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The Bustan of Sadi
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Introduction

If among the twenty-two works with which Sadi enriched the literature of his country the Gulistan rank first in popularity, the Bustan (lit. "Garden") may justly claim equal precedence in point of interest and merit.

No comprehensive translation of this important classical work has eitherto been placed before the reading public, but it cannot be doubted that the character of its contents is such as to fully instify the attempt now made to familiarize English readers with the entertaining anecdotes and devotional wisdom which the Sage of Shiraz embodied in his Palace of Wealth. This is the name which he applies to the Bustan in an introductory chapter, and it is one which springs from something more than a poet's fancy, for the ten doors, or chapters, with which the edifice is furnished lead into a garden that is indeed rich in the fruits of knowledge gained by a wide experience of life in many lands, and earnest thought.

The Bustan is written in verse-a fact which adds considerably to the difficulties of translation, since the invariable rule of Sadi, like that of every other Persian poet we have read, is to sacrifice sense to the exigencies of rhyme and metre. In not a few cases the meaning is so confused on this account that even the native commentators, who possess a fund of ingenuity in explaining what they do not properly understand, have been compelled to pass over numerous couplets through 12 The Bustan of Sadi sheer inability to unravel their intricacies and the abstruse ideas of the poet.

Probably in no other language in the world is poetic licence so freely permitted and indulged in as in Persian. The construction of sentences follows no rule; the order of words is just that which the individual poet chooses to adopt, and the idea of time-past, present, and future-is ignored in the use of tenses, that part of a verb being alone employed which rhymes the best.

Notwithstanding idiosyncrasies of this kind, the Bustan is written in a style that is delightfully pure and admirably adapted to the subject. The devout spirit by which Sadi was characterized throughout his chequered life is revealed in every page of the book. In the Gulistan he gave free rein to the quaint humour which for many centuries has been the delight of the Eastern peoples, and which an ever-increasing body of English readers is learning to appreciate and admire. In the Bustan the humour is more restrained; its place is taken by a more sober reasoning of the duties of mankind towards the Deity and towards their fellow-men. Devotion to God and the inflexibility of Fate are the underlying texts of every poem, and the ideality of the one and the stem reality of the other are portrayed in language the beauty of which, it is to be feared, the English rendering does not always adequately convey.

The poems abound in metaphor, a figure of style which Eastern writers employ to a degree that is always exaggerated, and sometimes tedious; but for the purpose of this translation, which aims at a happy medium between literal accuracy and the freed requisite in order to render Oriental Phraseology into polite English, numerous of the more far-fetched allusions have been discarded, to the benefit of the text.

Although a memoir of Sadi’s life include in another volume of this series, it may not be out of place to give here a brief outline of the poet’s career, especially as the Bustan contains several references of his childhood and travels.

Sheikh Muslih-ud-din Sadi was born in Shiraz, in Persia, A.D. 1175; that it is to say, 571 years after the flight of Muhammad from Makkah to Madinah. He was the son of one Abdu’llah (servant of God), who held a Government office under the Diwan of that time. Sadi was a child when his father died, as is made clear from the pathetic poem in the second chapter, ending, with these words:

between literal accuracy and the freed requisite in order to render Oriental phraseology into polite English, numerous of the more far-fetched allusions have been discarded, to the benefit of the text.

Although a memoir of Sadi's life is included in another volume of this series, it may not be out of place to give here a brief outline of the poet's career, especially as the Bustan contains several references to his childhood and travels.

Sheikh Muslih-ud-din Sadi was born in Shiraz, in Persia, A.D. 1175; that it is to say, 571 years after the flight of Muhammad from Makkah to Madinah. He was the son of one Abdu'llah (servant of God), who held a Government office under the Diwan ofthat time. Sadi was a child when his father died, as is made clear from the pathetic poem in the second chapter, ending with these words:

