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Books > Hindu > The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda (Set of 9 Volumes)
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The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda (Set of 9 Volumes)
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The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda (Set of 9 Volumes)
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Preface to the Nineteenth Edition

The year 2013 marked the 150th anniversary of Swami Vivekananda’s birth. On this occasion we had brought out the “150th Birth Anniversary Edition” of The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda. With the intention to enhance the readability and the overall look of The Complete Works, the typesetting of the “150th Birth Anniversary Edition” was freshly done (digitally), using a new typeface and a bigger type size. This was a new development in the publication of The Complete Works since the year it was first brought out. However, in spite of the best of intentions, the aforesaid edition, unfortunately, turned out to be a defective one for various technical as well as manual reasons. We sincerely regret this mistake and the inconvenience caused to the readers thereby.

The present edition is a corrected version of the “150th Birth Anniversary Edition”. Meticulous care has been taken to see that this edition is free from mistakes to the utmost extent possible. The Index has been revised. As it has always been, we hope the readers would welcome this edition too.

Preface to the Eighteenth Edition

This edition has been completely typeset in computers to keep up with advances in printing technology. We are sure that readers will welcome this development on the occasion of the 150th birth anniversary of Swami Vivekananda.

Preface to the Eleventh Edition

In addition to the five lectures-one on Krishna, three on the Gita, and one on Mohammed-from the Vedanta and the West of Hollywood, reproduced in the last printing, three more lectures - The Soul and God, Breathing, and Practical Religion: Breathing and Meditation-are reprinted in this edition from the same magazine. The copyright is reserved by the Vedanta Society of Southern California. These lectures, originally taken down by Ida Ansell in shorthand, were later on transcribed into longhand. About these the editor of the magazine remarks:

“In the interest of absolute faithfulness, when transcribing them, no alterations were made in the somewhat incomplete notes Ida Ansell was able to take down. Where omissions were left because of some obscurity, these in the printed version have been indicated by three dots. Any matter added for purposes of clarification has been placed in square brackets.”

Bilvamangala, added in the tenth edition, was found in the papers of Miss S. E. Waldo by Swami Raghavananda.

Preface to the Ninth Edition

As it will appear from the preface to the first edition, all the available works, lectures, letters and conversations of the Swami Vivekananda were originally planned to be published in four or five volumes. Subsequently, more materials came to hand, and the number of volumes multiplied, till at present we have no less than eight of them, each of which is self-contained and is equally inspiring.

It has always been our endeavour to keep abreast of time, so far as printing and get-up are concerned. Thus, though the first edition was printed in a better from in Calcutta. Besides, the successive editors have been constantly at work to remove all inaccuracies and to add fresh materials, such as the Sanskrit Yoga aphorisms in the second edition of the first volume. And the present edition of the first volume is enriched by an index which, we hope, will be greatly appreciated. It is our intention to add such indexes at the end of all succeeding volumes.

In this edition, as in the previous ones, the Sanskrit words are put in Roman types and begin with capital letters, diacritical marks being used only when the words occur for the first time in a chapter or lecture.

Introduction
OUR MASTER AND HIS MESSAGE

In the four volumes of the works of the Swami Vivekananda which are to compose the present edition, we have what is not only a gospel to the world at large, but also to its own children, the Charter of the Hindu Faith. What Hinduism needed, amidst the general disintegration of the modern era, was a rock where she could lie at anchor, an authoritative utterance in which she might recognise herself. And this was given to her, in these words and writings of the Swami Vivekananda.

For the first time in history, as has been said elsewhere, Hinduism itself forms here the subject of generalisation of a Hindu mind of the highest order. For ages to come the Hindu man who would verify, the Hindu mother who would teach her children, what was the faith of their ancestors will turn to the pages of these books for assurance and light. Long after the English language has disappeared from India, the gift that has here been made, through that language, to the world, will remain and bear its fruit in the East and West alike. What Hinduism had needed, was the organising and consolidating of its own idea. What the world had needed was a faith that had no fear of truth. Both these are found here. Nor could any greater proof have been given of the eternal vigour of the Sanatana Dharma, of the fact that India is as great in the present as ever in the past, than this rise of the individual who, at the critical moment, gathers up and voices the communal consciousness.

That India should have found her own need satisfied only in carrying to the humanity outside her borders the bread of life is what might have been foreseen. Nor did it happen on this occasion for the first time. It was once before in sending out to the sister lands the message of a nation-making faith that India learnt as a whole to understand the greatness of her own thought-a self- unification that gave birth to modem Hinduism itself. Never may we allow it to be forgotten that on Indian soil first was heard the command from a Teacher to His disciples, “Go ye out into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every creature!” It is the same thought, the same impulse of love, taking to itself a new shape, that is uttered by the lips of the Swami Vivekananda, when to a great gathering in the West he says, “If one religion be true, then all the others also must be true. Thus the Hindu faith is yours as much as mine.” And again, in amplification of the same idea: “We Hindus do not merely tolerate, we unite ourselves with every religion, praying in the mosque of the Mohammedan, worshipping before the fire of the Zoroastrian, and kneeling to the cross of the Christian. We know that all religions alike, from the lowest fetishism to the highest absolutism, are but so many attempts of the human soul to grasp and realise the Infinite. So we gather all these flowers, and, binding them together with the cord of love, make them into a wonderful bouquet of worship.” To the heart of this speaker, none was foreign or alien. For him, there existed only Humanity and Truth.

Of the Swami’s address before the Parliament of Religions, it may be said that when he began to speak it was of “the religious ideas of the Hindus”, but when he ended, Hinduism had been created. The moment was ripe with this potentiality. The vast audience that faced him represented exclusively the occidental mind, but included some development of all that in this was most distinctive. Every nation in Europe has poured in its human contribution upon America, and notably upon Chicago, where the Parliament was held. Much of the best, as well as some of the worst, of modern effort and struggle, is at all times to be met with, within the frontiers of that Western Civic Queen, whose feet are upon the shores of Lake Michigan, as she sits and broods, with the light of the North in her eyes. There is very little in the modern consciousness, very little inherited from the past of Europe that does not hold some outpost in the city of Chicago. And while the teeming life and eager interests of that centre may seem to some of us for the present largely a chaos, yet they are undoubtedly making for the revealing of some noble and slow-wrought ideal of human unity, when the days of their ripening shall be fully accomplished.

Such was the psychological area, such the sea of mind, young, tumultuous, overflowing with its own energy and self-assurance, yet inquisitive and alert withal, which confronted Vivekananda when he rose to speak. Behind him, on the contrary, lay an ocean, calm with long ages of spiritual development. Behind him lay a world that dated itself from the Vedas, and remembered itself in the Upanishads, a world to which Buddhism was almost modern; a world that was filled with religious systems of faiths and creeds; a quiet land, steeped in the sunlight of the tropics, the dust of whose roads had been trodden by the feet of the saints for ages upon ages. Behind him, in short, lay India, with her thousands of years of national development, in which she had sounded many things, proved many things, and realised almost all, save only her own perfect unanimity, from end to end of her great expanse of time and space, as to certain fundamental and essential truths, held by all her people in common.

These, then, were the two mind-floods, two immense rivers of thought, as it were, Eastern and modern, of which the yellow-clad wanderer on the platform of the Parliament of Religions formed for a moment the point of confluence. The formulation of the common bases of Hinduism was the inevitable result of the shock of their contact, in a personality, so impersonal. For it was no experience of his own that rose to the lips of the Swami Vivekananda there. He did not even take advantage of the occasion to tell the story of his Master. Instead of either of these, it was the religious consciousness of India that spoke through him, the message of his whole people, as determined by their whole past. And as he spoke, in the youth and noonday of the West, a nation, sleeping in the shadows of the darkened half of earth, on the far side of the Pacific, waited in spirit for the words that would be borne on the dawn that was travelling towards them, to reveal to them the secret of their own greatness and strength.

Others stood beside the Swami Vivekananda, on the same platform as he, as apostles of particular creeds and churches. But it was his glory that he came to preach a religion to which each of these was, in his own words, “only a travelling, a coming up, of different men, and women, through various conditions and circumstances to the same goal”. He stood there, as he declared, to tell of One who had said of them all, not that one or another was true, in this or that respect, or for this or that reason, but that “All these are threaded upon Me, as pearls upon a string. Wherever thou seest extraordinary holiness and extraordinary power, raising and purifying humanity, know thou that I am there.” To the Hindu, says Vivekananda, “Man is not travelling from error to truth, but climbing up from truth to truth, from truth that is lower to truth that is higher.” This, and the teaching of Mukti- the doctrine that “man is to become divine by realising the divine,” that religion is perfected in us only when it has led us to “Him who is the one life in a universe of death, Him who is the constant basis of an ever-changing world, that One who is the only soul, of which all souls are but delusive manifestations” -may be taken as the two great outstanding truths which, authenticated by the longest and most complex experience in human history, India proclaimed through him to the modem world of the West.

For India herself, the short address forms, as has been said, a brief Charter of Enfranchisement. Hinduism in its wholeness the speaker bases on the Vedas, but he spiritualises our conception of the word, even while he utters it. To him, all that is true is Veda. “By the Vedas,” he says, “no books are meant. They mean the accumulated treasury of spiritual laws discovered by different persons in different times.” Incidentally, he discloses his conception of the Sanatana Dharma. “From the high spiritual flights of the Vedanta philosophy, of which the latest discoveries of science seem like echoes, to the lowest ideas of idolatry with its multifarious mythology, the agnosticism of the Buddhists, and the atheism of the Jains, each and all have a place in the Hindu’s religion.” To his mind, there could be no sect, no school, no sincere religious experience of the Indian people-however like an aberration it might seem- to the individual that might rightly be excluded from the embrace of Hinduism. And of this Indian Mother-Church, according to him, the distinctive doctrine is that of the Ishta Devata, the right of each soul to choose its own path, and to seek God in its own way. No army, then, carries the banner of so wide an Empire as that of Hinduism, thus defined. For as her spiritual goal is the finding of God, even so is her spiritual rule the perfect freedom of every soul to be itself.

