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Buddhist Logic (2 Vols.)
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About the Book:

Western interest in Buddhism has grown enormously in recent years, but because of the scarcity of later Buddhist writings most of the work in the field has dealt with the earlier developments in Buddhism. Also, the available books and articles on Buddhism deal almost exclusively with its religious aspects, and pass over the extensive system of logic that forms an important part of its philosophy as a whole.

This book is coverage of the Mahayana Buddhistic logic of the school of Dignaga (and his follower, expositors, and continuers - especially Dharmakirti). It is in fact the most important work on Buddhist logic ever published. A classic of oriental research, it is founded on a thorough study of original Indian and Tibetan compositions by the great Buddhist logicians. The author was one of the leaders of the St. Petersburg school that did monumental work in the field of Indology during the first quarter of this century.

The first volume is devoted to a history, of Indian logic with Central Asiatic continuations, and then to a detailed expositions of the Dignaga system in terms of theory of knowledge, the sensible world (including causation, sense perception and ultimate reality); the mentally constructed world (judgment, inference, the syllogism, logical fallacies); negation (law of contradiction, universals, dialectic), and the reality of external world. The Second volume is devoted primarily to a translation of Dharmakirti's Nyayabindu, with Dharmottara's commentary. Appendices contain translations from Tibetan logical treatises, Hindu attacks on Buddhist logic, etc.

The author has provided an extremely clear exposition of an important philosophical system that is not well known to the West. The work is all the more, valuable since its is done with an awareness of the history of Western logic and philosophy, well up through Russell and the moderns. Historians of Asian culture, Sanskrit philologists and general philosophers cannot afford to be without it. The general reader with perhaps a basic course in Eastern philosophy will find it highly rewarding.

 

Preface

This work claims the consideration of the historian of the culture of Asia, of the Sanscrit philologist and of the general philosopher.

It is the last of a series of three works destined to elucidate what is perhaps the most powerful movement of ideas in the history of Asia, a movement which, originating in the VI century BC. in the valley of Hindustan, gradually extended its sway over almost the whole of the continent of Asia, as well as over the islands of Japan and of the Indian archipelago. These works are thus concerned about the history of the ruling ideas of Asia, Central and Eastern.'

It also claims the consideration of the Sanscritist, because it is exclusively founded on original works belonging to the sastra class; these are Indian scholarly compositions, written in that specific scien- tific Sanscrit style, where the argument is formulated in a quite spe- cial terminology and put in the form of laconic rules; its explanation and development are contained in numerous commentaries and sub- commentaries. To elucidate this quite definite and very precise termi- nology is the aim of a series of analytical translations collected in the second volume.

In addressing itself to the philosopher this work claims his consi- deration of a system of logic which is not familiar to him. It is a lo- gic, but it is not Aristotelian. It is epistemological, but not Kantian. There is a widely spread prejudice that positive philosophy is to be found only in Europe. It is also a prejudice that Aristotle's treatment of logic was final; that having had in this field no predecessor. he also has had no need of a continuator. This last prejudice seems to be on the wane. There is as yet no agreed opinion on what the future logic will be, but there is a general dissatisfaction with what it at present is. Weare on the eve of a reform. The consideration at this juncture of the independent and altogether different way in which the problems of logic, formal as well as epistemological, have been tackled by Dignaga and .Dhartnakrrti will possibly be found of some importance. The philosopher in thus considering and comparing two different logics will perceive that there are such problems which the human mind naturally encounters on his way as soon as he begins to deal with truth and error. Such are, e. g., the problems of the essence of a judgment, of inference and of syllogism; the problems of the categories a.nd of relations; of the synthetical and analytical judj- ments; of infinity, infinite divisibility, of the antinomies and of the dialectical structure of the understanding. From under the cover of an exotic terminology he will discern features which he is accustomed to see differently treated, differently arranged, assigned different places in the system and put into quite different contexts. The philosopher, if he becomes conversant with the style of Sanscrit compositions, will be tempted not only to interpret Indian ideas in European terms, but also to try the converse operation and to interpret European ideas in Indian terms.

