Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Hindu > The Bhagavad Gita
Displaying 3308 of 7183         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
The Bhagavad Gita
Pages from the book
The Bhagavad Gita
Look Inside the Book
Description
About the Book

‘The Lord's Song '-is a sacred scripture revered by millions all over the world. It contains priceless teachings which have stood the test of time. This translation by Annie Besant has run into many editions and continues to be a source of inspiration and understanding.

About the Author

Annie Besant(1847-1933) was President of the Theosophical Society from 1907 to 1933. She inspired thousands of men and women all over the world by her great qualities of mind and heart, her selfless service to humanity and her teaching. She was an outstanding orator, a champion of human freedom, an educationist, reformer and author. She also worked unremittingly for the spiritual, cultural and political renaissance of India which she loved as her ‘Spiritual Motherland.'

Preface

Among the priceless teachings that may be found in the great Hindu poem of the Mahabharata, there is none so rare and precious as this, 'The Lord's Song'. Since it fell from the divine lips of Shri Krishna on the field of battle and stilled the surging emotions of his disciple and friend, how many troubled hearts has it quieted and strengthened, how many weary souls has it led to Him! It is meant to lift the aspirant from the lower levels of renunciation, where objects are renounced, to the loftier heights where desires are dead, and where the Yogi dwells in calm and ceaseless contemplation, while his body and mind are actively employed in discharging the duties, that fall to his lot in life.

That the spiritual man need not be a recluse, that union with the divine Life may be achieved and maintained in the midst of worldly affairs, that the obstacles to that union lie not outside us but within us-such is the central lesson of the BHAGAVAD GITA.

It is a scripture of Yoga: now Yoga is literally union, and it means harmony with the divine Law, the becoming one with the divine Life, by the subdual of all outward- going energies. To reach this, balance must be gained, equilibrium, so that the self, joined to the Self, shall not be affected by pleasure or pain, desire or aversion, or any of the 'pairs of opposites' between which untrained selves swing backwards and for- wards. Moderation is therefore the keynote of the GITA, and the harmonizing of all the constituents of man, till they vibrate in perfect attunement with the One, the Supreme Self. This is the aim the disciple is to set before him. He must learn not to be attracted by the attractive, nor repelled by the repellent, but must see both as marifestations of the one Lord, so that they may be lessons for his guidance, not fetters for his bondage. In the midst of turmoil he must rest in the Lord of Peace, discharging every duty to the fullest, not because he seeks the results of his actions, but because it is his duty to perform them. His heart is an altar, love to his Lord the flame burningupon it; all his acts, physical and mental, are sacrifices, offered on the altar; and once offered, he has with them no further concern.

As though to make the lesson more impressive, it was given on a field of battle. Arjuna, the warrior prince, was to vindicate his brother's title, to destroy a usurper who was oppressing the land; it was his. duty as prince, as warrior, to fight for the deliverance of his nation and to restore order and peace. To make the contest more bitter, loved comrades and friends stood on both sides, wringing his heart with personal anguish, and making a conflict of duties as well as physical strife. Could he slay those to whom he owed love and duty, and trample on ties of kindred? To break family ties was a sin; to leave the people in cruel bondage was a sin; where was the right way? Justice must be done, else law would be disregarded; but how slay without sin? The answer is the burden of the book: Have no personal interest in the event; carry out the duty Imposed by the position in life, realize that Ishvara, at once Lord and Law, is the doer, working out the mighty evolution that ends in bliss and peace; be identified with Him by devotion, and then perform duty as duty, fighting without passion or desire, without anger or hatred; thus activity forges no bonds, Yoga is accomplished, and the soul is free.