 

Part-I

CONTENTS
  INTRODUCTION XI
1 ADDRESSES AT THE WORLD'S PARLIAMENT OF RELIGIONS, CHICAGO, 1893 1
2 KARMA YOGA 27
3 RAJA YOGA 117
4 LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  SOUL, GOD AND RELIGION 307
  THE HINDU RELIGION 319
  WHAT IS RELIGION? 323
  VEDIC RELIGIOUS IDEALS 334
  THE VEDANTA PHILOSOPHY 347
  REASON AND RELIGION 356
  VEDANTA AS A FACTOR IN CIVILISATION 373
  THE SPIRIT AND INFLUENCE OF VEDANTA 377
  STEPS OF HINDU PHILOSOPHIC THOUGHT 383
  STEPS TO REALISATION 395
  VEDANTA AND PRIVILEGE 407
  PRIVILEGE 420
  KRISHNA 427
  THE GITA I 435
  THE GITA II 447
  THE GITA III 454
  MOHAMMED 467
  BILVAMANGALA 471
  THE SOUL AND GOD 474
  BREATHING 487
  PRACTICAL RELIGION: BREATHING AND MEDITATION 497
  INDEX 505
Part-II

Contents

 

  WORK AND ITS SECRET 1
  THE POWERS OF THE MIND 10
  HINTS ON PRACTICAL SPIRITUALITY 24
  BHAKTI OR DEVOTION 38
I JNANA-YOGA  
  1. THE NECESSITY OF RELIGION 57
  2. THE REAL NATURE OF MAN 69
  3. MAYA AND ILLUSION 87
  4. MAYA AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE CONCEPTION OF GOD 104
  5. MAYA AND FREEDOM 117
  6.THE ABSOLUTE AND MANIFESTATION 128
  7. GOD IN EVERYTHING 142
  8. REALISATION 153
  9. UNITY IN DIVERSITY 172
  10. THE FREEDOM OF THE SOUL 185
  11. THE COSMOS: THE MACROCOSM 199
  12. THE COSMOS: THE MICROCOSM 208
  13. IMMORTALITY 222
  14. THE ATMAN 234
  15. THE ATMAN: ITS BONDAGE AND FREEDOM 251
  16. THE REAL AND THE APPARENT MAN 257
II PRACTICAL VEDANTA AND OTHER LECTURES  
  PRACTICAL VEDANTA: PART I 285
  PRACTICAL VEDANTA: PART II 302
  PRACTICAL VEDANTA : PART III 320
  PRACTICAL VEDANTA : PART IV 333
  THE WAY TO THE REALISATION OF A UNIVERSAL RELIGION 351
  THE IDEAL OF A UNIVERSAL RELIGION 367
  THE OPEN SECRET 388
  THE WAY TO BLESSEDNESS 396
  YAJNAVALKYA AND MAITREYI 406
  SOUL, NATURE, AND GOD 413
  COSMOLOGY 422
  A STUDY OF THE SANKHYA PHILOSOPHY 432
  SANKHYA A D VEDANTA 443
  THE GOAL 452
III REPORTS IN AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS  
  DIVINITY OF MAN 465
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA ON INDIA 468
  RELIGIOUS HARMONY 471
  FROM FAR OFF INDIA 474
  AN EVENING WITH OUR HINDU COUSINS 476
  THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF INDIA 479
  THE RELIGIONS OF INDIA 481
  SECTS AND DOCTRINES IN INDIA 483
  LESS DOCTRINE AND MORE BREAD 485
  THE RELIGION OF BUDDHA 487
  ALL RELIGIONS ARE GOOD 491
  THE HINDU VIEW OF LIFE 494
  IDEALS OF WOMANHOOD 499
  TRUE BUDDHISM 503
  INDIA'S GIFT TO THE WORLD 506
  CHILD WIDOWS OF INDIA 510
  SOME CUSTOMS OF THE HINDUS 512
  INDEX 516
Part-III

Contents

 

 
LECTURES AND DISCOURSES
 
  UNITY THE GOAL OF RELIGION 1
  THE FREE SOUL 6
  ONE EXISTENCE APPEARING AS MANY 19
 
BHAKTI-YOGA
 
  DEFINITION OF BHAKTI 31
  THE PHILOSOPHY OF ISHVARA 37
  SPIRITUAL REALISATION, THE AIM OF BHAKTI-YOGA 42
  THE NEED OF GURU 45
  QUALIFICATIONS OF THE ASPIRANT AND THE TEACHER 47
  INCARNATE TEACHERS AND INCARNATION 53
  THE MANTRA: OM: WORD AND WISDOM 56
  WORSHIP OF SUBSTITUTES AND IMAGES 59
  THE CHOSEN IDEAL 62
  THE METHOD AND THE MEANS 64
 
PARA-BHAKTI OR SUPREME DEVOTION
 
  THE PREPARATORY RENUNCIATION 70
  THE BHAKTA'S RENUNCIATION RESULTS FROM LOVE 73
  THE NATURALNESS OF BHAKTI-YOGA AND ITS CENTRAL SECRET 77
  THE FORMS OF LOVE-MANIFESTATION 79
  UNIVERSAL LOVE AND HOW IT LEADS TO SELFSURRENDER 81
  THE HIGHER KNOWLEDGE AND THE HIGHER LOVE ARE ONE TO THE TRUE LOVER 85
  THE TRIANGLE OF LOVE 86
  THE GOD OF LOVE IS HIS OWN PROOF 91
  HUMAN REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DIVINE IDEAL OF LOVE 93
  CONCLUSION 99
 
LECTURES FROM COLOMBO TO ALMORA
 
  FIRST PUBLIC LECTURE IN THE EAST (COLOMBO) 103
  VEDANTISM 116
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT PAMBAN 136
  ADDRESS AT THE RAMESWARAM TEMPLE ON REAL WORSHIP 141
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS. OF WELCOME AT RAMNAD 144
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT PARA MAKUDI 155
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT SHlVAGANGA AND MANAMADURA 163
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT MADURA 169
  THE MISSION OF THE VEDANTA 176
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT MADRAS 200
  MY PLAN OF CAMPAIGN 207
  VEDANTA IN ITS APPLICATION TO INDIAN LIFE 228
  THE SAGES OF INDIA 248
  THE WORK BEFORE US 269
  THE FUTURE OF INDIA 285
  ON CHARITY 305
  ADDRESS OF WELCOME PRESENTED AT CALCUTTA AND REPLY 306
  THE VEDANTA IN ALL ITS PHASES 322
  ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT ALMORA AND REPLY 350
  VEDIC TEACHING IN THEORY AND PRACTICE 355
  BHAKTI 357
  THE COMMON BASES OF HINDUISM 366
  BHAKTI 385
  THE VEDANTA 393
  VEDANTISM 434
  THE INFLUENCE OF INDIAN SPIRITUAL THOUGHT IN ENGLAND 440
  SANNYASA: ITS IDEAL AND PRACTICE 446
  WHAT HAVE I LEARNT? 449
  THE RELIGION WE ARE BORN IN 454
 
REPORTS IN AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS
 
  INDIA: HER RELIGION AND CUSTOMS 465
  HINDUS AT THE FAIR 470
  AT THE PARLIAMENT OF RELIGIONS 473
  PERSONAL TRAITS 476
  REINCARNATION 478
  HINDU CIVILISATION 480
  AN INTERESTING LECTURE 481
  THE HINDOO REUGION 481
  THE HINDOO MONK 484
  PLEA FOR TOLERANCE 486
  MANNERS AND CUSTOMS IN INDIA 488
  HINDOO PHILOSOPHY 492
  MIRACLES 495
  THE DIVINITY OF MAN 496
  THE LOVE OF GOD 503
  THE WOMEN OF INDIA 505
  BUDDHISTIC INDIA 511
  INDEX 539
Part-IV

Contents

 

I ADDRESSES ON BHAKTI-YOGA  
  THE PREPARATION 3
  THE FIRST STEPS 12
  THE TEACHER OF SPIRITUALITY 21
  THE NEED OF SYMBOLS 33
  THE CHIEF SYMBOLS 40
  THE ISHTA 51
II LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  THE RAMAYANA 63
  THE MAHABHARATA 77
  THOUGHTS ON THE GITA 100
  THE STORY OF JADA BHARATA 109
  THE STORY OF PRAHLADA 113
  THE GREAT TEACHERS OF THE WORLD 118
  ON LORD BUDDHA 132
  CHRIST, THE MESSENGER 135
  MY MASTER 150
  INDIAN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 183
  THE BASIS FOR PSYCHIC OR SPIRITUAL RESEARCH 187
  ON ART IN INDIA 191
  IS INDIA A BENIGHTED COUNTRY ? 193
  THE CLAIMS OF RELIGION 198
  CONCENTRATION 212
  MEDITATION 221
  THE PRACTICE OF RELIGION 231
III WRITINGS: PROSE  
  IS THE SOUL IMMORTAL? 245
  REINCARNATION 249
  ON DR. PAUL DEUSSEN 264
  ON PROFESSOR MAX MULLER 270
  SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF PAVHARI BABA 275
  ARYANS AND TAMILIANS 288
  THE SOCIAL CONFERENCE ADDRESS 295
  INDIA'S MESSAGE TO THE WORLD 300
  STRAY REMARKS ON THEOSOPHY 309
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF THE MAHARAJA OF KHETRI 312
  REPLY TO THE MADRAS ADDRESS 323
  A MESSAGE OF SYMPATHY TO A FRIEND 345
  WHAT WE BELIEVE IN 347
  OUR DUTY TO THE MASSES 352
  REPLY TO THE CALCUTTA ADDRESS 356
  TO MY BRAVE BOYS 358
  A PLAN OF WORK FOR INDIA 362
  FUNDAMENTALS OF RELIGION 366
IV WRITINGS: POEMS  
  KALI THE MOTHER 377
  ANGLES UNAWARES 379
  TO THE AWAKENED INDIA 382
  REQUIESCAT IN PACE 384
  HOLD ON YET A WHILE, BRAVE HEART 385
  NIRVANASHATKAM, OR SIX STANZAS ON NIRVANA 387
  THE SONG OF THE SANNYASIN 389
  PEACE 392
V TRANSLATION OF WRITINGS: PROSE  
  THE PROBLEM OF MODERN INDIA AND ITS SOLUTION 397
  RAMAKRISHNA: HIS LIFE AND SAYINGS 407
  THE PARIS CONGRESS OF THE HISTORY OF RELIGIONS 420
  KNOWLEDGE: ITS SOURCE AND ACQUIREMENT 428
  MODERN INDIA 436
  THE EDUCATION THAT INDIA NEEDS 478
  OUR PRESENT SOCIAL PROBLEMS 485
VI TRANSLATION OF WRITINGS: POEMS  
  TO A FRIEND 493
  THE HYMN OF CREATION 497
  THE HYMN OF SAMADHI 499
  A HYMN TO THE DIVINE MOTHER 500
  A HYMN TO SHIVA 503
  A HYMN TO THE DIVINITY OF SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 506
  “AND LET SHYAMA DANCE THERE" 509
  A SONG I SING TO THEE 514
  INDEX 520
Part-V