My main object has been to point out these analogies, but not to produce any estimate of the comparative value of both logics. On this f point I would prefer first to hear the opinion of the professional phi- losopher who in this special department of knowledge has infinitely more experience than I may claim to possess. I would be amply satis- fied if I only succeed to arouse his attention and through him to introduce Indian positive philosophers into the community of their European brotherhood.

 

Contents

VOL. ONE

Abbreviations
Preface
Introduction

  1. Buddhist Logic what
  2. The place of Logic in the history of Buddhism
  3. First period of Buddhist philosophy
  4. Second period of Buddhist philosophy
  5. Third period of Buddhist philosophy
  6. The place of Buddhist Logic in the history of Indian philosophy
    1. The Materialists
    2. Jainism
    3. The Sankhya System
    4. The Yoga System
    5. The Vedanta
    6. The Mimamsa
    7. The Nyaya-Vaisesika System
  7. Buddhist Logic before Dignaga
  8. The life of Dignaga
  9. The life of Dharmakirti
  10. The works of Dharmakirti
  11. The order of the chapters in Pramana-vartika
  12. The philological school of commentators
  13. The Cashmere or philosophic school of commentators
  14. The third or religious school of commentators
  15. Post-Buddhist Logic and the struggle between Realism and Nominalism in India
  16. Buddhist Logic in China and Japan
  17. Buddhist Logic in Tibet and Mongolia

 

Part I. - Reality and Knowledge (pramanya-vada)

 

  1. Scope and aim of Buddhist Logic
  2. A source of knowledge what
  3. Cognition and Recognition
  4. The test of truth
  5. Realistic and Buddhistic view of experience
  6. Two realities
  7. The double character of a source of knowledge
  8. The limits of cognition. Dogmatism and Criticism

 

Part II. - The Sensible World

Chapter I. - The theory of Instantaneous Being (ksanika-vada)

  1. The problem stated
  2. Reality in kinetic
  3. Argument from ideality of Time and Space
  4. Duration and extention are not real
  5. Argument from direct perception
  6. Recognition does not prove duration
  7. Argument from an analysis of the notion of existence
  8. Argument from an analysis of the notion of non-existence
  9. Santiraksita's formula
  10. Change and annihilation
  11. Motion is discontinuous
  12. Annihilation certain a priori
  13. Momentariness deduced from the law of Contradiction
  14. Is the point-instant a reality? The Differential Calculus
  15. History of the doctrine of Momentariness
  16. Some European Parallels

Chapter II. - Causation (pratitya-samutpada)

  1. Causation as functional dependence
  2. The formulas of causation
  3. Causation and Reality identical
  4. Two kinds of Causality
  5. Plurality of causes
  6. Infinity of causes
  7. Causality and Free Will
  8. The four meanings of Dependent Origination
  9. Some European Parallels

Chapter III. - Sense-perception (pratyaksam)

  1. The definition of sense-perception
  2. The experiment of Dharmakirti
  3. Perception and illusion
  4. The varieties of intuition
    1. Mental sensation (manasa-praktyaksa)
    2. The intelligible intuition of the Saint (yogi-pratyaksa)
    3. Introduction (svasamvedana)
  5. History of the Indian vies on sense-perception
  6. Some European Parallels

Chapter IV. - Ultimate reality (paramartha-sat)

  1. What is ultimately real
  2. The Particular is the ultimate reality
  3. Reality is unutterable
  4. Reality produces a vivid image
  5. Ultimate Reality is dynamic
  6. The Monad and the Atom
  7. Reality is Affirmation
  8. Objections
  9. The evolution of the views on Reality
  10. Some European Parallels

 

Part III. - The Constructed world

Chapter I. - Judgment

 