But poorly endowed with earthly riches, Sadi endured many hardships in consequence of this bereavement, and was eventually obliged to live, together with his mother, under the protection of a Saracen chief. How long he remained there it is impossible to say, for the reason that his biographers are the reverse of informing. This much is, however, known, that being imbued from early childhood with an insatiable thirst for knowledge, he eventually journeyed to Baghdad, then at the zenith of its intellectual fame, and was enabled to enter a private school there through the generosity of a wealthy native gentleman. Making full use of the opportunity so favourably presented, the young aspirant progressed rapidly along the path of learning, and at the age of twenty-one made his first essays in authorship. Some fragmentary poems which he submitted with a long dedication to Shams-ud-din, the Professor a Literature at the Nizamiah College of Baghdad, so pleased that able and discerning man that he at once fixed upon Sadi a liberal allowance from his own private purse, with the promise of every further assistance in his power. Soon after this, Said was admitted into the college, and ultimately gained an Idrar, or fellowship. In the seventh chapter of the Bustan he narrates an instructive story reminiscent of his studies at Nizamiah, and, prone to conceit though he often is, he tells the story against himself.

His scholastic life did not terminate until he had reached the age of thirty. Of the value of this prolonged period of study he himself was fully cognisant. "Dost thou not know," he asks in the seventh chapter, "how Sadi attained to rank? Neither did he traverse the plains nor journey across the seas. In his youth he lived under the yoke of the wise: God granted him distinction in after- life. And it is not long before he who is submissive in obedience exercises command." No better example of the truth of this passage could be cited than that afforded by his own case.

On leaving Baghdad, he went in company with his tutor, Abdul Qadir Gilani, on a pilgrimage to Makkah. This was the first of many travels extending over a period of thirty years, in the course of which he visited Europe, India, and practically every part of what are known as the Near and Middle East. A trip through Syria and Turkey is specifically mentioned in this book as inspiring the composition of the Bustan. Not wishing, as he tells us, to return empty-handed to his friends at Shiraz, he built the Palace of Wealth, and offered it to them as a gift. He does not conceal the high opinion which he himself placed upon this product of his gifted pen. The gracefully worded phrases with which he predicted the undying popularity of the Gulistan finds a parallel in the dedication of the Bustan to Atabak Abu Bakr-bin-Sad, the illustrious monarch of Persia beneath whose protection Sadi spent the latter half of his life.

"Although not wishing to sing the praises of kings," he writes, "I have dedicated this book to one so that perhaps the pious will say that Sadi, who surpassed all in eloquence, lived in the time of Abu Bakr Sad." Then, addressing the king, he adds: "Happy is thy fortune that Said's date coincides with thine, for as long as the moon and sun are in the skies thy memory will remain eternal in this book." This conceit is pardonable, since it has been amply justified by time.

After the thirty years of travel, Sadi, becoming elderly, settled down in Persia, where, as has been said, he gained the favour of the rulling prince, from whom he derived not only the dignity and the more tangible advantages of the post of Poet-Laureate, but his takhallus, or titular name, of Sadi. He died at the ripe age of 116, and was buried in his native city.

If the Bustan were the only monument that remained of his genius, his name would assuredly still be inscribed in the roll of the Immortals. One feature of his great intellectual faculties needs to be emphasized, and all the more so because it is apt to be overlooked. That is the increasing power which they assumed as he advanced in years, the truth of which can be understood when it is stated that he composed the Bustan at the age of 82, the Bulistan appearing twelve months later. Few, if any, instances of such sustained mental activity are to be found elsewhere in the entire world's history of letters.

Under the several headings of the various chapters a wide range of ethical subjects is discussed, the whole forming a compendium of moral philosophy the broad principles of which must remain for all time as irrefutable as the precepts of Scriptual teaching.

Sadi's spiritual message is not that of a visionary. His religion was an eminently practical one-he had no sympathies with the recluse and the ascetic. To fulfil one's duties towards one's fellow-men is to fulfil one's duty towards the Deity. That is the root-idea of his teachings. "Religion," he observes, "consists only in the service of the people: it does not lie in the rosary, or prayer-rug, or mendicant's habit."