Contents

 

  EPISTLES-FIRST SERIES 3
 
INTERVIEWS
 
  MIRACLES 183
  AN INDIAN YOGI IN LONDON 185
  INDIA'S MISSION 188
  INDIA AND ENGLAND 194
  INDIAN MISSIONARY'S MISSION TO ENGLAND 201
  WITH THE SWAMI VIVEKANANDA AT MADURA 204
  THE ABROAD AND THE PROBLEMS AT HOME 209
  THE MISSIONARY WORK OF THE FIRST HINDU SANNYASIN TO THE WEST AND HIS PLAN OF REGENERATION OF INDIA 218
  REAWAKENING OF HINDUISM ON A NATIONAL BASIS 225
  ON INDIAN WOMEN-THEIR PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE 228
  ON THE BOUNDS OF HINDUISM 233
 
NOTES FROM LECTURES AND DISCOURSES
 
  ON KARMA-YOGA 239
  ON FANATICISM 242
  WORK IS WORSHIP 245
  WORK WI'IHOUT MOTIVE 246
  SADHANAS OR PREPARATIONS FOR HIGHER LIFE 249
  THE COSMOS AND THE SELF 255
  WHO IS A REAL GURU? 257
  ON ART 258
  ON LANGUAGE 259
  THE SANNYASIN 260
  THE SANNY ASIN AND THE HOUSEHOLDER 260
  THE EVILS OF ADHIKARIVADA 262
  ON BHAKTI-YOGA 265
  ISHVARA AND BRAHMAN 269
  ON JNANA-YOGA 270
  THE CAUSE OF ILLUSION 276
  EVOLUTION 277
  BUDDHISM AND VEDANTA 279
  ON THE VEDANTA PHILOSOPHY 281
  LAW AND FREEDOM 286
  THE GOAL AND METHODS OF REALISAT10N 291
  WORLD-WIDE UNITY 293
  THE AIM OF RAJA-YOGA 293
 
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
 
I DISCUSSION AT THE GRADUATE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY 297
II AT THE TWENTEETH CENTURY CLUB OF BOSTON 310
III AT THE BROOKLYN ETIHCAL SOCIETY, BROOKLYN 312
IV SELECT1ONS FROM MATH DIARY 314
V YOGA, VAlRAGYA, TAPASYA, LOVE 319
VI IN ANSWER TO NIVEDITA 320
VII GURU, AVATARA, YOGA, JAPA, SEVA 322
 
CONVERSATIONS AND DIALOGUES
 
I SHRI SURENDRA NATH DAS GUPTA 329
II-V SHRI SURENDRA NATH SEN 332
VI-X SHRI PRIYA NATH SINHA 349
XI-XV FROM THE DIARY OF A DISCIPLE, SHRI SHARAT CHANDRA CHAKRAVARTY 379
  SAYINGS AND UTTERANCES 409
 
WRITINGS: PROSE AND POEMS-Original and Translated
 
  REASON, FAITH, AND LOVE 425
  SIX SANSKRIT MOTTOES 427
  THE MESSAGE OF DIVINE WISDOM  
  I BONDAGE; II THE LAW; III THE ABSOLUTE AND THE A'ITAINMENT OF FREEDOM 428
  THE BELUR MATH: AN APPEAL 434
  THE ADVAlTA ASHRAMA, HIMALAYAS 435
  THE RAMAKRISHNA HOME OF SERVICE, VARANASI: AN APPEAL 436
  WHO KNOWS HOW MOTHER PLAYS 439
  TO THE FOURTH OF JULY 439
  THE EAST AND THE WEST 441
  INDEX 539
Part-VI

Contents

 

I LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  THE METHODS AND PURPOSE OF RELIGION 3
  THE NATURE OF THE SOUL AND ITS GOAL 18
  THE IMPORTANCE OF PSYCHOLOGY 28
  NATURE AND MAN 33
  CONCENTRATION AND BREATHING 37
  INTRODUCTION TO JNANA-YOGA 41
  THE VEDANTA PHILOSOPHY AND CHRISTIANITY 46
  WORSHIPPER AND WORSHIPPED 49
  FORMAL WORSHIP 58
  DIVINE LOVE 68
II NOTES OF CLASS TALKS AND LECTURES  
  RELIGION AND SCIENCE 79
  RELIGION IS REALISATION 81
  RELIGION IS SELF-ABNEGATION 82
  UNSELFISH WORK IS TRUE RENUNCIATION 83
  FREEDOM OF THE SELF 84
  NOTES ON VEDANTA 85
  HINDU AND GREEK 87
  THOUGHTS ON THE VEDAS AND UPANISHADS 88
  ON RAJA-YOGA 91
  ON BHAKTI-YOGA 93
  ON JNANA-YOGA 95
  THE REALITY AND SHADOW 96
  HOW TO BECOME FREE 97
  SOUL AND GOD 99
  THE GOAL 100
  ON PROOF OF RELIGION 101
  THE DESIGN THEORY 104
  SPIRIT AND NATURE 106
  THE PRACTICE OF RELIGION 109
  FRAGMENTARY NOTES ON THE RAMAYANA 111
  NOTES TAKEN DOWN IN MADRAS, 1892-93 113
  CONCENTRATION 133
  THE POWER OF THE MIND 135
  LESSONS ON RAJA-YOGA 138
  LESSONS ON BHAKTI-YOGA 147
  MOTHER-WORSHIP 156
  NARADA-BHAKTI-SUTRAS 162
III WRITINGS: PROSE AND POEMS  
  HISTORICAL EVOLUTION OF INDIA 169
  THE STORY OF THE BOY GOPALA 180
  MY PLAY IS DONE 187
  THE CUP 190
  A BENEDICTION 191
  THE HYMN OF CREATION 192
  ON THE SEA'S BOSOM 194
  HINDUISM AND SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 195
  THE BENGALI LANGUAGE 201
  MATTER FOR SERIOUS THOUGHT 205
  SHIVA'S DEMON 211
IV EPISTLES  
  SERIAL NOS. 1-168 215
V CONVERSATIONS AND DIALOGUES  
  1-12 (From the Diary of a Disciple) 447
  INDEX 519
Part-VII

Contents

 

I INSPIRED TALKS 1
II CONVERSATIONS AND DIAWGUES  
  1-29 (From the Diary of a Disciple) 103
  30-31 (Shri Priyanath Sinha) 256
  32 (Mrs. Wright) 265
  33 (The Appeal-Avalanche) 269
  34 (The Detroit Free Press) 273
  35 (The Detroit Tribune) 277
III TRANSLATIONS OF WRITINGS  
  MEMOIRS OF EUROPEAN TRAVEL 285
IV NOTES OF CLASS TALKS AND LECTURES  
A NOTES OF CLASS TALKS  
  ON ART 393
  ON MUSIC 393
  ON MANTRA AND MANTRA-CHAITANYA 393
  ON CONCEPTIONS OF GODGHEAD 394
  ON FOOD 395
  ON SANNYAS AND FAMILY LIFE 395
  ON QUESTIONING THE COMPETENCY OF THE GURU 396
  SRI RAMAKRISHNA: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS LIFE AND TEACHINGS 397
  ON SRI RAMAKRISHNA AND HIS VIEWS 398
  SRI RAMAKRISHNA: THE NATION'S IDEAL 400
B NOTES OF LECTURES  
  MERCENARIES IN RELIGION 401
  THE DESTINY OF MAN 404
  REINCARNATION 407
  COMPARATIVE THEOLOGY 410
  BUDDHISM, THE RELIGION OF THE LIGHT OF ASIA 413
  THE SCIENCE OF YOGA 414
V EPISTLES 423
  INDEX 504
Part-VIII

Contents

 

  PREFACES III
I LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  DISCOURSES ON JNANA-YOGA 3
  SIX LESSONS ON RAJA-YOGA 34
  WOMEN OF INDIA 50
  MY LIFE AND MISSION 69
  BUDDHA'S MESSAGE TO THE WORLD 87
  DISCIPLESHIP 101
  IS VEDANTA THE FUTURE RELIGION? 116
II WRITINGS: PROSE AND POEMS  
 