  1. Transition from pure sensation to conception
  2. The first steps of the Understanding
  3. A judgment what
  4. Judgment and the synthesis in concepts
  5. Judgment and name giving
  6. Categories
  7. Judgment viewed as analysis
  8. Judgment as objectively valid
  9. History of the theory of judgment
  10. Some European Parallels

Chapter II. - Inference

 

  1. Judgment and Inference
  2. The three terms
  3. The various definitions of inference
  4. Inferring and Inference
  5. How far Inference is true knowledge
  6. The three Aspects of the Reason
  7. Dhamakirti's tract on relations
  8. Two lines of dependence
  9. Analytic and Synthetic judgments
  10. The final table of Categories
  11. Are the items of the table mutually exclusive
  12. Is the Buddhist table of relations exhaustive
  13. Universal and Necessary Judgments
  14. The limits of the use of pure Understanding
  15. Historical sketch of the views of Inference
  16. Some European Parallels

Chapter III. - Syllogism (pararthanumanam).

 

  1. Definition
  2. The members of syllogism
  3. Syllogism and Induction
  4. The figures of Syllogism
  5. The value of Syllogism
  6. Historical sketch of Syllogism viewed as inference for others
  7. European and Buddhist Syllogism
    1. Definition by Aristotle and by the Buddhists
    2. Aristotle's Syllogism from Example
    3. Inference and Induction
    4. the Buddhist syllogism contains two propositions
    5. Contraposition
    6. Figures
    7. The Causal and Hypothetical Syllogism
    8. Summary

Chapter IV. - Logical Fallacies

 

  1. Classification
  2. Fallacy against Reality (asiddha-hetv-abhasa)
  3. Fallacy of a Contrary Reason
  4. fallacy of an Uncertain Reason
  5. The Antinomical Fallacy
  6. Dharmakirti's additions
  7. History
    1. Manuals of Dialecties
    2. The refutative syllogism of the Madhyamikas
    3. The Vaisesika system influenced by the Buddhists
    4. The Nyaya system influenced by Diguaga
  8. European Parallels

 

Part IV. - Negation

Chapter I. - The negative judgment

 

  1. The essence of Negation
  2. Negation is an Inference
  3. The figures of the Negative Syllogism. The figure of Simple Negation
  4. The ten remaining figures
  5. Importance of Negation
  6. Contradiction and Causality only in the Empirical Sphere
  7. Negation of supersensuous objects
  8. Indian developments
  9. European Parallels:
    1. Sigwart's theory
    2. Denied copula and Negative Predicate
    3. Judgment and Re-judgment

Chapter II. - The Law of Contradiction.

 

  1. The origin of Contradiction
  2. Logical Contradiction
  3. Dynamical opposition
  4. Law of Otherness
  5. Different formulations of the Laws of Contradiction and Otherness
  6. Other Indian schools on Contradiction
  7. Some European Parallels
    1. The Law of Excluded Middle
    2. The Law of Double Negation
    3. The Law of Identity
    4. Two European Logics
    5. Heracleitus
    6. Causation and Identity in the fragments of Heracleitus
    7. The Eleatic Law of Contradiction
    8. Plato
    9. Kant and Sigwart
    10. The Aristotelian formula of Contradiction and Dharmakirti's theory of Relations

Chapter III. - Universals

 

  1. The static Universality of Things replaced by similarity of action
  2. History of the problem of Universals
  3. Some European Parallels

Chapter IV. - Dialectic

  1. Dignaga's Theory of Names
  2. Jinendrabuddhi on the Theory of the Negative Meaning of Names
    1. All names are negative
    2. The origin of Universals
    3. Controversy with the Realist
    4. The experience of individuals becomes the agreed experience of the Human Mind
    5. Conclusion
  3. Santiraksita and Kamalasila on the negative meaning of words
  4. Historical sketch of the development of the Buddhist Dialectical Method
  5. European Parallels
      Kant and Hegel
    1. J.S. Mill and A. Bain
    2. Sigwart
    3. Affirmation what
    4. Ulrici and Lotze