 

Contents

 

  Introduction  
  In the Name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful 20
  On the Reason for the Writing of the Book 21
  Concerning Atabak Abu Bakr, Son of Sad 22
I. Concerning Justice, Councel, and The Administration of Government  
  Nushiravan's Counsel to his Son 24
  Discourse Concerning Travellers 25
  Story Illustrating the Need for Deliberation 26
  Story of the King whose Coat was Coarse 29
  Story of Darius and the Herdsman 29
  Story of Abdul Aziz and the Pearl 30
  Story of How Tukla was Rebuked by a Devotee 31
  Discourse Concerning Riches and Poverty 31
  Story ofQazal Arsalan and the Fort 32
  A Story of Damascus 33
  Story of a Bully 34
II. Concerning Benevolence  
  Story Illustrative of doing good to the Evil 35
  Story Concerning Fasting 36
  Story Illustrative of Practical Charity 36
  Story of a Man and a Thirsty Dog 37
  Story Apropos of Nemesis 39
  Story of a Fool and a Fox 40
  Story of a Devout Miser 41
  Story of Hatim Tai 42
  Story of Hatim and the Messenger sent to kill him 43
  Story Illustrative of Misdirected Kindness 45
  Discourse Concerning Kindness to Orphans 46
III. Concrning Love  
  Discourse Concerning Constancy 47
  Story of a Danger 49
  Story Illustrating the Reality of Love 49
  Story Illustrative of Patience 49
  Story of One who was Assiduous in Prayer 50
  Story of Sultan Mahmud and his Love for Ayaz 51
  Story of a Village Chief 52
  Story of a Fire-fly 52
  Story of a Moth and a Candle 53
  Another Story on the same Subject 53
IV. Concerning Humility  
  Story of a Raindrop 55
  Story Illustrative of Pious Men regarding themselves with Contempt 55
  Story of Sultan Bayazid Bustami 56
  Discourse on Conceit 57
  Story of the Darwesh and the Proud Cadi 58
  Story of the Honey-seller 60
  Story Illustrating the Forbearance of Good Men 61
  Story Illustrating the Noble-mindedness of Men 62
  Story of a Kind Master and his Disobedient Slave 62
  Story of Maruf Karkhi and the Sick Traveller 63
  Story Illustrating the Folly of the Ignoble 65
  Story of One who had a Little Knowledge 66
  Story Illustrating the Humility of the Pious 66
  Story Illustrating the Value of Soft Words 67
  Story Illustrating the Wisdom of Feigning Deafness 67
  Story Illustrating Forbearance for the Sake of Friends 68
  Story of Luqman, the Sage 69
V. Concerning Resignation  
  Story of a Soldier of Isfahan 70
  Story of the Doctor and the Villager 72
  Story of the Villager and his Ass 72
  Story Illustrating Luck 73
  Story of One who blamed his Destiny 73
  Story of a Darwesh and his Wife 74
  Story of a Vulture and a Kite 74
  Story of a Camel 75
  Discourse Concerning Hypocrisy 76
VI. Concerning Contentment:  
  Story of the King of Khwarazm 78
  Concerning the Evil of Over-eating 78
  Story of a Glutton 79
  Story of a Recluse 79
  Story Illustration the Evils of Avarice 80
  Story of an Ambitious Cat 80
  Story of a Short-sighted Man and his High Minded Wife 81
  Story of a Holy Man who built a House 82
  Story of a Sheikh who became King 82
  Discourse Concerning Riches 83
VII. Concerning Education  
  Discourse Concerning the Excellence of Taciturnity 85
  Story Concerning the keeping of Secrets 86
  Story Illustrating the Fact that Silence is Best for Fools 86
  Story Illustrating the Folly of Impertinence 87
  Discourse on Slander 88
  Story Concerning the same Subject 88
  Why Thieving is better than Slandering 88
  Sadi and his Envious Class-friend 88
  Story of Sadi's Childhood 89
  Story of a Suri' s Rebuke 90
  Concerning Absent Friends 90
  Where Slander is Lawful 90
  Table-bearers Worse than Back-Biters 91
  Faridun and his Wise Vazier 91
  Discourse Concerning Wives 92
  Discourse on the Training of Sons 93
  Sadi Rebuked for his Fault-finding 94
VIII. Cencerning Gratitude  
  A Mother's Warning to her Son 97
  Discourse Concerning the Art of the Most High God 97
  Discourse Concerning the Condition of the Weak 98
  Story ofTughral, King of Shiraz, and the Hindu Watchman 99
  Story of a Thief 100
  Story of One who was not What he Seemed 100
  Story of a Sage Donkey 101
  Story Illustrating the Evils of Pride 101
  Story of Sadi and the Idolaters 102
IX. Concerning Repentance  
  An Old Man's Lament 105
  Advice and Warning 106
  Sadi's Rebuke from a Camel-driver 107
  Story Concerning Sorrow for the Dead 108
  Story of a Pious Man and a Gold Brick 109
  Moral from an Incident in Sadi's Childhood 111
  Story of a Man who Reared a Wolf 111
  Story of a Cheat 112
  A Recollection of Childhood 112
  Story of One who Burned his Harvest 113
  Discourse on Repentance 114
X. Concerning Prayer:  
  A Worshipper's Lament 116
  Story of an Idolater 116