PROSE
 
  STRUGGLE FOR EXPANSION 137
  THE BIRTH OF RELIGION 140
  FOUR PATHS OF YOGA 144
  CYCLIC REST AND CHANGE 148
  A PREFACE TO THE IMITATION OF CHRIST 151
 
POEMS
 
  AN INTERESTING CORRESPONDENCE 154
  THOU BLESSED DREAM 159
  LIGHT 160
  THE LIVING GOD 160
  TO AN EARLY VIOLET 161
  TO MY OWN SOUL 161
  THE DANCE OF SHIVA 162
  SHIVA IN ECSTASY 162
  TO SHRI KRISHNA 163
  A HYMN TO SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 163
  A HYMN TO SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 164
III NO ONE TO BLAME 166
  NOTES OF CLASS TALKS AND LECTURES  
  NOTES OF CLASS TALKS 171
  NOTES OF LECTURES 175
  MAN THE MAKER OF HIS DESTINY 175
  GOD: PERSONAL AND IMPERSONAL 180
  THE DIVINE INCARNATION OR AVATARA 182
  PRANAYAMA 184
  WOMEN OF THE EAST 190
  CONGRESS OF RELIGIOUS UNITY 192
  THE LOVE OF GOD-I 193
  THE LOVE OF GOD-II 195
  INDIA 198
  HINDUS AND CHRISTIANS 203
  CHRISTIANITY IN INDIA 208
  THE RELIGION OF LOVE 214
  JNANA AND KARMA 219
  THE CLAIMS OF VEDANTA ON THE MODERN WORLD 224
  THE LAWS OF LIFE AND DEATH 228
  THE REALITY AND THE SHADOW 230
  WAY TO SALVATION 232
  THE PEOPLE OF INDIA 234
  I AM THAT I AM 237
  UNITY 243
  THE WORSHIP OF THE DIVINE MOTHER 245
  THE ESSENCE OF RELIGION 247
IV SAYINGS AND UTTERANCES 253
V EPISTLES - (Fourth Series) 273
  INDEX 509
Part-IX

Contents

 

  PREFACE III
  ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND ABBREVIATION VI
I EPISTLES  
  SERIAL NOS. 1-238 3
II LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  THE WOMEN OF INDIA 207
  THE FIRST STEP TOWARDS JNANA 227
  BHAKTI-YOGA 244
  THE MUNDAKA UPANISHAD 258
  HISTORY OF THE ARYAN RACE 273
III NOTES OF LECTURE AND CLASSES  
  THE RELIGION OF INDIA 293
  CHRIST'S MESSAGE TO THE WORLD 297
  MOHAMMED'S MESSAGE TO THE WORLD 298
  CLASS LESSON IN MEDITION 300
  THE GITA-I 301
  THE GITA-II 303
  THE GITA-III 305
  GITA CLASS 308
  REMARKS FROM VARIOUS LECTURES 309
IV WRITINGS: PROSE AND POEMS  
  THE ETHER 313
  NOTES 318
  LECTURE NOTES 320
  MACROCOSM AND MICROCOSM 322
  FOOTNOTES TO THE IMITATION OF CHRIST 323
  THE PLAGUE MANIFESTO 330
  ONE CIRCLE MORE 333
  AN UNTITLED POEM ON SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 336
  AN UNFINISHED POEM 337
  BHARTRIHARI'S VERSES ON RENUNCIATION 338
V CONVERSTIONS AND INTERVIEWS  
  FIRST MEETING WITH MADAME EMMA CALVE 351
  FIRST MEETING WITH JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER 352
  A DUSKY PHILOSOPHER FROM INDIA 354
  WE ARE HYPNOTIZED INTO WEAKNESS 358
  MARRIAGE 359
  LINE OF DEMARCATION 359
  GOD IS 360
  RENUNCIATION 360
  SHRI RAMAKRISHNA'S DISCIPLE 360
  THE MASTER'S DIVINE INCARNATION 361
  A PRIVATE ADMISSION 361
  A GREETING 361
  "THIS WORLD IS A CIRCUS RING" 361
  ON KALI 362
  TRAINING UNDER SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 362
VI NOTES OF SOME WANDERINGS WITH THE SWAMI VIVEKANANDA  
  FOREWORD 367
  CHAPTER (i): THE HOUSE ON THE GANGES 370
  CHAPTER (ii): AT NAINITAL AND ALMORA 375
  CHAPTER (iii): MORNING TALKS AT ALMORA 379
  CHAPTER (iv): ON THE WAY TO KATHGODAM 393
  CHAPTER (v): ON THE WAY TO BARAMULLA 396
  CHAPTER (vi): THE VALE OF KASHMIR 402
  CHAPTER (vii): LIFE AT SRINAGAR 405
  CHAPTER (viii): THE TEMPLE OF PANDRENTHAN 412
  CHAPTER (ix): WALKS AND TALKS BESIDE THE JHELUM 420
  CHAPTER (x): THE SHRINE OF AMAENATH 427
  CHAPTER (xi): AT SRINAGAR ON THE RETURN JOURNEY 432
  CHAPTER (xii): THE CAMP UNDER THE CHENNAARS 435
  CONCLUDING WORD OF THE EDITOR 440
VII SAYING AND UTTERANCES  
VIII NEWSPAPER REPORTS  
 
PART A: AMERICAN NEWSPAPER REPORTS
 
  RESPONSE TO WELCOME 471
  PARLOR TALK 473
  RELIGIONS OF INDIA 473
  ALL RELIGONS ARE TRUE 476
  A MESSAGE FROM INDIA 478
  REINCARNATION 479
  AN INTELLENCTUAL FEAST 481
  A PRAYER MEETING 482
  ON AMERICAN WOMAN 483
  ON THE BRAHMO SAMAJ 483
  A WITTY HINDU 484
  THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF INDIA 485
  HINDU PHILOSOPHY 487
  A GOD EVERYDAY 489
  VIVE KANANDA LEAVES 490
  CULTURE AT HOME 490
  KANANDA, THE PAGAN 491
  AS THE WAVE FOLLOWS WAVE 499
  WAYSIDE STORIES 500
  A HINDOO MONK 501
  KANANDA ARRIVES 501
  THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF INDIA 501
  A LECTURE ON "INDIA AND HINDUISM" 504
  AT SMITH COLLEGE, NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 505
  A LECTURE ON INDIA AND REINCARNATION 505
  LECTURE BY HINDOO MONK 506
  THE BRAHMAN MONK 509
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA 512
  NIRVANASHATKAM 513
  THE NONSENSE OF NATIONS 514
  A HIGH PRIST OF INDIA 515
  PRIST SWAMI IN TOWN 516
  A WISE MAN AMONG US 518
  LOVE RELIGION'S ESSENCE 519
  THE HINDOO OPTIMISTIC 523
  VIVEKANANDA'S LECTURE 524
  LET INDIA ALONE 524
  ABOU BEN ADHEM'S IDEAL 525
  THE DOCTRINE OF THE SWAMI 527
  "UNIVERSAL RELIGION" 528
  VIVEKANANDA'S PHILOSOPHYHY 531
  HEARD SWAMI TALK 532
  PHILOSOPHY OF FREEDOM 533
  OUT OF THE EAST 535
  UNIVERSAL RELIGION IS IMPOSSIBLE 537
  FOR UNIVERSAL RELIGION 537
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA 543
  HINDU PHILOSOPHY 546
  CONCEPTION OF THE UNIVERSE 547
  TOLD ABOUT INDIA 549
  THE RELIGION LEGENDS OF INDIA 551
  THE SCIENCE OF YOGA 552
  AT THE LOS ANGELES HOME 552
  HINDOO MONK LECTURES 554
  VEDANTISM, AND WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT IS NOT 554
  TRUE RELIGION 556
 
PART B: EUROPEAN NEWSPAPER REPORTS
 
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA ON LOVE 559
  AN INDIAN ASCETIC 562
  NATIVE INDIAN LECTURER AT PRINCES' HALL 563
  THE CHRISTIAN COMMONWEALTH 564
  AN UNIVERSAL RELIGION 565
  EDUCATION 566
  THE VEDANTA PHILOSOPHY 566
  AN OCTOBER CLASS REVIEW 568
 
PART C: INDIAN NEWSPAPER REPORTS
 
  A BENGALI SADHU 570
  THE PARLIAMENT OF RELIGIONS 574
  PARLIAMENT OF RELGIONS IN CHICAGO 575
  ON CHRISTIAN CONVERSTION 576
  THE CENTRAL IDEA OF THE VEDAS 577
  ON THE SEA-VOYAGE MOVEMENT 577
  "BUDDHISM, THE FULFILMENT OF HINDUISM" 580
  INDIAN PHILOSOPHY AND WESTERN SOCIETY 580
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA IN AMERICA 581
  ON EDUCATION 582
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA IN ENGLAND 583
  ON THE SWISS ALPS 586
  "THE IDEAL OF UNIVERSAL RELIGION" 587
  THE BANQUET FOR RANJIT SINJHI 589
  THE MAJLIS IN CAMBRIDGE 590
  VIVEKANANDA IN THE WEST 591
  BHAKTI 592
  OUR MISSION IN AMERICA 592
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA ON EDUCATION AT BELUR 593
  HINDU WIDOWS 595
  APPENDIX 1: CHRONOLOGICAL INDEC TO LETTERS 597
  APPENDIX 2: ADDRESSEE-WISE INDEX TO LETTERS 622
  APPENDIX 3: ADDRESSEE-WISE NUMBER OF LETTERS 629
  APPENDIX 4: INDEX TO SOURCES OF LETTERS 633
  GLOSSARY 643
  INDEX 649
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Part-IX










The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda (Set of 9 Volumes)

Item Code:
NAK288
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2016
Publisher:
ISBN:
9788175053922
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 Inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
4593
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 6.3 kg
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Preface to the Nineteenth Edition

The year 2013 marked the 150th anniversary of Swami Vivekananda’s birth. On this occasion we had brought out the “150th Birth Anniversary Edition” of The Complete Works of Swami Vivekananda. With the intention to enhance the readability and the overall look of The Complete Works, the typesetting of the “150th Birth Anniversary Edition” was freshly done (digitally), using a new typeface and a bigger type size. This was a new development in the publication of The Complete Works since the year it was first brought out. However, in spite of the best of intentions, the aforesaid edition, unfortunately, turned out to be a defective one for various technical as well as manual reasons. We sincerely regret this mistake and the inconvenience caused to the readers thereby.