 

Part V. - Reality of the External World

 

  1. What is Real
  2. What is External
  3. The three worlds
  4. Critical Realism
  5. Ultimate Monism
  6. Idealism
  7. Dignaga's tract on the Unreality of the External World
  8. Dharmakirti's tract on the Repudiation of Solipsism
  9. History of the problem of the Reality of the External World
  10. Some European Parallels
  11. Indo-European Symposion on the Reality of the External World

Conclusion
Indices
Appendix
Addenda

 

VOL. TWO
Contents

Preface
A Short treatise of Logic (Nyaya-bindu) by Dharmakirti with its commentary (Nyaya-bindu-tika) by Dharmottara translated from the sanscrit text edited in the Bibliotheka Buddhica

 

    1. Perception
    2. Inference
    3. Syllogism

Appendices

 

    1. Vacaspatimisra on the Buddhist Theory of Perception
    2. Vacaspatimisra on the Buddhist Theory of a radical distinction between sensation and conception (pramana-vyavastha versus pramana-samplaya)
    3. The theory of mental sensation (manasa-pratyaksa)
    4. Vasubandhu, Vinitadeva, Vacaspatimisra, Udayana, Dignaga and Jinendrabuddhi on the act and the content of knowledge, on the coordination (sarupya) of percepts with their objects and on our knowledge of the external world
    5. Vacaspatimisra on Buddhist Nominalism (apohavada)
    6. Corrections to the texts of the Nyayabindu, Nyaya-bindu-tika and Nyaya-bindu-tika-Tippani printed in the Bibliotheka Buddhica

Indices

    1. Proper names
    2. Schools
    3. Sanscrit works
    4. Sanscrit words and expressions

 

Sample Pages




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Buddhist Logic (2 Vols.)

Item Code:
IDC857
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
1996
ISBN:
9788120810198
Language:
English
Size:
8.8" X 6.0"
Pages:
1045
Price:
$70.00   Shipping Free - 4 to 6 days
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About the Book:

Western interest in Buddhism has grown enormously in recent years, but because of the scarcity of later Buddhist writings most of the work in the field has dealt with the earlier developments in Buddhism. Also, the available books and articles on Buddhism deal almost exclusively with its religious aspects, and pass over the extensive system of logic that forms an important part of its philosophy as a whole.

This book is coverage of the Mahayana Buddhistic logic of the school of Dignaga (and his follower, expositors, and continuers - especially Dharmakirti). It is in fact the most important work on Buddhist logic ever published. A classic of oriental research, it is founded on a thorough study of original Indian and Tibetan compositions by the great Buddhist logicians. The author was one of the leaders of the St. Petersburg school that did monumental work in the field of Indology during the first quarter of this century.

The first volume is devoted to a history, of Indian logic with Central Asiatic continuations, and then to a detailed expositions of the Dignaga system in terms of theory of knowledge, the sensible world (including causation, sense perception and ultimate reality); the mentally constructed world (judgment, inference, the syllogism, logical fallacies); negation (law of contradiction, universals, dialectic), and the reality of external world. The Second volume is devoted primarily to a translation of Dharmakirti's Nyayabindu, with Dharmottara's commentary. Appendices contain translations from Tibetan logical treatises, Hindu attacks on Buddhist logic, etc.

The author has provided an extremely clear exposition of an important philosophical system that is not well known to the West. The work is all the more, valuable since its is done with an awareness of the history of Western logic and philosophy, well up through Russell and the moderns. Historians of Asian culture, Sanskrit philologists and general philosophers cannot afford to be without it. The general reader with perhaps a basic course in Eastern philosophy will find it highly rewarding.

 

Preface

This work claims the consideration of the historian of the culture of Asia, of the Sanscrit philologist and of the general philosopher.

