Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Philosophy > Chinese Wisdom For Today (A Classic Manual on The Art of Living)
Displaying 2154 of 2804         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Chinese Wisdom For Today (A Classic Manual on The Art of Living)
Chinese Wisdom For Today (A Classic Manual on The Art of Living)
Description
About The Book

Following the phenomenal success of his own version of the Tao Te Ching, renowned scholar and translator Stephen Mitchell has composed the innovative Chinese Wisdom for Today. Drawn from the work of Lao-tzu’s disciple Chuang-tzu and Confucius’ grandson Tzu-ssu, Chinese Widsom for Today offers readers a path into reality. It provides advice that imparts balance and perspective and teaches us how to work for the good with the effortless skill that comes from being in accord with the Tao-the basic principle of the universe.

Mitchell has selected the freshest, clearest teachings from these two great students of the Tao and adapted them into versions that reveal the poetry, depth, and humor of the original texts with a thrilling new power. Alongside each adaptation, Mitchell includes his own commentary, at once explicating and complementing the text.

Mitchell’s meditations and risky reimagining of the original texts are brilliant and liberating, not least because they keep catching us off guard, opening up the heavens where before we saw a roof. He makes the ancient teachings at once modern relevant, and timeless.

About The Author

Stephen Mitchell was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1943, educated at Amherst the Sorbonne, and Yale, and de-educated through intensive Zen practice. His many books include the bestselling Tao Te Ching , The Gospel According to Jesus, Bbagavad Gita, The Book of job, Meetings with the Archangel and Gilgamesh Mitchell is married to Byron Katie and cowrote two of her bestselling books: Loving what is and A Thousand Names for joy.

Foreword

"Chinese Wisdom for Today? There's no such thing! What did you do-pull it out of your hat?"

Well, yes, if that is defined as the treasury of recorded wisdom that is our common birthright. In that treasury, there is nothing more precious than the wisdom of the ancient Chinese.

The selections in this book have been adapted from two Chinese anthologies that were probably compiled between 300 and 100 BCE: the Chuang-tzu, parts of which were written by the eponymous sage, Master Chuang (c. 369 - c. 286 BCE), and the Chung Yung ("The Central Harmony"), which was ascribed to Confucius' grandson, Tzu-ssu (c. 483 - c. 402 BCE). I have anthologized these anthologies, picking from them the freshest, clearest, most profound passages. Facing each chapter there is a brief commentary, which is meant to clarify the text or to complement it. I have written these in the spirit of Chuang-tzu, for whom nothing, thank goodness, was sacred.

The first book of the Tao (written by the perhaps legendary Lao- tzu) is the Tao Te Ching, that marvel of lucidity and grace, the classic manual on the art of living. What I wanted to create here was a left to its right, a yang to its yin, a companion volume and anti-manual. The Chuang-tzu had the perfect material for that: deep, subtle, with an audacity that can make your hair stand on end. If Lao-tzu is a smile, Chuang-tzu is a belly-laugh. He's the clown of the Absolute, the apotheosis of incredulity, Coyoteamong the bodhisattvas. And the Chung Yung provided a psy- chological and moral acuity of comparable depth.

Readers who are familiar with the Tao Te Ching but don't yet know the Chuang-tzu or the Chung Yung-or who, having dipped into them, were discouraged by their unevenness-are in for a treat. aturally, since all three texts tell of the Tao that can't be told, there are passages in Chinese Wisdom for Today that overlap with the Tao Te Ching. But even these passages may strike you as revelations, as if some explorer had discovered a trove of un- known Lao- tzu scrolls buried in a desert cave. And there is much that will be entirely new: meditations on dreams, death, language, the I and the other, doing and not-doing, the origin of the uni- verse, the absolute relativity of things.

In addition to these descriptions, we meet a cast of vivid characters, most of them humble artisans or servants, who show us what it means to be in harmony with the way things are: the monkey trainer who turns on a dime in his hilarious, compassionate diplomacy; Ting, Prince Wen-hui's cook, whose one-pointedness elevates butchering to the level of the performing arts and be- yond; Pien the wheelwright, willing to risk his life to teach a ferocious nobleman that what is most valuable can't be taught; Ch'ing the woodworker, whose bell stand is so beautiful that people think a god must have made it; and Chi Hsing-tzu, trainer of champion gamecocks and virtuoso of patience. We also meet philosophers and fools: Lieh-tzu, who has an intimate chat with a skull; Hui-tzu, the epitome of logic and propriety, Chuang-tzu's friend and rival, straight man and foil; the ludicrous Marquis of Lu, who shows that the Golden Rule can be mere projected egotism; and Master Yu, who, even when afflicted with a grotesque deformity, never loses his cheerfulness and sense of gratitude. Finally there is Chuang-tzu himself. We meet him in a few delec- table stories and dialogues, as he wakes up (maybe) from the dream of a butterfly, refuses the post of prime minister, celebrates the death of his beloved wife, or discusses the usefulness of the useless and the happiness of fish.