Such is the obvious teaching of this sacred book. But, as all the acts of an Avatara are symbolical, we may pass from the outer to the inner planes, and see in the fight of Kurukshetra the battlefield of the soul and in the sons of Dhritarashtra, enemies it meets in its progress; Arjuna becomes the type of the struggling soul of the disciple, and Shri Krishna is the Logos of the soul. Thus the teaching of the ancient battlefield gives guidance in all later days, and trains the aspiring soul in treading the steep and thorny path that leads to peace. To all such souls in East and West tome these divine lessons, for the path is one, though it has many names, and all souls seek the same goal, though they may not realize their unity, In order to preserve the precision of the Sanskrit, a few technical terms have been given in the original in footnotes; Manas is the mind, both in the lower mental processes in which it is swayed by the senses, by passions and emotions, and in the higher processes of reasoning; Buddhi is the faculty above the ratiocinating mind, and is the 'Pure Reason, exercising the discriminative faculty of intuition, of spiritual discernment, If these original words are not known to the reader, the BHAGAVAD-GITA loses much of its practical value as a treatise on Yoga, and the would-be learner becomes confused, The epithets applied to Shri Krishna and Arjuna-the variety of which is so characteristic of Sanskrit conversation -are for the most part left untranslated, as being musical they thus add to the literary charm, whereas the genius of English is so different from that of Sanskrit, that the many- footed epithets become sometimes almost grotesque in translation.Nmaes derived from that of an ancestor, as Partha, meaning the son of Pritha, Kaunteya, meaning the son of Kunti, are used in one form or the other, according to the rhythm of the sentence. One other trifling matter, which is yet not trifling if it aids the student: when Atma means the One Self, the SELF of all, it is printed in small capitals; where it means the lower, the personal self, it is printed in ordinary type; this is done because there is sometimes a play on the word, and it is difficult for an untrained reader to follow the meaning without some such assistance. The word Brahman, the ONE, the Supreme, is throughout translated ‘THE ENTERNAL’. The word'Deva', literally 'Shining One', is thus translated throughout. The use of the western word 'God' alike for 'Brahman' and for the 'Devas' is most misleading; the Hindu never uses the one for the other, and never blurs the unity of the Supreme by the multiplicity of ministering Intelligences.

My wish, in adding this translation to those already before the public, was to preserve the spirit of the original, especially in its deeply devotional tone; while at the same time giving an accurate translation , reflecting the strength and the terseness of the Sanskrit. In order that mistakes, due to my imperfect knowledge, might be corrected, the first and second editions of this translation passed through the hands of one or other of the following gentlemen -friends of mine .at Benares-to whom I here tender my grateful acknowledgements: Babus Prarnada Das Mitra, Ganganath Jha, Kali Charan Mitra, and Upendranath Basu. A few of the notes are also due to them. In the third and fourth editions I have also been much helped by Babu Bhagavan Das, to whom I add my cordial thanks.

Contents

Dedicationv
Prefacexi
Discourse
IThe Yoga of Despondency of Arjuna1
IIThe Yoga of Sankhya18
IIIThe Yoga of Action45
IVThe Yoga of Wisdom62
VThe Yoga of Renunciation of Action77
VIThe Yoga of Self- Subdual88
VIIThe Yoga of Discriminative Knowledge105
VIIIThe Yoga of the Indestructible Supreme Eternal116
IXThe Yoga of the Kingly Science and the Kingly Secret127
XThe Yoga of Sovereignty139
XIThe Yoga of the Vision on The Universal Form153
XIIThe Yoga of Devotion177
XIIIThe Yoga of the Distinction Between the Field and the Knower of the Field184
XIVThe Yoga of Separation from the three Qualities196
XVThe Yoga of Attaining the Supreme Spirit206
XVIThe Yoga of DivisionBetween the Divine and The Demoniacal215
XVIIThe Yoga of the Threefold Division of Faith224
XVIIIThe Yoga of Liberation by Renunciation235

Sample Pages

















The Bhagavad Gita

Item Code:
NAL787
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2003
Language:
Sanskrit Text with English Translation
Size:
5.0 inch x 3.5 inch
Pages:
282
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 180 gms
Price:
$15.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
The Bhagavad Gita

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 1320 times since 4th Feb, 2016
About the Book

‘The Lord's Song '-is a sacred scripture revered by millions all over the world. It contains priceless teachings which have stood the test of time. This translation by Annie Besant has run into many editions and continues to be a source of inspiration and understanding.

About the Author

Annie Besant(1847-1933) was President of the Theosophical Society from 1907 to 1933. She inspired thousands of men and women all over the world by her great qualities of mind and heart, her selfless service to humanity and her teaching. She was an outstanding orator, a champion of human freedom, an educationist, reformer and author. She also worked unremittingly for the spiritual, cultural and political renaissance of India which she loved as her ‘Spiritual Motherland.'