It is the last of a series of three works destined to elucidate what is perhaps the most powerful movement of ideas in the history of Asia, a movement which, originating in the VI century BC. in the valley of Hindustan, gradually extended its sway over almost the whole of the continent of Asia, as well as over the islands of Japan and of the Indian archipelago. These works are thus concerned about the history of the ruling ideas of Asia, Central and Eastern.'

It also claims the consideration of the Sanscritist, because it is exclusively founded on original works belonging to the sastra class; these are Indian scholarly compositions, written in that specific scien- tific Sanscrit style, where the argument is formulated in a quite spe- cial terminology and put in the form of laconic rules; its explanation and development are contained in numerous commentaries and sub- commentaries. To elucidate this quite definite and very precise termi- nology is the aim of a series of analytical translations collected in the second volume.

In addressing itself to the philosopher this work claims his consi- deration of a system of logic which is not familiar to him. It is a lo- gic, but it is not Aristotelian. It is epistemological, but not Kantian. There is a widely spread prejudice that positive philosophy is to be found only in Europe. It is also a prejudice that Aristotle's treatment of logic was final; that having had in this field no predecessor. he also has had no need of a continuator. This last prejudice seems to be on the wane. There is as yet no agreed opinion on what the future logic will be, but there is a general dissatisfaction with what it at present is. Weare on the eve of a reform. The consideration at this juncture of the independent and altogether different way in which the problems of logic, formal as well as epistemological, have been tackled by Dignaga and .Dhartnakrrti will possibly be found of some importance. The philosopher in thus considering and comparing two different logics will perceive that there are such problems which the human mind naturally encounters on his way as soon as he begins to deal with truth and error. Such are, e. g., the problems of the essence of a judgment, of inference and of syllogism; the problems of the categories a.nd of relations; of the synthetical and analytical judj- ments; of infinity, infinite divisibility, of the antinomies and of the dialectical structure of the understanding. From under the cover of an exotic terminology he will discern features which he is accustomed to see differently treated, differently arranged, assigned different places in the system and put into quite different contexts. The philosopher, if he becomes conversant with the style of Sanscrit compositions, will be tempted not only to interpret Indian ideas in European terms, but also to try the converse operation and to interpret European ideas in Indian terms.

My main object has been to point out these analogies, but not to produce any estimate of the comparative value of both logics. On this f point I would prefer first to hear the opinion of the professional phi- losopher who in this special department of knowledge has infinitely more experience than I may claim to possess. I would be amply satis- fied if I only succeed to arouse his attention and through him to introduce Indian positive philosophers into the community of their European brotherhood.

 

Contents

VOL. ONE

Abbreviations
Preface
Introduction

  1. Buddhist Logic what
  2. The place of Logic in the history of Buddhism
  3. First period of Buddhist philosophy
  4. Second period of Buddhist philosophy
  5. Third period of Buddhist philosophy
  6. The place of Buddhist Logic in the history of Indian philosophy
    1. The Materialists
    2. Jainism
    3. The Sankhya System
    4. The Yoga System
    5. The Vedanta
    6. The Mimamsa
    7. The Nyaya-Vaisesika System
  7. Buddhist Logic before Dignaga
  8. The life of Dignaga
  9. The life of Dharmakirti
  10. The works of Dharmakirti
  11. The order of the chapters in Pramana-vartika
  12. The philological school of commentators
  13. The Cashmere or philosophic school of commentators
  14. The third or religious school of commentators
  15. Post-Buddhist Logic and the struggle between Realism and Nominalism in India
  16. Buddhist Logic in China and Japan
  17. Buddhist Logic in Tibet and Mongolia

 

Part I. - Reality and Knowledge (pramanya-vada)

 

  1. Scope and aim of Buddhist Logic
  2. A source of knowledge what
  3. Cognition and Recognition
  4. The test of truth
  5. Realistic and Buddhistic view of experience
  6. Two realities
  7. The double character of a source of knowledge
  8. The limits of cognition. Dogmatism and Criticism