The present edition is a corrected version of the “150th Birth Anniversary Edition”. Meticulous care has been taken to see that this edition is free from mistakes to the utmost extent possible. The Index has been revised. As it has always been, we hope the readers would welcome this edition too.

Preface to the Eighteenth Edition

This edition has been completely typeset in computers to keep up with advances in printing technology. We are sure that readers will welcome this development on the occasion of the 150th birth anniversary of Swami Vivekananda.

Preface to the Eleventh Edition

In addition to the five lectures-one on Krishna, three on the Gita, and one on Mohammed-from the Vedanta and the West of Hollywood, reproduced in the last printing, three more lectures - The Soul and God, Breathing, and Practical Religion: Breathing and Meditation-are reprinted in this edition from the same magazine. The copyright is reserved by the Vedanta Society of Southern California. These lectures, originally taken down by Ida Ansell in shorthand, were later on transcribed into longhand. About these the editor of the magazine remarks:

“In the interest of absolute faithfulness, when transcribing them, no alterations were made in the somewhat incomplete notes Ida Ansell was able to take down. Where omissions were left because of some obscurity, these in the printed version have been indicated by three dots. Any matter added for purposes of clarification has been placed in square brackets.”

Bilvamangala, added in the tenth edition, was found in the papers of Miss S. E. Waldo by Swami Raghavananda.

Preface to the Ninth Edition

As it will appear from the preface to the first edition, all the available works, lectures, letters and conversations of the Swami Vivekananda were originally planned to be published in four or five volumes. Subsequently, more materials came to hand, and the number of volumes multiplied, till at present we have no less than eight of them, each of which is self-contained and is equally inspiring.

It has always been our endeavour to keep abreast of time, so far as printing and get-up are concerned. Thus, though the first edition was printed in a better from in Calcutta. Besides, the successive editors have been constantly at work to remove all inaccuracies and to add fresh materials, such as the Sanskrit Yoga aphorisms in the second edition of the first volume. And the present edition of the first volume is enriched by an index which, we hope, will be greatly appreciated. It is our intention to add such indexes at the end of all succeeding volumes.

In this edition, as in the previous ones, the Sanskrit words are put in Roman types and begin with capital letters, diacritical marks being used only when the words occur for the first time in a chapter or lecture.

Introduction
OUR MASTER AND HIS MESSAGE

In the four volumes of the works of the Swami Vivekananda which are to compose the present edition, we have what is not only a gospel to the world at large, but also to its own children, the Charter of the Hindu Faith. What Hinduism needed, amidst the general disintegration of the modern era, was a rock where she could lie at anchor, an authoritative utterance in which she might recognise herself. And this was given to her, in these words and writings of the Swami Vivekananda.

For the first time in history, as has been said elsewhere, Hinduism itself forms here the subject of generalisation of a Hindu mind of the highest order. For ages to come the Hindu man who would verify, the Hindu mother who would teach her children, what was the faith of their ancestors will turn to the pages of these books for assurance and light. Long after the English language has disappeared from India, the gift that has here been made, through that language, to the world, will remain and bear its fruit in the East and West alike. What Hinduism had needed, was the organising and consolidating of its own idea. What the world had needed was a faith that had no fear of truth. Both these are found here. Nor could any greater proof have been given of the eternal vigour of the Sanatana Dharma, of the fact that India is as great in the present as ever in the past, than this rise of the individual who, at the critical moment, gathers up and voices the communal consciousness.

That India should have found her own need satisfied only in carrying to the humanity outside her borders the bread of life is what might have been foreseen. Nor did it happen on this occasion for the first time. It was once before in sending out to the sister lands the message of a nation-making faith that India learnt as a whole to understand the greatness of her own thought-a self- unification that gave birth to modem Hinduism itself. Never may we allow it to be forgotten that on Indian soil first was heard the command from a Teacher to His disciples, “Go ye out into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every creature!” It is the same thought, the same impulse of love, taking to itself a new shape, that is uttered by the lips of the Swami Vivekananda, when to a great gathering in the West he says, “If one religion be true, then all the others also must be true. Thus the Hindu faith is yours as much as mine.” And again, in amplification of the same idea: “We Hindus do not merely tolerate, we unite ourselves with every religion, praying in the mosque of the Mohammedan, worshipping before the fire of the Zoroastrian, and kneeling to the cross of the Christian. We know that all religions alike, from the lowest fetishism to the highest absolutism, are but so many attempts of the human soul to grasp and realise the Infinite. So we gather all these flowers, and, binding them together with the cord of love, make them into a wonderful bouquet of worship.” To the heart of this speaker, none was foreign or alien. For him, there existed only Humanity and Truth.

Of the Swami’s address before the Parliament of Religions, it may be said that when he began to speak it was of “the religious ideas of the Hindus”, but when he ended, Hinduism had been created. The moment was ripe with this potentiality. The vast audience that faced him represented exclusively the occidental mind, but included some development of all that in this was most distinctive. Every nation in Europe has poured in its human contribution upon America, and notably upon Chicago, where the Parliament was held. Much of the best, as well as some of the worst, of modern effort and struggle, is at all times to be met with, within the frontiers of that Western Civic Queen, whose feet are upon the shores of Lake Michigan, as she sits and broods, with the light of the North in her eyes. There is very little in the modern consciousness, very little inherited from the past of Europe that does not hold some outpost in the city of Chicago. And while the teeming life and eager interests of that centre may seem to some of us for the present largely a chaos, yet they are undoubtedly making for the revealing of some noble and slow-wrought ideal of human unity, when the days of their ripening shall be fully accomplished.

Such was the psychological area, such the sea of mind, young, tumultuous, overflowing with its own energy and self-assurance, yet inquisitive and alert withal, which confronted Vivekananda when he rose to speak. Behind him, on the contrary, lay an ocean, calm with long ages of spiritual development. Behind him lay a world that dated itself from the Vedas, and remembered itself in the Upanishads, a world to which Buddhism was almost modern; a world that was filled with religious systems of faiths and creeds; a quiet land, steeped in the sunlight of the tropics, the dust of whose roads had been trodden by the feet of the saints for ages upon ages. Behind him, in short, lay India, with her thousands of years of national development, in which she had sounded many things, proved many things, and realised almost all, save only her own perfect unanimity, from end to end of her great expanse of time and space, as to certain fundamental and essential truths, held by all her people in common.

These, then, were the two mind-floods, two immense rivers of thought, as it were, Eastern and modern, of which the yellow-clad wanderer on the platform of the Parliament of Religions formed for a moment the point of confluence. The formulation of the common bases of Hinduism was the inevitable result of the shock of their contact, in a personality, so impersonal. For it was no experience of his own that rose to the lips of the Swami Vivekananda there. He did not even take advantage of the occasion to tell the story of his Master. Instead of either of these, it was the religious consciousness of India that spoke through him, the message of his whole people, as determined by their whole past. And as he spoke, in the youth and noonday of the West, a nation, sleeping in the shadows of the darkened half of earth, on the far side of the Pacific, waited in spirit for the words that would be borne on the dawn that was travelling towards them, to reveal to them the secret of their own greatness and strength.

Others stood beside the Swami Vivekananda, on the same platform as he, as apostles of particular creeds and churches. But it was his glory that he came to preach a religion to which each of these was, in his own words, “only a travelling, a coming up, of different men, and women, through various conditions and circumstances to the same goal”. He stood there, as he declared, to tell of One who had said of them all, not that one or another was true, in this or that respect, or for this or that reason, but that “All these are threaded upon Me, as pearls upon a string. Wherever thou seest extraordinary holiness and extraordinary power, raising and purifying humanity, know thou that I am there.” To the Hindu, says Vivekananda, “Man is not travelling from error to truth, but climbing up from truth to truth, from truth that is lower to truth that is higher.” This, and the teaching of Mukti- the doctrine that “man is to become divine by realising the divine,” that religion is perfected in us only when it has led us to “Him who is the one life in a universe of death, Him who is the constant basis of an ever-changing world, that One who is the only soul, of which all souls are but delusive manifestations” -may be taken as the two great outstanding truths which, authenticated by the longest and most complex experience in human history, India proclaimed through him to the modem world of the West.

For India herself, the short address forms, as has been said, a brief Charter of Enfranchisement. Hinduism in its wholeness the speaker bases on the Vedas, but he spiritualises our conception of the word, even while he utters it. To him, all that is true is Veda. “By the Vedas,” he says, “no books are meant. They mean the accumulated treasury of spiritual laws discovered by different persons in different times.” Incidentally, he discloses his conception of the Sanatana Dharma. “From the high spiritual flights of the Vedanta philosophy, of which the latest discoveries of science seem like echoes, to the lowest ideas of idolatry with its multifarious mythology, the agnosticism of the Buddhists, and the atheism of the Jains, each and all have a place in the Hindu’s religion.” To his mind, there could be no sect, no school, no sincere religious experience of the Indian people-however like an aberration it might seem- to the individual that might rightly be excluded from the embrace of Hinduism. And of this Indian Mother-Church, according to him, the distinctive doctrine is that of the Ishta Devata, the right of each soul to choose its own path, and to seek God in its own way. No army, then, carries the banner of so wide an Empire as that of Hinduism, thus defined. For as her spiritual goal is the finding of God, even so is her spiritual rule the perfect freedom of every soul to be itself.