Sample Pages









The Bustan of Sadi

Item Code:
NAJ540
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2006
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ISBN:
8171513468
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English
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Pages:
118
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Introduction

If among the twenty-two works with which Sadi enriched the literature of his country the Gulistan rank first in popularity, the Bustan (lit. "Garden") may justly claim equal precedence in point of interest and merit.

No comprehensive translation of this important classical work has eitherto been placed before the reading public, but it cannot be doubted that the character of its contents is such as to fully instify the attempt now made to familiarize English readers with the entertaining anecdotes and devotional wisdom which the Sage of Shiraz embodied in his Palace of Wealth. This is the name which he applies to the Bustan in an introductory chapter, and it is one which springs from something more than a poet's fancy, for the ten doors, or chapters, with which the edifice is furnished lead into a garden that is indeed rich in the fruits of knowledge gained by a wide experience of life in many lands, and earnest thought.

The Bustan is written in verse-a fact which adds considerably to the difficulties of translation, since the invariable rule of Sadi, like that of every other Persian poet we have read, is to sacrifice sense to the exigencies of rhyme and metre. In not a few cases the meaning is so confused on this account that even the native commentators, who possess a fund of ingenuity in explaining what they do not properly understand, have been compelled to pass over numerous couplets through 12 The Bustan of Sadi sheer inability to unravel their intricacies and the abstruse ideas of the poet.

Probably in no other language in the world is poetic licence so freely permitted and indulged in as in Persian. The construction of sentences follows no rule; the order of words is just that which the individual poet chooses to adopt, and the idea of time-past, present, and future-is ignored in the use of tenses, that part of a verb being alone employed which rhymes the best.

Notwithstanding idiosyncrasies of this kind, the Bustan is written in a style that is delightfully pure and admirably adapted to the subject. The devout spirit by which Sadi was characterized throughout his chequered life is revealed in every page of the book. In the Gulistan he gave free rein to the quaint humour which for many centuries has been the delight of the Eastern peoples, and which an ever-increasing body of English readers is learning to appreciate and admire. In the Bustan the humour is more restrained; its place is taken by a more sober reasoning of the duties of mankind towards the Deity and towards their fellow-men. Devotion to God and the inflexibility of Fate are the underlying texts of every poem, and the ideality of the one and the stem reality of the other are portrayed in language the beauty of which, it is to be feared, the English rendering does not always adequately convey.

The poems abound in metaphor, a figure of style which Eastern writers employ to a degree that is always exaggerated, and sometimes tedious; but for the purpose of this translation, which aims at a happy medium between literal accuracy and the freed requisite in order to render Oriental Phraseology into polite English, numerous of the more far-fetched allusions have been discarded, to the benefit of the text.

Although a memoir of Sadi’s life include in another volume of this series, it may not be out of place to give here a brief outline of the poet’s career, especially as the Bustan contains several references of his childhood and travels.

Sheikh Muslih-ud-din Sadi was born in Shiraz, in Persia, A.D. 1175; that it is to say, 571 years after the flight of Muhammad from Makkah to Madinah. He was the son of one Abdu’llah (servant of God), who held a Government office under the Diwan of that time. Sadi was a child when his father died, as is made clear from the pathetic poem in the second chapter, ending, with these words:

between literal accuracy and the freed requisite in order to render Oriental phraseology into polite English, numerous of the more far-fetched allusions have been discarded, to the benefit of the text.

