her-the Lord is always the same.

In Hinduism, one of the most popular of these litanies is Sri Vishnu Sahasra-nama Stotrum, the "Thousand Names of Vishnu." Since no concept can ever describe the Infinite, Hindus believe that the Lord has many forms-Shiva, Ganesha, the Divine Mother, and so on- shaped, so to say, by the inner needs of those who worship him. The Thousand Names praises God as Vishnu, the preserver and sustainer of life, worshipped all over India in his incarnations as Krishna and Rama.

I must have heard the Thousand Names recited a thousand times while I was growing up. My grand- mother, my spiritual teacher, would place a lighted oil lamp in front of the image of Sri Krishna. Then an uncle who was a Sanskrit scholar would chant the names of the Lord one by one, with the sacred word Om before each name and the word namah after it. "Om Vishnave namah!" It means "I bow to Lord Vishnu," "I worship Lord Vishnu," much like the Christian or Jewish "Blessed art thou, O Lord." With each name my uncle would take a fresh lotus petal, touch it to his heart, and offer it at 'the feet of the Lord. This is japam, repetition of the mantram or Holy Name, as it has been practiced throughout India for centuries.

I was not a very devotional boy, and I have to confess that rituals meant little to me. But after an hour of this kind of recitation at dawn with my family, the Thousand Names used to echo in my mind for the rest of the day. Even without reflection, the meaning went in. The Lord is everything, everywhere; he dwells in every heart:

Om! I worship Lord Vishnu,
Who has become the universe and pervades all.
Lord of past, present, and future,
He has made and supports all that is.
He is being and the essence of all beings;
He is the pure and supreme Self in all.

He is all, and the beginning of all things.
He is existence, its cause and its support,
He is the origin and the power.
He is the Lord.

He is the One from which creation flows.
His heads are a multitude, yet he is the Self in all.
His eyes and feet cannot be numbered.
Many and mighty are his forms.

His soul is revealed in light; as fire he burns.
He is the rays of the moon and the light of the sun,
His forms are many, but he is hidden.
He has hundreds of forms, hundreds of faces;
His face is everywhere …..

Even for a child, then, the Thousand Names were a constant reminder that there is a spark, of divinity in everyone. It prompted us to be a little more considerate, a little more kind, a little more selfless with those around us-which, I suppose, is just the-effect these rituals are supposed to achieve. Filling your mind with the thought of God is not primarily an esthetic experience. It has a very practical purpose; for what we think of constantly, we see wherever we look.

Later, as an adult, I discovered that ritual is not necessary to achieve this goal. The most effective form of japam, in fact, is the silent repetition of the Holy Name or mantram in the mind: Jesus, Jesus, or Rama, Rama, or Allah, Allah, or whatever formula has been sanctified by tradition. This form of prayer has been taught in every major religion, and in my experience it is second only to meditation as a tool for transforming consciousness.

In the following pages, I have chosen a fraction of the Thousand Names and added a practical commentary on what each name means in daily living. These comments are based on the eightfold program for spiritual growth which I have followed in my own life and have taught in this country for more than twenty-five years. Meditation is the heart of this program, as it is of my life; so I refer to it constantly in the pages that follow. What I mean by "meditation," and how I differentiate it from the repetition of a mantram, are explained in the brief summary of my program at the end of this book.

The thousand names

The "Thousand Names of Vishnu" comes from the Mahabharata, an ancient epic poem which is a vast treasury of Hindu legend and literature-including the best known and most universal of the Hindu scriptures, the Bhagavad Gita. In this epic setting, the Thousand Names is given to the philosopher-prince Yudhishthira by a great sage named Bhishma. The prince asks his teacher a question that must find an echo in every heart: "How can I find joy that will always be with me, satisfying my deepest desires?" Bhishma's reply is to reveal the Thousand Names, with the assurance that if they can be repeated in the deepest reaches I of consciousness, this continuous "prayer of the heart" will fill the mind with joy•

Each of these names carries significance. Some refer to the power and beauty of the Lord; others recall some incident in the vast mythology of Vishnu, whose compassion sustains the world. As Vishnu, "he who is everywhere," God has entered into all creatures as their innermost consciousness. He upholds the cosmos from with- in, as its ruling principle, and establishes and embodies dharma, the indivisible unity of life.