 

Part-I

CONTENTS
  INTRODUCTION XI
1 ADDRESSES AT THE WORLD'S PARLIAMENT OF RELIGIONS, CHICAGO, 1893 1
2 KARMA YOGA 27
3 RAJA YOGA 117
4 LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  SOUL, GOD AND RELIGION 307
  THE HINDU RELIGION 319
  WHAT IS RELIGION? 323
  VEDIC RELIGIOUS IDEALS 334
  THE VEDANTA PHILOSOPHY 347
  REASON AND RELIGION 356
  VEDANTA AS A FACTOR IN CIVILISATION 373
  THE SPIRIT AND INFLUENCE OF VEDANTA 377
  STEPS OF HINDU PHILOSOPHIC THOUGHT 383
  STEPS TO REALISATION 395
  VEDANTA AND PRIVILEGE 407
  PRIVILEGE 420
  KRISHNA 427
  THE GITA I 435
  THE GITA II 447
  THE GITA III 454
  MOHAMMED 467
  BILVAMANGALA 471
  THE SOUL AND GOD 474
  BREATHING 487
  PRACTICAL RELIGION: BREATHING AND MEDITATION 497
  INDEX 505
Part-II

Contents

 

  WORK AND ITS SECRET 1
  THE POWERS OF THE MIND 10
  HINTS ON PRACTICAL SPIRITUALITY 24
  BHAKTI OR DEVOTION 38
I JNANA-YOGA  
  1. THE NECESSITY OF RELIGION 57
  2. THE REAL NATURE OF MAN 69
  3. MAYA AND ILLUSION 87
  4. MAYA AND THE EVOLUTION OF THE CONCEPTION OF GOD 104
  5. MAYA AND FREEDOM 117
  6.THE ABSOLUTE AND MANIFESTATION 128
  7. GOD IN EVERYTHING 142
  8. REALISATION 153
  9. UNITY IN DIVERSITY 172
  10. THE FREEDOM OF THE SOUL 185
  11. THE COSMOS: THE MACROCOSM 199
  12. THE COSMOS: THE MICROCOSM 208
  13. IMMORTALITY 222
  14. THE ATMAN 234
  15. THE ATMAN: ITS BONDAGE AND FREEDOM 251
  16. THE REAL AND THE APPARENT MAN 257
II PRACTICAL VEDANTA AND OTHER LECTURES  
  PRACTICAL VEDANTA: PART I 285
  PRACTICAL VEDANTA: PART II 302
  PRACTICAL VEDANTA : PART III 320
  PRACTICAL VEDANTA : PART IV 333
  THE WAY TO THE REALISATION OF A UNIVERSAL RELIGION 351
  THE IDEAL OF A UNIVERSAL RELIGION 367
  THE OPEN SECRET 388
  THE WAY TO BLESSEDNESS 396
  YAJNAVALKYA AND MAITREYI 406
  SOUL, NATURE, AND GOD 413
  COSMOLOGY 422
  A STUDY OF THE SANKHYA PHILOSOPHY 432
  SANKHYA A D VEDANTA 443
  THE GOAL 452
III REPORTS IN AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS  
  DIVINITY OF MAN 465
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA ON INDIA 468
  RELIGIOUS HARMONY 471
  FROM FAR OFF INDIA 474
  AN EVENING WITH OUR HINDU COUSINS 476
  THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF INDIA 479
  THE RELIGIONS OF INDIA 481
  SECTS AND DOCTRINES IN INDIA 483
  LESS DOCTRINE AND MORE BREAD 485
  THE RELIGION OF BUDDHA 487
  ALL RELIGIONS ARE GOOD 491
  THE HINDU VIEW OF LIFE 494
  IDEALS OF WOMANHOOD 499
  TRUE BUDDHISM 503
  INDIA'S GIFT TO THE WORLD 506
  CHILD WIDOWS OF INDIA 510
  SOME CUSTOMS OF THE HINDUS 512
  INDEX 516
Part-III

Contents

 

 
LECTURES AND DISCOURSES
 
  UNITY THE GOAL OF RELIGION 1
  THE FREE SOUL 6
  ONE EXISTENCE APPEARING AS MANY 19
 
BHAKTI-YOGA
 
  DEFINITION OF BHAKTI 31
  THE PHILOSOPHY OF ISHVARA 37
  SPIRITUAL REALISATION, THE AIM OF BHAKTI-YOGA 42
  THE NEED OF GURU 45
  QUALIFICATIONS OF THE ASPIRANT AND THE TEACHER 47
  INCARNATE TEACHERS AND INCARNATION 53
  THE MANTRA: OM: WORD AND WISDOM 56
  WORSHIP OF SUBSTITUTES AND IMAGES 59
  THE CHOSEN IDEAL 62
  THE METHOD AND THE MEANS 64
 
PARA-BHAKTI OR SUPREME DEVOTION
 
  THE PREPARATORY RENUNCIATION 70
  THE BHAKTA'S RENUNCIATION RESULTS FROM LOVE 73
  THE NATURALNESS OF BHAKTI-YOGA AND ITS CENTRAL SECRET 77
  THE FORMS OF LOVE-MANIFESTATION 79
  UNIVERSAL LOVE AND HOW IT LEADS TO SELFSURRENDER 81
  THE HIGHER KNOWLEDGE AND THE HIGHER LOVE ARE ONE TO THE TRUE LOVER 85
  THE TRIANGLE OF LOVE 86
  THE GOD OF LOVE IS HIS OWN PROOF 91
  HUMAN REPRESENTATIONS OF THE DIVINE IDEAL OF LOVE 93
  CONCLUSION 99
 
LECTURES FROM COLOMBO TO ALMORA
 
  FIRST PUBLIC LECTURE IN THE EAST (COLOMBO) 103
  VEDANTISM 116
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT PAMBAN 136
  ADDRESS AT THE RAMESWARAM TEMPLE ON REAL WORSHIP 141
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS. OF WELCOME AT RAMNAD 144
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT PARA MAKUDI 155
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT SHlVAGANGA AND MANAMADURA 163
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT MADURA 169
  THE MISSION OF THE VEDANTA 176
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT MADRAS 200
  MY PLAN OF CAMPAIGN 207
  VEDANTA IN ITS APPLICATION TO INDIAN LIFE 228
  THE SAGES OF INDIA 248
  THE WORK BEFORE US 269
  THE FUTURE OF INDIA 285
  ON CHARITY 305
  ADDRESS OF WELCOME PRESENTED AT CALCUTTA AND REPLY 306
  THE VEDANTA IN ALL ITS PHASES 322
  ADDRESS OF WELCOME AT ALMORA AND REPLY 350
  VEDIC TEACHING IN THEORY AND PRACTICE 355
  BHAKTI 357
  THE COMMON BASES OF HINDUISM 366
  BHAKTI 385
  THE VEDANTA 393
  VEDANTISM 434
  THE INFLUENCE OF INDIAN SPIRITUAL THOUGHT IN ENGLAND 440
  SANNYASA: ITS IDEAL AND PRACTICE 446
  WHAT HAVE I LEARNT? 449
  THE RELIGION WE ARE BORN IN 454
 
REPORTS IN AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS
 
  INDIA: HER RELIGION AND CUSTOMS 465
  HINDUS AT THE FAIR 470
  AT THE PARLIAMENT OF RELIGIONS 473
  PERSONAL TRAITS 476
  REINCARNATION 478
  HINDU CIVILISATION 480
  AN INTERESTING LECTURE 481
  THE HINDOO REUGION 481
  THE HINDOO MONK 484
  PLEA FOR TOLERANCE 486
  MANNERS AND CUSTOMS IN INDIA 488
  HINDOO PHILOSOPHY 492
  MIRACLES 495
  THE DIVINITY OF MAN 496
  THE LOVE OF GOD 503
  THE WOMEN OF INDIA 505
  BUDDHISTIC INDIA 511
  INDEX 539
Part-IV

Contents

 

I ADDRESSES ON BHAKTI-YOGA  
  THE PREPARATION 3
  THE FIRST STEPS 12
  THE TEACHER OF SPIRITUALITY 21
  THE NEED OF SYMBOLS 33
  THE CHIEF SYMBOLS 40
  THE ISHTA 51
II LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  THE RAMAYANA 63
  THE MAHABHARATA 77
  THOUGHTS ON THE GITA 100
  THE STORY OF JADA BHARATA 109
  THE STORY OF PRAHLADA 113
  THE GREAT TEACHERS OF THE WORLD 118
  ON LORD BUDDHA 132
  CHRIST, THE MESSENGER 135
  MY MASTER 150
  INDIAN RELIGIOUS THOUGHT 183
  THE BASIS FOR PSYCHIC OR SPIRITUAL RESEARCH 187
  ON ART IN INDIA 191
  IS INDIA A BENIGHTED COUNTRY ? 193
  THE CLAIMS OF RELIGION 198
  CONCENTRATION 212
  MEDITATION 221
  THE PRACTICE OF RELIGION 231
III WRITINGS: PROSE  
  IS THE SOUL IMMORTAL? 245
  REINCARNATION 249
  ON DR. PAUL DEUSSEN 264
  ON PROFESSOR MAX MULLER 270
  SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF PAVHARI BABA 275
  ARYANS AND TAMILIANS 288
  THE SOCIAL CONFERENCE ADDRESS 295
  INDIA'S MESSAGE TO THE WORLD 300
  STRAY REMARKS ON THEOSOPHY 309
  REPLY TO THE ADDRESS OF THE MAHARAJA OF KHETRI 312
  REPLY TO THE MADRAS ADDRESS 323
  A MESSAGE OF SYMPATHY TO A FRIEND 345
  WHAT WE BELIEVE IN 347
  OUR DUTY TO THE MASSES 352
  REPLY TO THE CALCUTTA ADDRESS 356
  TO MY BRAVE BOYS 358
  A PLAN OF WORK FOR INDIA 362
  FUNDAMENTALS OF RELIGION 366
IV WRITINGS: POEMS  
  KALI THE MOTHER 377
  ANGLES UNAWARES 379
  TO THE AWAKENED INDIA 382
  REQUIESCAT IN PACE 384
  HOLD ON YET A WHILE, BRAVE HEART 385
  NIRVANASHATKAM, OR SIX STANZAS ON NIRVANA 387
  THE SONG OF THE SANNYASIN 389
  PEACE 392
V TRANSLATION OF WRITINGS: PROSE  
  THE PROBLEM OF MODERN INDIA AND ITS SOLUTION 397
  RAMAKRISHNA: HIS LIFE AND SAYINGS 407
  THE PARIS CONGRESS OF THE HISTORY OF RELIGIONS 420
  KNOWLEDGE: ITS SOURCE AND ACQUIREMENT 428
  MODERN INDIA 436
  THE EDUCATION THAT INDIA NEEDS 478
  OUR PRESENT SOCIAL PROBLEMS 485
VI TRANSLATION OF WRITINGS: POEMS  
  TO A FRIEND 493
  THE HYMN OF CREATION 497
  THE HYMN OF SAMADHI 499
  A HYMN TO THE DIVINE MOTHER 500
  A HYMN TO SHIVA 503
  A HYMN TO THE DIVINITY OF SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 506
  “AND LET SHYAMA DANCE THERE" 509
  A SONG I SING TO THEE 514
  INDEX 520
Part-V