Chuang-tzu has been called a mystical anarchist, and it's true that his words sometimes have a contrarian flavor that seems to put them at odds with Lao-tzu's concern for enlightened govern- ment. Given the least semblance of control, Chuang-tzu offers a whole world of irreverence and subversion. But if you look more closely, you'll see that he is neither a mystic nor an anarchist. He's simply someone who doesn't linger in any mental construct about reality, someone who lives as effortless action and peace of heart, because he has freed himself from his own beliefs. What he subverts is conventional thinking, with its hierarchies of judgment, its jors and against, betters and worses, insides and outsides, and its delusion that life is random unfair and somehow not good enough. Learn how to govern your own mind, Chuang-tzu says, and the universe will govern itself. In this he is in wholehearted agreement with Lao-tzu and with the meticulous Tzu-ssu, for whom attention to the innermost self is the direct path to a just society.

One of the qualities I most treasure in Chuang-tzu is his sense of the spontaneous, the uncapturable. This makes it easy to fol- low in his footsteps. Since there are no footsteps, all you can follow is what he himself followed: the Tao. He had confidence that in being true to his own insight he was being true to his teacher Lao-tzu. There was nothing to say and no way to say it, yet it had to be said. As a Zen poet-descendant of his wrote more than a thousand years later,

The moon floats above the pine trees
As you sit on the veranda in the cool evening air.
Your fingertips move lightly along the flute.
The melody is so lovely that it makes the listeners weep.
But wisdom's flute has no holes
And its ancient clear music is beyond emotion.
Don't even try to play it
Unless you can make the great sound of Lao-tzu.
What could be more useless than a flute with no holes? Yet, if you understand, you put it to your lips and the ancient clear music happens by itself. Had Chuang-tzu believed that there was anything to live up to, he would have been too intimidated even to try. There was nothing to live up to. There was only a passion for the genuine, a fascination with words, and a constant awareness that the ancient Masters are alive and well in the mind that doesn't know a thing.

Contents

ForewordVII
Abou the AdaptationXI
Chinese Wisdom for Today1
Notes130
Notes on the Adaptation180
Bibliography199
Acknowledgments201

Chinese Wisdom For Today (A Classic Manual on The Art of Living)

Item Code:
NAD622
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2011
ISBN:
9788184951035
Size:
8.5 inch x 5.5 inch
Pages:
213
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 252 gms
Price:
$20.00   Shipping Free
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Chinese Wisdom For Today (A Classic Manual on The Art of Living)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 2809 times since 20th Dec, 2012
About The Book

Following the phenomenal success of his own version of the Tao Te Ching, renowned scholar and translator Stephen Mitchell has composed the innovative Chinese Wisdom for Today. Drawn from the work of Lao-tzu’s disciple Chuang-tzu and Confucius’ grandson Tzu-ssu, Chinese Widsom for Today offers readers a path into reality. It provides advice that imparts balance and perspective and teaches us how to work for the good with the effortless skill that comes from being in accord with the Tao-the basic principle of the universe.

Mitchell has selected the freshest, clearest teachings from these two great students of the Tao and adapted them into versions that reveal the poetry, depth, and humor of the original texts with a thrilling new power. Alongside each adaptation, Mitchell includes his own commentary, at once explicating and complementing the text.

Mitchell’s meditations and risky reimagining of the original texts are brilliant and liberating, not least because they keep catching us off guard, opening up the heavens where before we saw a roof. He makes the ancient teachings at once modern relevant, and timeless.

About The Author

Stephen Mitchell was born in Brooklyn, New York, in 1943, educated at Amherst the Sorbonne, and Yale, and de-educated through intensive Zen practice. His many books include the bestselling Tao Te Ching , The Gospel According to Jesus, Bbagavad Gita, The Book of job, Meetings with the Archangel and Gilgamesh Mitchell is married to Byron Katie and cowrote two of her bestselling books: Loving what is and A Thousand Names for joy.

Foreword

"Chinese Wisdom for Today? There's no such thing! What did you do-pull it out of your hat?"