 

Part II. - The Sensible World

Chapter I. - The theory of Instantaneous Being (ksanika-vada)

  1. The problem stated
  2. Reality in kinetic
  3. Argument from ideality of Time and Space
  4. Duration and extention are not real
  5. Argument from direct perception
  6. Recognition does not prove duration
  7. Argument from an analysis of the notion of existence
  8. Argument from an analysis of the notion of non-existence
  9. Santiraksita's formula
  10. Change and annihilation
  11. Motion is discontinuous
  12. Annihilation certain a priori
  13. Momentariness deduced from the law of Contradiction
  14. Is the point-instant a reality? The Differential Calculus
  15. History of the doctrine of Momentariness
  16. Some European Parallels

Chapter II. - Causation (pratitya-samutpada)

  1. Causation as functional dependence
  2. The formulas of causation
  3. Causation and Reality identical
  4. Two kinds of Causality
  5. Plurality of causes
  6. Infinity of causes
  7. Causality and Free Will
  8. The four meanings of Dependent Origination
  9. Some European Parallels

Chapter III. - Sense-perception (pratyaksam)

  1. The definition of sense-perception
  2. The experiment of Dharmakirti
  3. Perception and illusion
  4. The varieties of intuition
    1. Mental sensation (manasa-praktyaksa)
    2. The intelligible intuition of the Saint (yogi-pratyaksa)
    3. Introduction (svasamvedana)
  5. History of the Indian vies on sense-perception
  6. Some European Parallels

Chapter IV. - Ultimate reality (paramartha-sat)

  1. What is ultimately real
  2. The Particular is the ultimate reality
  3. Reality is unutterable
  4. Reality produces a vivid image
  5. Ultimate Reality is dynamic
  6. The Monad and the Atom
  7. Reality is Affirmation
  8. Objections
  9. The evolution of the views on Reality
  10. Some European Parallels

 

Part III. - The Constructed world

Chapter I. - Judgment

 

  1. Transition from pure sensation to conception
  2. The first steps of the Understanding
  3. A judgment what
  4. Judgment and the synthesis in concepts
  5. Judgment and name giving
  6. Categories
  7. Judgment viewed as analysis
  8. Judgment as objectively valid
  9. History of the theory of judgment
  10. Some European Parallels

Chapter II. - Inference

 

  1. Judgment and Inference
  2. The three terms
  3. The various definitions of inference
  4. Inferring and Inference
  5. How far Inference is true knowledge
  6. The three Aspects of the Reason
  7. Dhamakirti's tract on relations
  8. Two lines of dependence
  9. Analytic and Synthetic judgments
  10. The final table of Categories
  11. Are the items of the table mutually exclusive
  12. Is the Buddhist table of relations exhaustive
  13. Universal and Necessary Judgments
  14. The limits of the use of pure Understanding
  15. Historical sketch of the views of Inference
  16. Some European Parallels

Chapter III. - Syllogism (pararthanumanam).

 

  1. Definition
  2. The members of syllogism
  3. Syllogism and Induction
  4. The figures of Syllogism
  5. The value of Syllogism
  6. Historical sketch of Syllogism viewed as inference for others
  7. European and Buddhist Syllogism
    1. Definition by Aristotle and by the Buddhists
    2. Aristotle's Syllogism from Example
    3. Inference and Induction
    4. the Buddhist syllogism contains two propositions
    5. Contraposition
    6. Figures
    7. The Causal and Hypothetical Syllogism
    8. Summary

Chapter IV. - Logical Fallacies

 

  1. Classification
  2. Fallacy against Reality (asiddha-hetv-abhasa)
  3. Fallacy of a Contrary Reason
  4. fallacy of an Uncertain Reason
  5. The Antinomical Fallacy
  6. Dharmakirti's additions
  7. History
    1. Manuals of Dialecties
    2. The refutative syllogism of the Madhyamikas
    3. The Vaisesika system influenced by the Buddhists
    4. The Nyaya system influenced by Diguaga
  8. European Parallels