Although a memoir of Sadi's life is included in another volume of this series, it may not be out of place to give here a brief outline of the poet's career, especially as the Bustan contains several references to his childhood and travels.

Sheikh Muslih-ud-din Sadi was born in Shiraz, in Persia, A.D. 1175; that it is to say, 571 years after the flight of Muhammad from Makkah to Madinah. He was the son of one Abdu'llah (servant of God), who held a Government office under the Diwan ofthat time. Sadi was a child when his father died, as is made clear from the pathetic poem in the second chapter, ending with these words:

But poorly endowed with earthly riches, Sadi endured many hardships in consequence of this bereavement, and was eventually obliged to live, together with his mother, under the protection of a Saracen chief. How long he remained there it is impossible to say, for the reason that his biographers are the reverse of informing. This much is, however, known, that being imbued from early childhood with an insatiable thirst for knowledge, he eventually journeyed to Baghdad, then at the zenith of its intellectual fame, and was enabled to enter a private school there through the generosity of a wealthy native gentleman. Making full use of the opportunity so favourably presented, the young aspirant progressed rapidly along the path of learning, and at the age of twenty-one made his first essays in authorship. Some fragmentary poems which he submitted with a long dedication to Shams-ud-din, the Professor a Literature at the Nizamiah College of Baghdad, so pleased that able and discerning man that he at once fixed upon Sadi a liberal allowance from his own private purse, with the promise of every further assistance in his power. Soon after this, Said was admitted into the college, and ultimately gained an Idrar, or fellowship. In the seventh chapter of the Bustan he narrates an instructive story reminiscent of his studies at Nizamiah, and, prone to conceit though he often is, he tells the story against himself.

His scholastic life did not terminate until he had reached the age of thirty. Of the value of this prolonged period of study he himself was fully cognisant. "Dost thou not know," he asks in the seventh chapter, "how Sadi attained to rank? Neither did he traverse the plains nor journey across the seas. In his youth he lived under the yoke of the wise: God granted him distinction in after- life. And it is not long before he who is submissive in obedience exercises command." No better example of the truth of this passage could be cited than that afforded by his own case.

On leaving Baghdad, he went in company with his tutor, Abdul Qadir Gilani, on a pilgrimage to Makkah. This was the first of many travels extending over a period of thirty years, in the course of which he visited Europe, India, and practically every part of what are known as the Near and Middle East. A trip through Syria and Turkey is specifically mentioned in this book as inspiring the composition of the Bustan. Not wishing, as he tells us, to return empty-handed to his friends at Shiraz, he built the Palace of Wealth, and offered it to them as a gift. He does not conceal the high opinion which he himself placed upon this product of his gifted pen. The gracefully worded phrases with which he predicted the undying popularity of the Gulistan finds a parallel in the dedication of the Bustan to Atabak Abu Bakr-bin-Sad, the illustrious monarch of Persia beneath whose protection Sadi spent the latter half of his life.

"Although not wishing to sing the praises of kings," he writes, "I have dedicated this book to one so that perhaps the pious will say that Sadi, who surpassed all in eloquence, lived in the time of Abu Bakr Sad." Then, addressing the king, he adds: "Happy is thy fortune that Said's date coincides with thine, for as long as the moon and sun are in the skies thy memory will remain eternal in this book." This conceit is pardonable, since it has been amply justified by time.

After the thirty years of travel, Sadi, becoming elderly, settled down in Persia, where, as has been said, he gained the favour of the rulling prince, from whom he derived not only the dignity and the more tangible advantages of the post of Poet-Laureate, but his takhallus, or titular name, of Sadi. He died at the ripe age of 116, and was buried in his native city.

If the Bustan were the only monument that remained of his genius, his name would assuredly still be inscribed in the roll of the Immortals. One feature of his great intellectual faculties needs to be emphasized, and all the more so because it is apt to be overlooked. That is the increasing power which they assumed as he advanced in years, the truth of which can be understood when it is stated that he composed the Bustan at the age of 82, the Bulistan appearing twelve months later. Few, if any, instances of such sustained mental activity are to be found elsewhere in the entire world's history of letters.