Contents

 

  EPISTLES-FIRST SERIES 3
 
INTERVIEWS
 
  MIRACLES 183
  AN INDIAN YOGI IN LONDON 185
  INDIA'S MISSION 188
  INDIA AND ENGLAND 194
  INDIAN MISSIONARY'S MISSION TO ENGLAND 201
  WITH THE SWAMI VIVEKANANDA AT MADURA 204
  THE ABROAD AND THE PROBLEMS AT HOME 209
  THE MISSIONARY WORK OF THE FIRST HINDU SANNYASIN TO THE WEST AND HIS PLAN OF REGENERATION OF INDIA 218
  REAWAKENING OF HINDUISM ON A NATIONAL BASIS 225
  ON INDIAN WOMEN-THEIR PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE 228
  ON THE BOUNDS OF HINDUISM 233
 
NOTES FROM LECTURES AND DISCOURSES
 
  ON KARMA-YOGA 239
  ON FANATICISM 242
  WORK IS WORSHIP 245
  WORK WI'IHOUT MOTIVE 246
  SADHANAS OR PREPARATIONS FOR HIGHER LIFE 249
  THE COSMOS AND THE SELF 255
  WHO IS A REAL GURU? 257
  ON ART 258
  ON LANGUAGE 259
  THE SANNYASIN 260
  THE SANNY ASIN AND THE HOUSEHOLDER 260
  THE EVILS OF ADHIKARIVADA 262
  ON BHAKTI-YOGA 265
  ISHVARA AND BRAHMAN 269
  ON JNANA-YOGA 270
  THE CAUSE OF ILLUSION 276
  EVOLUTION 277
  BUDDHISM AND VEDANTA 279
  ON THE VEDANTA PHILOSOPHY 281
  LAW AND FREEDOM 286
  THE GOAL AND METHODS OF REALISAT10N 291
  WORLD-WIDE UNITY 293
  THE AIM OF RAJA-YOGA 293
 
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS
 
I DISCUSSION AT THE GRADUATE PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY OF HARVARD UNIVERSITY 297
II AT THE TWENTEETH CENTURY CLUB OF BOSTON 310
III AT THE BROOKLYN ETIHCAL SOCIETY, BROOKLYN 312
IV SELECT1ONS FROM MATH DIARY 314
V YOGA, VAlRAGYA, TAPASYA, LOVE 319
VI IN ANSWER TO NIVEDITA 320
VII GURU, AVATARA, YOGA, JAPA, SEVA 322
 
CONVERSATIONS AND DIALOGUES
 
I SHRI SURENDRA NATH DAS GUPTA 329
II-V SHRI SURENDRA NATH SEN 332
VI-X SHRI PRIYA NATH SINHA 349
XI-XV FROM THE DIARY OF A DISCIPLE, SHRI SHARAT CHANDRA CHAKRAVARTY 379
  SAYINGS AND UTTERANCES 409
 
WRITINGS: PROSE AND POEMS-Original and Translated
 
  REASON, FAITH, AND LOVE 425
  SIX SANSKRIT MOTTOES 427
  THE MESSAGE OF DIVINE WISDOM  
  I BONDAGE; II THE LAW; III THE ABSOLUTE AND THE A'ITAINMENT OF FREEDOM 428
  THE BELUR MATH: AN APPEAL 434
  THE ADVAlTA ASHRAMA, HIMALAYAS 435
  THE RAMAKRISHNA HOME OF SERVICE, VARANASI: AN APPEAL 436
  WHO KNOWS HOW MOTHER PLAYS 439
  TO THE FOURTH OF JULY 439
  THE EAST AND THE WEST 441
  INDEX 539
Part-VI

Contents

 

I LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  THE METHODS AND PURPOSE OF RELIGION 3
  THE NATURE OF THE SOUL AND ITS GOAL 18
  THE IMPORTANCE OF PSYCHOLOGY 28
  NATURE AND MAN 33
  CONCENTRATION AND BREATHING 37
  INTRODUCTION TO JNANA-YOGA 41
  THE VEDANTA PHILOSOPHY AND CHRISTIANITY 46
  WORSHIPPER AND WORSHIPPED 49
  FORMAL WORSHIP 58
  DIVINE LOVE 68
II NOTES OF CLASS TALKS AND LECTURES  
  RELIGION AND SCIENCE 79
  RELIGION IS REALISATION 81
  RELIGION IS SELF-ABNEGATION 82
  UNSELFISH WORK IS TRUE RENUNCIATION 83
  FREEDOM OF THE SELF 84
  NOTES ON VEDANTA 85
  HINDU AND GREEK 87
  THOUGHTS ON THE VEDAS AND UPANISHADS 88
  ON RAJA-YOGA 91
  ON BHAKTI-YOGA 93
  ON JNANA-YOGA 95
  THE REALITY AND SHADOW 96
  HOW TO BECOME FREE 97
  SOUL AND GOD 99
  THE GOAL 100
  ON PROOF OF RELIGION 101
  THE DESIGN THEORY 104
  SPIRIT AND NATURE 106
  THE PRACTICE OF RELIGION 109
  FRAGMENTARY NOTES ON THE RAMAYANA 111
  NOTES TAKEN DOWN IN MADRAS, 1892-93 113
  CONCENTRATION 133
  THE POWER OF THE MIND 135
  LESSONS ON RAJA-YOGA 138
  LESSONS ON BHAKTI-YOGA 147
  MOTHER-WORSHIP 156
  NARADA-BHAKTI-SUTRAS 162
III WRITINGS: PROSE AND POEMS  
  HISTORICAL EVOLUTION OF INDIA 169
  THE STORY OF THE BOY GOPALA 180
  MY PLAY IS DONE 187
  THE CUP 190
  A BENEDICTION 191
  THE HYMN OF CREATION 192
  ON THE SEA'S BOSOM 194
  HINDUISM AND SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 195
  THE BENGALI LANGUAGE 201
  MATTER FOR SERIOUS THOUGHT 205
  SHIVA'S DEMON 211
IV EPISTLES  
  SERIAL NOS. 1-168 215
V CONVERSATIONS AND DIALOGUES  
  1-12 (From the Diary of a Disciple) 447
  INDEX 519
Part-VII

Contents

 

I INSPIRED TALKS 1
II CONVERSATIONS AND DIAWGUES  
  1-29 (From the Diary of a Disciple) 103
  30-31 (Shri Priyanath Sinha) 256
  32 (Mrs. Wright) 265
  33 (The Appeal-Avalanche) 269
  34 (The Detroit Free Press) 273
  35 (The Detroit Tribune) 277
III TRANSLATIONS OF WRITINGS  
  MEMOIRS OF EUROPEAN TRAVEL 285
IV NOTES OF CLASS TALKS AND LECTURES  
A NOTES OF CLASS TALKS  
  ON ART 393
  ON MUSIC 393
  ON MANTRA AND MANTRA-CHAITANYA 393
  ON CONCEPTIONS OF GODGHEAD 394
  ON FOOD 395
  ON SANNYAS AND FAMILY LIFE 395
  ON QUESTIONING THE COMPETENCY OF THE GURU 396
  SRI RAMAKRISHNA: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF HIS LIFE AND TEACHINGS 397
  ON SRI RAMAKRISHNA AND HIS VIEWS 398
  SRI RAMAKRISHNA: THE NATION'S IDEAL 400
B NOTES OF LECTURES  
  MERCENARIES IN RELIGION 401
  THE DESTINY OF MAN 404
  REINCARNATION 407
  COMPARATIVE THEOLOGY 410
  BUDDHISM, THE RELIGION OF THE LIGHT OF ASIA 413
  THE SCIENCE OF YOGA 414
V EPISTLES 423
  INDEX 504
Part-VIII

Contents

 

  PREFACES III
I LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  DISCOURSES ON JNANA-YOGA 3
  SIX LESSONS ON RAJA-YOGA 34
  WOMEN OF INDIA 50
  MY LIFE AND MISSION 69
  BUDDHA'S MESSAGE TO THE WORLD 87
  DISCIPLESHIP 101
  IS VEDANTA THE FUTURE RELIGION? 116
II WRITINGS: PROSE AND POEMS  
 