 

Part IV. - Negation

Chapter I. - The negative judgment

 

  1. The essence of Negation
  2. Negation is an Inference
  3. The figures of the Negative Syllogism. The figure of Simple Negation
  4. The ten remaining figures
  5. Importance of Negation
  6. Contradiction and Causality only in the Empirical Sphere
  7. Negation of supersensuous objects
  8. Indian developments
  9. European Parallels:
    1. Sigwart's theory
    2. Denied copula and Negative Predicate
    3. Judgment and Re-judgment

Chapter II. - The Law of Contradiction.

 

  1. The origin of Contradiction
  2. Logical Contradiction
  3. Dynamical opposition
  4. Law of Otherness
  5. Different formulations of the Laws of Contradiction and Otherness
  6. Other Indian schools on Contradiction
  7. Some European Parallels
    1. The Law of Excluded Middle
    2. The Law of Double Negation
    3. The Law of Identity
    4. Two European Logics
    5. Heracleitus
    6. Causation and Identity in the fragments of Heracleitus
    7. The Eleatic Law of Contradiction
    8. Plato
    9. Kant and Sigwart
    10. The Aristotelian formula of Contradiction and Dharmakirti's theory of Relations

Chapter III. - Universals

 

  1. The static Universality of Things replaced by similarity of action
  2. History of the problem of Universals
  3. Some European Parallels

Chapter IV. - Dialectic

  1. Dignaga's Theory of Names
  2. Jinendrabuddhi on the Theory of the Negative Meaning of Names
    1. All names are negative
    2. The origin of Universals
    3. Controversy with the Realist
    4. The experience of individuals becomes the agreed experience of the Human Mind
    5. Conclusion
  3. Santiraksita and Kamalasila on the negative meaning of words
  4. Historical sketch of the development of the Buddhist Dialectical Method
  5. European Parallels
      Kant and Hegel
    1. J.S. Mill and A. Bain
    2. Sigwart
    3. Affirmation what
    4. Ulrici and Lotze

 

Part V. - Reality of the External World

 

  1. What is Real
  2. What is External
  3. The three worlds
  4. Critical Realism
  5. Ultimate Monism
  6. Idealism
  7. Dignaga's tract on the Unreality of the External World
  8. Dharmakirti's tract on the Repudiation of Solipsism
  9. History of the problem of the Reality of the External World
  10. Some European Parallels
  11. Indo-European Symposion on the Reality of the External World

Conclusion
Indices
Appendix
Addenda

 

VOL. TWO
Contents

Preface
A Short treatise of Logic (Nyaya-bindu) by Dharmakirti with its commentary (Nyaya-bindu-tika) by Dharmottara translated from the sanscrit text edited in the Bibliotheka Buddhica

 

    1. Perception
    2. Inference
    3. Syllogism

Appendices

 

    1. Vacaspatimisra on the Buddhist Theory of Perception
    2. Vacaspatimisra on the Buddhist Theory of a radical distinction between sensation and conception (pramana-vyavastha versus pramana-samplaya)
    3. The theory of mental sensation (manasa-pratyaksa)
    4. Vasubandhu, Vinitadeva, Vacaspatimisra, Udayana, Dignaga and Jinendrabuddhi on the act and the content of knowledge, on the coordination (sarupya) of percepts with their objects and on our knowledge of the external world
    5. Vacaspatimisra on Buddhist Nominalism (apohavada)
    6. Corrections to the texts of the Nyayabindu, Nyaya-bindu-tika and Nyaya-bindu-tika-Tippani printed in the Bibliotheka Buddhica

Indices

    1. Proper names
    2. Schools
    3. Sanscrit works
    4. Sanscrit words and expressions

 

Sample Pages




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