Under the several headings of the various chapters a wide range of ethical subjects is discussed, the whole forming a compendium of moral philosophy the broad principles of which must remain for all time as irrefutable as the precepts of Scriptual teaching.

Sadi's spiritual message is not that of a visionary. His religion was an eminently practical one-he had no sympathies with the recluse and the ascetic. To fulfil one's duties towards one's fellow-men is to fulfil one's duty towards the Deity. That is the root-idea of his teachings. "Religion," he observes, "consists only in the service of the people: it does not lie in the rosary, or prayer-rug, or mendicant's habit."

 

Contents

 

  Introduction  
  In the Name of God, the Compassionate, the Merciful 20
  On the Reason for the Writing of the Book 21
  Concerning Atabak Abu Bakr, Son of Sad 22
I. Concerning Justice, Councel, and The Administration of Government  
  Nushiravan's Counsel to his Son 24
  Discourse Concerning Travellers 25
  Story Illustrating the Need for Deliberation 26
  Story of the King whose Coat was Coarse 29
  Story of Darius and the Herdsman 29
  Story of Abdul Aziz and the Pearl 30
  Story of How Tukla was Rebuked by a Devotee 31
  Discourse Concerning Riches and Poverty 31
  Story ofQazal Arsalan and the Fort 32
  A Story of Damascus 33
  Story of a Bully 34
II. Concerning Benevolence  
  Story Illustrative of doing good to the Evil 35
  Story Concerning Fasting 36
  Story Illustrative of Practical Charity 36
  Story of a Man and a Thirsty Dog 37
  Story Apropos of Nemesis 39
  Story of a Fool and a Fox 40
  Story of a Devout Miser 41
  Story of Hatim Tai 42
  Story of Hatim and the Messenger sent to kill him 43
  Story Illustrative of Misdirected Kindness 45
  Discourse Concerning Kindness to Orphans 46
III. Concrning Love  
  Discourse Concerning Constancy 47
  Story of a Danger 49
  Story Illustrating the Reality of Love 49
  Story Illustrative of Patience 49
  Story of One who was Assiduous in Prayer 50
  Story of Sultan Mahmud and his Love for Ayaz 51
  Story of a Village Chief 52
  Story of a Fire-fly 52
  Story of a Moth and a Candle 53
  Another Story on the same Subject 53
IV. Concerning Humility  
  Story of a Raindrop 55
  Story Illustrative of Pious Men regarding themselves with Contempt 55
  Story of Sultan Bayazid Bustami 56
  Discourse on Conceit 57
  Story of the Darwesh and the Proud Cadi 58
  Story of the Honey-seller 60
  Story Illustrating the Forbearance of Good Men 61
  Story Illustrating the Noble-mindedness of Men 62
  Story of a Kind Master and his Disobedient Slave 62
  Story of Maruf Karkhi and the Sick Traveller 63
  Story Illustrating the Folly of the Ignoble 65
  Story of One who had a Little Knowledge 66
  Story Illustrating the Humility of the Pious 66
  Story Illustrating the Value of Soft Words 67
  Story Illustrating the Wisdom of Feigning Deafness 67
  Story Illustrating Forbearance for the Sake of Friends 68
  Story of Luqman, the Sage 69
V. Concerning Resignation  
  Story of a Soldier of Isfahan 70
  Story of the Doctor and the Villager 72
  Story of the Villager and his Ass 72
  Story Illustrating Luck 73
  Story of One who blamed his Destiny 73
  Story of a Darwesh and his Wife 74
  Story of a Vulture and a Kite 74
  Story of a Camel 75
  Discourse Concerning Hypocrisy 76
VI. Concerning Contentment:  
  Story of the King of Khwarazm 78
  Concerning the Evil of Over-eating 78
  Story of a Glutton 79
  Story of a Recluse 79
  Story Illustration the Evils of Avarice 80
  Story of an Ambitious Cat 80
  Story of a Short-sighted Man and his High Minded Wife 81
  Story of a Holy Man who built a House 82
  Story of a Sheikh who became King 82
  Discourse Concerning Riches 83
VII. Concerning Education  
  Discourse Concerning the Excellence of Taciturnity 85
  Story Concerning the keeping of Secrets 86
  Story Illustrating the Fact that Silence is Best for Fools 86
  Story Illustrating the Folly of Impertinence 87
  Discourse on Slander 88
  Story Concerning the same Subject 88
  Why Thieving is better than Slandering 88
  Sadi and his Envious Class-friend 88
  Story of Sadi's Childhood 89
  Story of a Suri' s Rebuke 90
  Concerning Absent Friends 90
  Where Slander is Lawful 90
  Table-bearers Worse than Back-Biters 91
  Faridun and his Wise Vazier 91
  Discourse Concerning Wives 92
  Discourse on the Training of Sons 93
  Sadi Rebuked for his Fault-finding 94
VIII. Cencerning Gratitude  
  A Mother's Warning to her Son 97
  Discourse Concerning the Art of the Most High God 97
  Discourse Concerning the Condition of the Weak 98
  Story ofTughral, King of Shiraz, and the Hindu Watchman 99
  Story of a Thief 100
  Story of One who was not What he Seemed 100
  Story of a Sage Donkey 101
  Story Illustrating the Evils of Pride 101
  Story of Sadi and the Idolaters 102
IX. Concerning Repentance  
  An Old Man's Lament 105
  Advice and Warning 106
  Sadi's Rebuke from a Camel-driver 107
  Story Concerning Sorrow for the Dead 108
  Story of a Pious Man and a Gold Brick 109
  Moral from an Incident in Sadi's Childhood 111
  Story of a Man who Reared a Wolf 111
  Story of a Cheat 112
  A Recollection of Childhood 112
  Story of One who Burned his Harvest 113
  Discourse on Repentance 114
X. Concerning Prayer:  
  A Worshipper's Lament 116
  Story of an Idolater 116