PROSE
 
  STRUGGLE FOR EXPANSION 137
  THE BIRTH OF RELIGION 140
  FOUR PATHS OF YOGA 144
  CYCLIC REST AND CHANGE 148
  A PREFACE TO THE IMITATION OF CHRIST 151
 
POEMS
 
  AN INTERESTING CORRESPONDENCE 154
  THOU BLESSED DREAM 159
  LIGHT 160
  THE LIVING GOD 160
  TO AN EARLY VIOLET 161
  TO MY OWN SOUL 161
  THE DANCE OF SHIVA 162
  SHIVA IN ECSTASY 162
  TO SHRI KRISHNA 163
  A HYMN TO SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 163
  A HYMN TO SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 164
III NO ONE TO BLAME 166
  NOTES OF CLASS TALKS AND LECTURES  
  NOTES OF CLASS TALKS 171
  NOTES OF LECTURES 175
  MAN THE MAKER OF HIS DESTINY 175
  GOD: PERSONAL AND IMPERSONAL 180
  THE DIVINE INCARNATION OR AVATARA 182
  PRANAYAMA 184
  WOMEN OF THE EAST 190
  CONGRESS OF RELIGIOUS UNITY 192
  THE LOVE OF GOD-I 193
  THE LOVE OF GOD-II 195
  INDIA 198
  HINDUS AND CHRISTIANS 203
  CHRISTIANITY IN INDIA 208
  THE RELIGION OF LOVE 214
  JNANA AND KARMA 219
  THE CLAIMS OF VEDANTA ON THE MODERN WORLD 224
  THE LAWS OF LIFE AND DEATH 228
  THE REALITY AND THE SHADOW 230
  WAY TO SALVATION 232
  THE PEOPLE OF INDIA 234
  I AM THAT I AM 237
  UNITY 243
  THE WORSHIP OF THE DIVINE MOTHER 245
  THE ESSENCE OF RELIGION 247
IV SAYINGS AND UTTERANCES 253
V EPISTLES - (Fourth Series) 273
  INDEX 509
Part-IX

Contents

 

  PREFACE III
  ACKNOWLEDGEMENT AND ABBREVIATION VI
I EPISTLES  
  SERIAL NOS. 1-238 3
II LECTURES AND DISCOURSES  
  THE WOMEN OF INDIA 207
  THE FIRST STEP TOWARDS JNANA 227
  BHAKTI-YOGA 244
  THE MUNDAKA UPANISHAD 258
  HISTORY OF THE ARYAN RACE 273
III NOTES OF LECTURE AND CLASSES  
  THE RELIGION OF INDIA 293
  CHRIST'S MESSAGE TO THE WORLD 297
  MOHAMMED'S MESSAGE TO THE WORLD 298
  CLASS LESSON IN MEDITION 300
  THE GITA-I 301
  THE GITA-II 303
  THE GITA-III 305
  GITA CLASS 308
  REMARKS FROM VARIOUS LECTURES 309
IV WRITINGS: PROSE AND POEMS  
  THE ETHER 313
  NOTES 318
  LECTURE NOTES 320
  MACROCOSM AND MICROCOSM 322
  FOOTNOTES TO THE IMITATION OF CHRIST 323
  THE PLAGUE MANIFESTO 330
  ONE CIRCLE MORE 333
  AN UNTITLED POEM ON SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 336
  AN UNFINISHED POEM 337
  BHARTRIHARI'S VERSES ON RENUNCIATION 338
V CONVERSTIONS AND INTERVIEWS  
  FIRST MEETING WITH MADAME EMMA CALVE 351
  FIRST MEETING WITH JOHN D. ROCKEFELLER 352
  A DUSKY PHILOSOPHER FROM INDIA 354
  WE ARE HYPNOTIZED INTO WEAKNESS 358
  MARRIAGE 359
  LINE OF DEMARCATION 359
  GOD IS 360
  RENUNCIATION 360
  SHRI RAMAKRISHNA'S DISCIPLE 360
  THE MASTER'S DIVINE INCARNATION 361
  A PRIVATE ADMISSION 361
  A GREETING 361
  "THIS WORLD IS A CIRCUS RING" 361
  ON KALI 362
  TRAINING UNDER SHRI RAMAKRISHNA 362
VI NOTES OF SOME WANDERINGS WITH THE SWAMI VIVEKANANDA  
  FOREWORD 367
  CHAPTER (i): THE HOUSE ON THE GANGES 370
  CHAPTER (ii): AT NAINITAL AND ALMORA 375
  CHAPTER (iii): MORNING TALKS AT ALMORA 379
  CHAPTER (iv): ON THE WAY TO KATHGODAM 393
  CHAPTER (v): ON THE WAY TO BARAMULLA 396
  CHAPTER (vi): THE VALE OF KASHMIR 402
  CHAPTER (vii): LIFE AT SRINAGAR 405
  CHAPTER (viii): THE TEMPLE OF PANDRENTHAN 412
  CHAPTER (ix): WALKS AND TALKS BESIDE THE JHELUM 420
  CHAPTER (x): THE SHRINE OF AMAENATH 427
  CHAPTER (xi): AT SRINAGAR ON THE RETURN JOURNEY 432
  CHAPTER (xii): THE CAMP UNDER THE CHENNAARS 435
  CONCLUDING WORD OF THE EDITOR 440
VII SAYING AND UTTERANCES  
VIII NEWSPAPER REPORTS  
 
PART A: AMERICAN NEWSPAPER REPORTS
 
  RESPONSE TO WELCOME 471
  PARLOR TALK 473
  RELIGIONS OF INDIA 473
  ALL RELIGONS ARE TRUE 476
  A MESSAGE FROM INDIA 478
  REINCARNATION 479
  AN INTELLENCTUAL FEAST 481
  A PRAYER MEETING 482
  ON AMERICAN WOMAN 483
  ON THE BRAHMO SAMAJ 483
  A WITTY HINDU 484
  THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF INDIA 485
  HINDU PHILOSOPHY 487
  A GOD EVERYDAY 489
  VIVE KANANDA LEAVES 490
  CULTURE AT HOME 490
  KANANDA, THE PAGAN 491
  AS THE WAVE FOLLOWS WAVE 499
  WAYSIDE STORIES 500
  A HINDOO MONK 501
  KANANDA ARRIVES 501
  THE MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF INDIA 501
  A LECTURE ON "INDIA AND HINDUISM" 504
  AT SMITH COLLEGE, NORTHAMPTON, MASSACHUSETTS 505
  A LECTURE ON INDIA AND REINCARNATION 505
  LECTURE BY HINDOO MONK 506
  THE BRAHMAN MONK 509
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA 512
  NIRVANASHATKAM 513
  THE NONSENSE OF NATIONS 514
  A HIGH PRIST OF INDIA 515
  PRIST SWAMI IN TOWN 516
  A WISE MAN AMONG US 518
  LOVE RELIGION'S ESSENCE 519
  THE HINDOO OPTIMISTIC 523
  VIVEKANANDA'S LECTURE 524
  LET INDIA ALONE 524
  ABOU BEN ADHEM'S IDEAL 525
  THE DOCTRINE OF THE SWAMI 527
  "UNIVERSAL RELIGION" 528
  VIVEKANANDA'S PHILOSOPHYHY 531
  HEARD SWAMI TALK 532
  PHILOSOPHY OF FREEDOM 533
  OUT OF THE EAST 535
  UNIVERSAL RELIGION IS IMPOSSIBLE 537
  FOR UNIVERSAL RELIGION 537
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA 543
  HINDU PHILOSOPHY 546
  CONCEPTION OF THE UNIVERSE 547
  TOLD ABOUT INDIA 549
  THE RELIGION LEGENDS OF INDIA 551
  THE SCIENCE OF YOGA 552
  AT THE LOS ANGELES HOME 552
  HINDOO MONK LECTURES 554
  VEDANTISM, AND WHAT IT IS AND WHAT IT IS NOT 554
  TRUE RELIGION 556
 
PART B: EUROPEAN NEWSPAPER REPORTS
 
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA ON LOVE 559
  AN INDIAN ASCETIC 562
  NATIVE INDIAN LECTURER AT PRINCES' HALL 563
  THE CHRISTIAN COMMONWEALTH 564
  AN UNIVERSAL RELIGION 565
  EDUCATION 566
  THE VEDANTA PHILOSOPHY 566
  AN OCTOBER CLASS REVIEW 568
 
PART C: INDIAN NEWSPAPER REPORTS
 
  A BENGALI SADHU 570
  THE PARLIAMENT OF RELIGIONS 574
  PARLIAMENT OF RELGIONS IN CHICAGO 575
  ON CHRISTIAN CONVERSTION 576
  THE CENTRAL IDEA OF THE VEDAS 577
  ON THE SEA-VOYAGE MOVEMENT 577
  "BUDDHISM, THE FULFILMENT OF HINDUISM" 580
  INDIAN PHILOSOPHY AND WESTERN SOCIETY 580
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA IN AMERICA 581
  ON EDUCATION 582
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA IN ENGLAND 583
  ON THE SWISS ALPS 586
  "THE IDEAL OF UNIVERSAL RELIGION" 587
  THE BANQUET FOR RANJIT SINJHI 589
  THE MAJLIS IN CAMBRIDGE 590
  VIVEKANANDA IN THE WEST 591
  BHAKTI 592
  OUR MISSION IN AMERICA 592
  SWAMI VIVEKANANDA ON EDUCATION AT BELUR 593
  HINDU WIDOWS 595
  APPENDIX 1: CHRONOLOGICAL INDEC TO LETTERS 597
  APPENDIX 2: ADDRESSEE-WISE INDEX TO LETTERS 622
  APPENDIX 3: ADDRESSEE-WISE NUMBER OF LETTERS 629
  APPENDIX 4: INDEX TO SOURCES OF LETTERS 633
  GLOSSARY 643
  INDEX 649
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