Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Art and Architecture > Cowrie: From Marine Animal To Terrestrial Marvel
Displaying 1056 of 1589         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Cowrie: From Marine Animal To Terrestrial Marvel
Cowrie: From Marine Animal To Terrestrial Marvel
Description
Foreword

The Anthropological Survey of India has been documenting life and cultures of the people of India in general and tribes in particular through collection of objects of material culture, preparation of documentary films, photographs etc. as one of its primary objectives.

In recent years, the Survey proposes to bring out a series of Coffee-Table Book with a view to bringing into relief the anthropological perspective of the creative and aesthetic excellence of the tribes of India for the benefit of general readers. The present publication Cowrie—From Marine Animal to Terrestrial Marvel is third in the series, the other two publications being Hairstyle—Panorama of the Tribal World and Combs—Tribes in India.

The important role of the cowries in the economic transaction of the people of India in the distant past, is well known. In the cultural sphere this aquatic animal has no less significant place. Importance of the cowries can be seen in their close association with ‘‘magico-religious performance, various rituals in the life cycle, recreation, adornment and in tmcny such other areas. Dr (Mrs) Bharati Debi and Shri A. P. Nandan, authors’ of this small informative and interesting Coffee-Table Book deserve special appreciation for drawing our oention to an aspect which was unattended so far.

Hope, this publication would inspire others to search for documentation of many other such aspects of cultural significance of the people of India.

Introduction

The creative human mind has made use of many things from nature that comes in his way, be it living or non-living. Porcelain like shell of small gastropods, commonly known as cowrie, is an example in this regard.

Cowries have been unearthed from Palaeolithic and Neolithic remains in different parts of the world, Proto-historic remains of some Mohenjodaro settlements have produced a few cowries but the purpose and use remains undeciphered. In the later ages cowrie was so extensively used by the tribes and castes that its mention in literature, legends, proverbs, rhymes and riddles is common.

Cowrie is the shell of an invertebrate aquatic creature, Zoologists place it under Phyllum Mollusca and Class Gastropoda. Its generic name, Cypraea might have been derived from the Greek goddess Cypraea, associated with love, beauty and charm, It has a number of species like Cypraea moneto, Cypraea annul, Cypraea arabica, Cypraea cicercula, Cypraea to/pa, Cypraea mappa, Cyproea children! and so on. Shallow tropical water throughout the world especially of the Pacific and the Indian Oceans is the habitat of this animal. Its soft body is enveloped within a hard shell of calcium. Many people in Europe, Africa, America, Asia and the Pacific have used cowrie or use it even now in funeral, marriage or circumcision rites, as hunting and fishing amulet, as sacrificial gift to rivers, springs or trees; as ornament or money.

In ancient China, from the end of second millennium B.C. cowrie was used as. currency to purchase cereals, copper vessels, cloth fabric and other commodities for domestic use. Cowrie was used variously in Japan, Formosa, Fiji, Melanesia, Borneo, Balkan, Scandinavia, Syria, Senegal, Cameroon and Egypt. Cowries were made to represent the eyes of some mummies in Egypt.

In India cowrie was used as currency in markets to purchase general commodities perhaps, during Mauryan Period, Fa-hsien, the Chinese traveller states (399-4llA,D.) that the use of cowrie shells as currency was prevalent in India during the Gupta Period along with currency. In British India the use of cowrie as currency was present in many places. The extensive use of cowrie as currency in India made cowrie a synonym and symbol for money.

It is evident from the report of lbn Battuta (1325-1349 AD.) that cowrie was imported from Maldives to the eastern part of India in exchange of rice, cloth and sundries,

Large scale use of cowrie in daily life as well as for ceremonial purposes and entertainment by the tribes of India living in different geophysical surroundings suggests that cowries were traded regularly in the local markets by traders. The traders mainly used waterways both for inland transport and for the purpose of import as well. However, specific information regarding the route through which the cowries reached the tribes of hill region still remains unexplored.

Cowrie is worn for multifarious purposes irrespective of sex. It is mostly used as ornament decorating both body and hair. It is also used for ornamentation of cloth. Some of the cowrie-studded cloths are indicative of the wearer’s social hierarchy or gallantry.

Cowrie is associated with various beliefs, rites and rituals connected with the important events of life cycle like birth, marriage and death.

Cowrie is used while playing games for recreation or gambliçg. It is extensively used in magico-religious practices. It is considered to be associated with fertility and fecundity. Cowrie is burnt to procure lime and is consumed along with tobacco.

This catalogue highlights the importance of cowrie in the Indian context with special reference to the present day tribes in India.