Well, yes, if that is defined as the treasury of recorded wisdom that is our common birthright. In that treasury, there is nothing more precious than the wisdom of the ancient Chinese.

The selections in this book have been adapted from two Chinese anthologies that were probably compiled between 300 and 100 BCE: the Chuang-tzu, parts of which were written by the eponymous sage, Master Chuang (c. 369 - c. 286 BCE), and the Chung Yung ("The Central Harmony"), which was ascribed to Confucius' grandson, Tzu-ssu (c. 483 - c. 402 BCE). I have anthologized these anthologies, picking from them the freshest, clearest, most profound passages. Facing each chapter there is a brief commentary, which is meant to clarify the text or to complement it. I have written these in the spirit of Chuang-tzu, for whom nothing, thank goodness, was sacred.

The first book of the Tao (written by the perhaps legendary Lao- tzu) is the Tao Te Ching, that marvel of lucidity and grace, the classic manual on the art of living. What I wanted to create here was a left to its right, a yang to its yin, a companion volume and anti-manual. The Chuang-tzu had the perfect material for that: deep, subtle, with an audacity that can make your hair stand on end. If Lao-tzu is a smile, Chuang-tzu is a belly-laugh. He's the clown of the Absolute, the apotheosis of incredulity, Coyoteamong the bodhisattvas. And the Chung Yung provided a psy- chological and moral acuity of comparable depth.

Readers who are familiar with the Tao Te Ching but don't yet know the Chuang-tzu or the Chung Yung-or who, having dipped into them, were discouraged by their unevenness-are in for a treat. aturally, since all three texts tell of the Tao that can't be told, there are passages in Chinese Wisdom for Today that overlap with the Tao Te Ching. But even these passages may strike you as revelations, as if some explorer had discovered a trove of un- known Lao- tzu scrolls buried in a desert cave. And there is much that will be entirely new: meditations on dreams, death, language, the I and the other, doing and not-doing, the origin of the uni- verse, the absolute relativity of things.

In addition to these descriptions, we meet a cast of vivid characters, most of them humble artisans or servants, who show us what it means to be in harmony with the way things are: the monkey trainer who turns on a dime in his hilarious, compassionate diplomacy; Ting, Prince Wen-hui's cook, whose one-pointedness elevates butchering to the level of the performing arts and be- yond; Pien the wheelwright, willing to risk his life to teach a ferocious nobleman that what is most valuable can't be taught; Ch'ing the woodworker, whose bell stand is so beautiful that people think a god must have made it; and Chi Hsing-tzu, trainer of champion gamecocks and virtuoso of patience. We also meet philosophers and fools: Lieh-tzu, who has an intimate chat with a skull; Hui-tzu, the epitome of logic and propriety, Chuang-tzu's friend and rival, straight man and foil; the ludicrous Marquis of Lu, who shows that the Golden Rule can be mere projected egotism; and Master Yu, who, even when afflicted with a grotesque deformity, never loses his cheerfulness and sense of gratitude. Finally there is Chuang-tzu himself. We meet him in a few delec- table stories and dialogues, as he wakes up (maybe) from the dream of a butterfly, refuses the post of prime minister, celebrates the death of his beloved wife, or discusses the usefulness of the useless and the happiness of fish.

Chuang-tzu has been called a mystical anarchist, and it's true that his words sometimes have a contrarian flavor that seems to put them at odds with Lao-tzu's concern for enlightened govern- ment. Given the least semblance of control, Chuang-tzu offers a whole world of irreverence and subversion. But if you look more closely, you'll see that he is neither a mystic nor an anarchist. He's simply someone who doesn't linger in any mental construct about reality, someone who lives as effortless action and peace of heart, because he has freed himself from his own beliefs. What he subverts is conventional thinking, with its hierarchies of judgment, its jors and against, betters and worses, insides and outsides, and its delusion that life is random unfair and somehow not good enough. Learn how to govern your own mind, Chuang-tzu says, and the universe will govern itself. In this he is in wholehearted agreement with Lao-tzu and with the meticulous Tzu-ssu, for whom attention to the innermost self is the direct path to a just society.