Preface

Among the priceless teachings that may be found in the great Hindu poem of the Mahabharata, there is none so rare and precious as this, 'The Lord's Song'. Since it fell from the divine lips of Shri Krishna on the field of battle and stilled the surging emotions of his disciple and friend, how many troubled hearts has it quieted and strengthened, how many weary souls has it led to Him! It is meant to lift the aspirant from the lower levels of renunciation, where objects are renounced, to the loftier heights where desires are dead, and where the Yogi dwells in calm and ceaseless contemplation, while his body and mind are actively employed in discharging the duties, that fall to his lot in life.

That the spiritual man need not be a recluse, that union with the divine Life may be achieved and maintained in the midst of worldly affairs, that the obstacles to that union lie not outside us but within us-such is the central lesson of the BHAGAVAD GITA.

It is a scripture of Yoga: now Yoga is literally union, and it means harmony with the divine Law, the becoming one with the divine Life, by the subdual of all outward- going energies. To reach this, balance must be gained, equilibrium, so that the self, joined to the Self, shall not be affected by pleasure or pain, desire or aversion, or any of the 'pairs of opposites' between which untrained selves swing backwards and for- wards. Moderation is therefore the keynote of the GITA, and the harmonizing of all the constituents of man, till they vibrate in perfect attunement with the One, the Supreme Self. This is the aim the disciple is to set before him. He must learn not to be attracted by the attractive, nor repelled by the repellent, but must see both as marifestations of the one Lord, so that they may be lessons for his guidance, not fetters for his bondage. In the midst of turmoil he must rest in the Lord of Peace, discharging every duty to the fullest, not because he seeks the results of his actions, but because it is his duty to perform them. His heart is an altar, love to his Lord the flame burningupon it; all his acts, physical and mental, are sacrifices, offered on the altar; and once offered, he has with them no further concern.

As though to make the lesson more impressive, it was given on a field of battle. Arjuna, the warrior prince, was to vindicate his brother's title, to destroy a usurper who was oppressing the land; it was his. duty as prince, as warrior, to fight for the deliverance of his nation and to restore order and peace. To make the contest more bitter, loved comrades and friends stood on both sides, wringing his heart with personal anguish, and making a conflict of duties as well as physical strife. Could he slay those to whom he owed love and duty, and trample on ties of kindred? To break family ties was a sin; to leave the people in cruel bondage was a sin; where was the right way? Justice must be done, else law would be disregarded; but how slay without sin? The answer is the burden of the book: Have no personal interest in the event; carry out the duty Imposed by the position in life, realize that Ishvara, at once Lord and Law, is the doer, working out the mighty evolution that ends in bliss and peace; be identified with Him by devotion, and then perform duty as duty, fighting without passion or desire, without anger or hatred; thus activity forges no bonds, Yoga is accomplished, and the soul is free.

Such is the obvious teaching of this sacred book. But, as all the acts of an Avatara are symbolical, we may pass from the outer to the inner planes, and see in the fight of Kurukshetra the battlefield of the soul and in the sons of Dhritarashtra, enemies it meets in its progress; Arjuna becomes the type of the struggling soul of the disciple, and Shri Krishna is the Logos of the soul. Thus the teaching of the ancient battlefield gives guidance in all later days, and trains the aspiring soul in treading the steep and thorny path that leads to peace. To all such souls in East and West tome these divine lessons, for the path is one, though it has many names, and all souls seek the same goal, though they may not realize their unity, In order to preserve the precision of the Sanskrit, a few technical terms have been given in the original in footnotes; Manas is the mind, both in the lower mental processes in which it is swayed by the senses, by passions and emotions, and in the higher processes of reasoning; Buddhi is the faculty above the ratiocinating mind, and is the 'Pure Reason, exercising the discriminative faculty of intuition, of spiritual discernment, If these original words are not known to the reader, the BHAGAVAD-GITA loses much of its practical value as a treatise on Yoga, and the would-be learner becomes confused, The epithets applied to Shri Krishna and Arjuna-the variety of which is so characteristic of Sanskrit conversation -are for the most part left untranslated, as being musical they thus add to the literary charm, whereas the genius of English is so different from that of Sanskrit, that the many- footed epithets become sometimes almost grotesque in translation.Nmaes derived from that of an ancestor, as Partha, meaning the son of Pritha, Kaunteya, meaning the son of Kunti, are used in one form or the other, according to the rhythm of the sentence. One other trifling matter, which is yet not trifling if it aids the student: when Atma means the One Self, the SELF of all, it is printed in small capitals; where it means the lower, the personal self, it is printed in ordinary type; this is done because there is sometimes a play on the word, and it is difficult for an untrained reader to follow the meaning without some such assistance. The word Brahman, the ONE, the Supreme, is throughout translated ‘THE ENTERNAL’. The word'Deva', literally 'Shining One', is thus translated throughout. The use of the western word 'God' alike for 'Brahman' and for the 'Devas' is most misleading; the Hindu never uses the one for the other, and never blurs the unity of the Supreme by the multiplicity of ministering Intelligences.