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Jnana Bhaisajya Manjari (A Text on Philosophical Therapeutics)
Item Code: NAN412
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The World of Asian Stories (A Teaching resource)
by Cathy Spagnoli
Paperback (Edition: 2010)
Tulika Publishers
Item Code: NAG786
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Hinduism: The Faith Eternal
by Dr. Satish K. Kapoor
Hardcover (Edition: 2015)
Advaita Ashrama
Item Code: NAL998
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Ethics In Persian Poetry: With Special Reference to Timurid Period
by Ghulam Abbas Dalal
Hardcover (Edition: 1995)
Abhinav Publications
Item Code: IDF769
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Letters From A Sufi Teacher
by Sheikh Sharaf-Ud-Din Yahya Maneri
Paperback (Edition: 2005)
Kitab Bhavan
Item Code: NAH305
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First Day First Show – Writings from the Bollywood Trenches
by Anupama Chopra
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Penguin Books
Item Code: NAC149
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Embroidery In Asia - Sui Dhaga- Crossing Boundaries Through Needle and Thread
by Kapila Vatsyayan
Hardcover (Edition: 2010)
Wisdom Tree
Item Code: IHL691
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Indian Classical Dance: The Renaissance and Beyond
by Leela Venkataraman
Hardcover (Edition: 2015)
Niyogi Books
Item Code: NAJ993
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Nets of Awareness Urdu Poetry and Its Critics
by Frances W. Pritchett
Paperback (Edition: 2004)
Katha
Item Code: NAI416
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Gods, Men and Territory (Society and Culture in Kathmandu Valley)
Item Code: NAM962
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Artwork received today. Very pleased both with the product quality and speed of delivery. Many thanks for your help.
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I wanted to let you know how happy we are with our framed pieces of Shree Durga and Shree Kali. Thank you and thank your framers for us. By the way, this month we offered a Puja and Yagna to the Ardhanarishwara murti we purchased from you last November. The Brahmin priest, Shree Vivek Godbol, who was visiting LA preformed the rites. He really loved our murti and thought it very paka. I am so happy to have found your site , it is very paka and trustworthy. Plus such great packing and quick shipping. Thanks for your service Vipin, it is a pleasure.
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