One of the qualities I most treasure in Chuang-tzu is his sense of the spontaneous, the uncapturable. This makes it easy to fol- low in his footsteps. Since there are no footsteps, all you can follow is what he himself followed: the Tao. He had confidence that in being true to his own insight he was being true to his teacher Lao-tzu. There was nothing to say and no way to say it, yet it had to be said. As a Zen poet-descendant of his wrote more than a thousand years later,

The moon floats above the pine trees
As you sit on the veranda in the cool evening air.
Your fingertips move lightly along the flute.
The melody is so lovely that it makes the listeners weep.
But wisdom's flute has no holes
And its ancient clear music is beyond emotion.
Don't even try to play it
Unless you can make the great sound of Lao-tzu.
What could be more useless than a flute with no holes? Yet, if you understand, you put it to your lips and the ancient clear music happens by itself. Had Chuang-tzu believed that there was anything to live up to, he would have been too intimidated even to try. There was nothing to live up to. There was only a passion for the genuine, a fascination with words, and a constant awareness that the ancient Masters are alive and well in the mind that doesn't know a thing.

Contents

ForewordVII
Abou the AdaptationXI
Chinese Wisdom for Today1
Notes130
Notes on the Adaptation180
Bibliography199
Acknowledgments201
Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Guide to Buddhahood (Being A Standard Manual of Chinese Buddhism)
by Timothy Richard
Hardcover (Edition: 2008)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: NAD705
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Chinese Madhyama Agama and the Pali Majjhima Nikaya
Deal 10% Off
Item Code: IDC159
$35.00$31.50
You save: $3.50 (10%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Chinese Hevajratantram
Item Code: IDG430
$27.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Kumarajiva – The Transcreator of Buddhist Chinese Diction
by Nirmala Sharma
Hardcover (Edition: 2011)
Niyogi Books
Item Code: NAC542
$70.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Perfection of Wisdom in Eight Thousand Lines and Its Verse Summary
by Edward Conze
Hardcover (Edition: 1994)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: NAC483
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
That Thou Art: The Wisdom of the Upanisads
Item Code: NAC635
$15.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Book of Wisdom: The Heart of Tibetan Buddhism
by Osho
Paperback (Edition: 2005)
Osho Media International
Item Code: IDH509
$55.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Timeless Wisdom (Passages for Meditation from the World’s Saints and Sages)
by Eknath Easwaran
Paperback (Edition: 2009)
Jaico Publishing House
Item Code: IHL470
$23.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The British The Bandits and the Bordermen
by P.V. Rajgopal& K.F. Rustamji
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
Wisdom Tree
Item Code: IHL032
$40.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

Very grateful for this service, of making this precious treasure of Haveli Sangeet for ThakurJi so easily in the US. Appreciate the fact that notation is provided.
Leena, USA.
The Bhairava painting I ordered by Sri Kailash Raj is excellent. I have been purchasing from Exotic India for well over a decade and am always beyond delighted with my extraordinary purchases and customer service. Thank you.
Marc, UK
I have been buying from Exotic India for years and am always pleased and excited to receive my packages. Thanks for the quality products.
Delia, USA
As ever, brilliant price and service.
Howard, UK.
The best and fastest service worldwide - I am in Australia and I put in a big order of books (14 items) on a Wednesday; it was sent on Friday and arrived at my doorstep early on Monday morning - amazing! All very securely packed in a very strong cardboard box. I have bought several times from Exotic India and the service is always exceptionally good. THANK YOU and NAMASTE!
Charles (Rudra)
I just wanted to say that this is I think my 3rd (big) order from you, and the last two times I received immaculate service, the books arrived well and it has been a very pleasant experience. Just wanted to say thanks for your efficient service.
Shantala, Belgium
Thank you so much EXOTIC INDIA for the wonderfull packaging!! I received my order today and it was gift wrapped with so much love and taste in a beautiful golden gift wrap and everything was neat and beautifully packed. Also my order came very fast... i am impressed! Besides selling fantastic items, you provide an exceptional customer service and i will surely purchase again from you! I am very glad and happy :) Thank you, Salma
Salma, Canada.
Artwork received today. Very pleased both with the product quality and speed of delivery. Many thanks for your help.
Carl, UK.
I wanted to let you know how happy we are with our framed pieces of Shree Durga and Shree Kali. Thank you and thank your framers for us. By the way, this month we offered a Puja and Yagna to the Ardhanarishwara murti we purchased from you last November. The Brahmin priest, Shree Vivek Godbol, who was visiting LA preformed the rites. He really loved our murti and thought it very paka. I am so happy to have found your site , it is very paka and trustworthy. Plus such great packing and quick shipping. Thanks for your service Vipin, it is a pleasure.
Gina, USA
My marble statue of Durga arrived today in perfect condition, it's such a beautiful statue. Thanks again for giving me a discount on it, I'm always very pleased with the items I order from you. You always have the best quality items.
Charles, Tennessee
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India