My wish, in adding this translation to those already before the public, was to preserve the spirit of the original, especially in its deeply devotional tone; while at the same time giving an accurate translation , reflecting the strength and the terseness of the Sanskrit. In order that mistakes, due to my imperfect knowledge, might be corrected, the first and second editions of this translation passed through the hands of one or other of the following gentlemen -friends of mine .at Benares-to whom I here tender my grateful acknowledgements: Babus Prarnada Das Mitra, Ganganath Jha, Kali Charan Mitra, and Upendranath Basu. A few of the notes are also due to them. In the third and fourth editions I have also been much helped by Babu Bhagavan Das, to whom I add my cordial thanks.

Contents

Dedicationv
Prefacexi
Discourse
IThe Yoga of Despondency of Arjuna1
IIThe Yoga of Sankhya18
IIIThe Yoga of Action45
IVThe Yoga of Wisdom62
VThe Yoga of Renunciation of Action77
VIThe Yoga of Self- Subdual88
VIIThe Yoga of Discriminative Knowledge105
VIIIThe Yoga of the Indestructible Supreme Eternal116
IXThe Yoga of the Kingly Science and the Kingly Secret127
XThe Yoga of Sovereignty139
XIThe Yoga of the Vision on The Universal Form153
XIIThe Yoga of Devotion177
XIIIThe Yoga of the Distinction Between the Field and the Knower of the Field184
XIVThe Yoga of Separation from the three Qualities196
XVThe Yoga of Attaining the Supreme Spirit206
XVIThe Yoga of DivisionBetween the Divine and The Demoniacal215
XVIIThe Yoga of the Threefold Division of Faith224
XVIIIThe Yoga of Liberation by Renunciation235

Sample Pages

















Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Holy Gita: Ready Reference (Your Doorway to The Bhagavad Gita)
Hardcover (Edition: 2007)
Chinmaya International Foundation
Item Code: NAC897
$32.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Abhinavagupta's Commentary on the Bhagavad Gita: Gitartha Samgraha
Deal 10% Off
Item Code: IDD714
$38.50$34.65
You save: $3.85 (10%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
'Surrender Unto Me
Item Code: IDK185
$37.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Bhagavad-Gita (With the Commentary of Sankaracarya (Shankaracharya)
by Trans By. Swami Gambhirananda
Hardcover (Edition: 2010)
Advaita Ashrama
Item Code: IDE159
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Timeless Leadership: 18 Leadership Sutras From The Bhagavad Gita
by Debashis Chatterjee
Hardcover (Edition: 2013)
Wiley India Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAF131
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Philosophy of The Bhagavad-Gita
Item Code: IDH166
$11.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Bhagavad Gita for Students
by Swami Atmashraddhananda
Paperback (Edition: 2012)
Sri Ramakrishna Math
Item Code: NAE796
$5.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

To my astonishment and joy, your book arrived (quicker than the speed of light) today with no further adoo concerning customs. I am very pleased and grateful.
Christine, the Netherlands
You have excellent books!!
Jorge, USA.
You have a very interesting collection of books. Great job! And the ordering is easy and the books are not expensive. Great!
Ketil, Norway
I just wanted to thank you for being so helpful and wonderful to work with. My artwork arrived exquisitely framed, and I am anxious to get it up on the walls of my house. I am truly grateful to have discovered your website. All of the items I’ve received have been truly lovely.
Katherine, USA
I have received yesterday a parcel with the ordered books. Thanks for the fast delivery through DHL! I will surely order for other books in the future.
Ravindra, the Netherlands
My order has been delivered today. Thanks for your excellent customer services. I really appreciate that. I hope to see you again. Good luck.
Ankush, Australia
I just love shopping with Exotic India.
Delia, USA.
Fantastic products, fantastic service, something for every budget.
LB, United Kingdom
I love this web site and love coming to see what you have online.
Glenn, Australia
Received package today, thank you! Love how everything was packed, I especially enjoyed the fabric covering! Thank you for all you do!
Frances, Austin, Texas
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India