In Indian mysticism, which has a genius for clothing the Infinite in human form, Vishnu embodies the source of beauty and order in creation. His body is the dark blue of limitless space, and the galaxies hang from his neck like innumerable strands of jewels. His four arms show that he holds sway over the four quarters of the world. His are the qualities that draw forth love: forgiveness, beauty, and a tender compassion for all creatures.

Vishnu's image is found in temples, shrines, and homes all over India. Usually he is represented as a handsome man of divine radiance who holds in four hands the symbols of power and beauty. A necklace of precious gems adorns his neck. When he travels he is carried by the cosmic eagle, Garuda, or rides a chariot drawn by four spirited horses. In rest he reclines upon the serpent called Infinity, floating in the cosmic waters in perfect peace, dreaming the dream of the world. Though benevolent, he is noted for a mischievous sense of fun. He is universally kind, always approachable, understanding, and serene. The imagery surrounding Vishnu is of light and peace.

Vishnu is also God the protector, who rescues humanity in time of need and supports and strengthens us from within when other resources fail. He is infinite, but from time to time throughout history his love for his creation is so great that he allows himself to be born as a human being to show the world a way out of evil and suffering. Rama and Krishna are the best loved of these divine in- carnations. Krishna, in fact, is so completely identified with Vishnu that the two can be regarded as one and the same-as I do occasionally in the pages that follow.

The name Krishna is said to come from the root krish, meaning to attract. Krishna is God with a human face, and his enchanting smile attracts all things. He is usually portrayed as a youth, in the years when he was a cowherd boy in the idyllic village of Vrindavan. A peacock feather shimmers with beauty in his long hair, which flows around his face like the blue-black rain clouds that blot out the tropical sky during the monsoon. With his body gracefully bent and his arms holding a flute to his lips, he plays an irresistible song. He wears yellow silk, and a garland of wildflowers swings from his neck; on his chest dances a sacred jewel.

This is how Krishna is painted by his devotees as an incarnation of Vishnu. The imagery is specific, but the beauty and compelling attraction of this Lord of Love is universal. Krishna is the spark of divinity in every heart, constantly calling us to return to him. As long as we are alienated from the Lord within, we will be restless and unfulfilled; for this divine spark is our deepest nature, the innermost core of our being. The Lord of Love, present in every human heart, is our real Self.

Swami Ramdas, a very appealing saint of South India whom my wife and I had the privilege of meeting many years ago, used to say that the name of the Lord is God. This is a dramatic way of emphasizing that when you realize the full significance of the Holy Name, you have realized the unity of life. All your desires will have merged in the love of God, whose presence you see in everyone around you. In this sense the Holy Name is a key that can gradually unlock the prison of separateness which confines and isolates every human heart. It can lead us to the discovery of our true personality, eternal, immutable, infinite, and pure.

In Indian mysticism the Lord is said to be sat yam, shivam, sundaram: the source of all truth, all goodness, and all beauty. When we open ourselves to this source of glory within, a part of it pours into our life. But in order to do this, we have to get ourselves out of the way. We have to learn to defy and eventually to extinguish all the passions by which we make ourselves separate from others: anger, greed, lust, self-will.

This is a tremendous challenge, but repetition of the Holy Name is an infinitely powerful ally. As the mind fills with the thought of God, the heart becomes pure; for as Bhishma says in the Mahabharata, the very name of the Lord is a purifying, transforming influence. Anger gradually turns into compassion, greed into generosity, lust into love.

All this Bhishma explains to Prince Yudhishthira, so that he can hear each Holy Name with full understanding of its significance. Then, having prepared Yudhishthira to receive them, Bhishma says, "Now, O prince, I shall recite the Thousand Names. Listen carefully, and they will remove fear and evil from your life."

CONTENTS

 

Introduction 11
He who is Everything 19
He who is Everywhere 21
Maker of All Beings 24
The Support of All Creatures 26
The Supreme Self 27
The Self in Every Creature 28
The One 29
The Many 30
Maker of All Things 32
The Essence of All Beings 33
The Eternal Law 36
Lord of Past, Present and Future 38
The Immeasurable 40
Peace 42
Giver of Peace 43
The Eternal 47
Happy 48
The Unitive State 50
Spirit 53
The Supreme Self 54
He who has Beautiful Hair 55
The Thief 56
Patience 57
Lover of his Devotees 61
Who Makes Love Increase 63
The Destroyer 65
He who is invoked in the Act of Sacrifice 68
Abundant 69
Water Lily 71
Jasmine 72
He who wears Garlands of Forest Flowers 74
The Uplifter 76
All knowing 78
He who Never Sleeps 80
Whose Face is Everywhere 82
Rosy-eyed 83
The Supreme Blessing 84
The Self in All 85
That 88
Who has no Form 90
The immortal Craftsman 91
Free from Sorrow 93
He who nips wrong Actions in the Bud 95
The Purifier 97
The Energy of Life 100
Beyond Thought 103
Who has all the Weapons of Battle 104
Protector 106
Who Enjoys the Nectar of immortality 107
Beauty 108
Ornament 110
Destroyer of Sorrow 112
The Poet 113
Holder of the Wheel of the Cosmos 115
Wielder of the Mace 117
Who Carries a Conch Horn 120
Bearer of the Lotus 122
Maker and Destroyer of Fear 124
Answerer of Prayers 126
Giver of Wealth 129
Punishment 132
Lord of War 134
The Seven-Tongued 136
To whom Are Offered Seven Kinds of Fuel 138
Wielder of the Bow of horn 141
Will 143
Beautiful 147
The Cowherd Boy 149
Stealer of Hearts 151
Charioteer 154
Sustainer of Life 155
The Lotus Navel 156
Lotus-eyed 158
Big-eyed 160
The Witness 161
All-Seeing 163
Bringer of Tears 165
Full 168
Who caries Us Across 171
The Grand Father 172
Sacrifice 174
The Auspicious 178
Destroyer of Evil 180
The Unconquered 182
Who brings Sacrifice of Fruition 184
Good Works 185
The Place of Sacrifice 187
Freedom from Self-will 189
Whose Thread is Good 191
Who Keeps Expanding his Web 193
Destroyer of Sin 194
Immortal 196
Free from Craving 198
The Supreme Magician 200
Whose Work is Complete 202
Lovable 204
Whose Mind is Full of wealth 206
He who Attracts 207
Truth 210
Approachable 213
The Shining One 215
Full of Glory 217
Destroyer of Good Fortune 220
Bringer of Joy 222
Child of the Infinite 224
Good Fortune 226
Enduring 227
Who Brings Good from Suffering 228
Whose Thoughts Are True 230
Reality 233
Unreality 235
The Supreme Path 237
Joy 238
Bearer of the Bow 240
Self-control 242
Whom we Desire 243
King of Death 245
Freedom 247
Kindness 248
Invincible 252
Resolute 253
Irresolute 254
The Lawgiver 255
The Tree of Life 256
All 259
Destroyer of Evil 263
The Inexhaustible Treasure 264
Being 265
The Highway of the Free 267
Support 268
Lord of the World 269
The Son of Man 270
The Supreme Godhead 272
The Manifestation of Brahman 274
Maker of Reality 275
The Creator 277
Who Makes Reality Increase 279
Wisdom 281
Knower of Reality 282
Desire 284
Destroyer of Selfish Craving 286
Spiritual Teacher 289
The Holy Name 292
Thousand Name of Vishnu 295
An Eight-step Program 313
Glossary 319

Sample Pages

















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THANK YOU SO MUCH for your kind generosity! This golden-brass statue of Padmasambhava will receive a place of honor in our home and remind us every day to practice the dharma and to be better persons. We deeply appreciate your excellent packing of even the largest and heaviest sculptures as well as the fast delivery you provide. Every sculpture we have purchased from you over the years has arrived in perfect condition. Our entire house is filled with treasures from Exotic India, but we always have room for one more!
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The altar arrived today. Really beautiful. Thank you
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The statue arrived today fully intact. It is beautiful.
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