Contents

Foreword1
Introduction2
Community and states4
Cowries in ornaments5
Dress13
Gallantry and aristocracy18
Life cycle20
Magico-religious practices24
Fertility cult28
Currency28
Play and games29
Utility goods30
Acknowledgements

Cowrie: From Marine Animal To Terrestrial Marvel

Item Code:
NAE254
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2003
Publisher:
Anthropological Survey of India
ISBN:
8185579776
Size:
8.5 inch x 10.5 inch
Pages:
35 (Throughout Color & B/W Illustrations)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 269 gms
Price:
$25.00   Shipping Free
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Cowrie: From Marine Animal To Terrestrial Marvel

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 2521 times since 6th Apr, 2013
Foreword

The Anthropological Survey of India has been documenting life and cultures of the people of India in general and tribes in particular through collection of objects of material culture, preparation of documentary films, photographs etc. as one of its primary objectives.

In recent years, the Survey proposes to bring out a series of Coffee-Table Book with a view to bringing into relief the anthropological perspective of the creative and aesthetic excellence of the tribes of India for the benefit of general readers. The present publication Cowrie—From Marine Animal to Terrestrial Marvel is third in the series, the other two publications being Hairstyle—Panorama of the Tribal World and Combs—Tribes in India.

The important role of the cowries in the economic transaction of the people of India in the distant past, is well known. In the cultural sphere this aquatic animal has no less significant place. Importance of the cowries can be seen in their close association with ‘‘magico-religious performance, various rituals in the life cycle, recreation, adornment and in tmcny such other areas. Dr (Mrs) Bharati Debi and Shri A. P. Nandan, authors’ of this small informative and interesting Coffee-Table Book deserve special appreciation for drawing our oention to an aspect which was unattended so far.

Hope, this publication would inspire others to search for documentation of many other such aspects of cultural significance of the people of India.

Introduction

The creative human mind has made use of many things from nature that comes in his way, be it living or non-living. Porcelain like shell of small gastropods, commonly known as cowrie, is an example in this regard.

Cowries have been unearthed from Palaeolithic and Neolithic remains in different parts of the world, Proto-historic remains of some Mohenjodaro settlements have produced a few cowries but the purpose and use remains undeciphered. In the later ages cowrie was so extensively used by the tribes and castes that its mention in literature, legends, proverbs, rhymes and riddles is common.

Cowrie is the shell of an invertebrate aquatic creature, Zoologists place it under Phyllum Mollusca and Class Gastropoda. Its generic name, Cypraea might have been derived from the Greek goddess Cypraea, associated with love, beauty and charm, It has a number of species like Cypraea moneto, Cypraea annul, Cypraea arabica, Cypraea cicercula, Cypraea to/pa, Cypraea mappa, Cyproea children! and so on. Shallow tropical water throughout the world especially of the Pacific and the Indian Oceans is the habitat of this animal. Its soft body is enveloped within a hard shell of calcium. Many people in Europe, Africa, America, Asia and the Pacific have used cowrie or use it even now in funeral, marriage or circumcision rites, as hunting and fishing amulet, as sacrificial gift to rivers, springs or trees; as ornament or money.

In ancient China, from the end of second millennium B.C. cowrie was used as. currency to purchase cereals, copper vessels, cloth fabric and other commodities for domestic use. Cowrie was used variously in Japan, Formosa, Fiji, Melanesia, Borneo, Balkan, Scandinavia, Syria, Senegal, Cameroon and Egypt. Cowries were made to represent the eyes of some mummies in Egypt.

In India cowrie was used as currency in markets to purchase general commodities perhaps, during Mauryan Period, Fa-hsien, the Chinese traveller states (399-4llA,D.) that the use of cowrie shells as currency was prevalent in India during the Gupta Period along with currency. In British India the use of cowrie as currency was present in many places. The extensive use of cowrie as currency in India made cowrie a synonym and symbol for money.

It is evident from the report of lbn Battuta (1325-1349 AD.) that cowrie was imported from Maldives to the eastern part of India in exchange of rice, cloth and sundries,

Large scale use of cowrie in daily life as well as for ceremonial purposes and entertainment by the tribes of India living in different geophysical surroundings suggests that cowries were traded regularly in the local markets by traders. The traders mainly used waterways both for inland transport and for the purpose of import as well. However, specific information regarding the route through which the cowries reached the tribes of hill region still remains unexplored.

Cowrie is worn for multifarious purposes irrespective of sex. It is mostly used as ornament decorating both body and hair. It is also used for ornamentation of cloth. Some of the cowrie-studded cloths are indicative of the wearer’s social hierarchy or gallantry.

Cowrie is associated with various beliefs, rites and rituals connected with the important events of life cycle like birth, marriage and death.

Cowrie is used while playing games for recreation or gambliçg. It is extensively used in magico-religious practices. It is considered to be associated with fertility and fecundity. Cowrie is burnt to procure lime and is consumed along with tobacco.

This catalogue highlights the importance of cowrie in the Indian context with special reference to the present day tribes in India.

Contents

Foreword1
Introduction2
Community and states4
Cowries in ornaments5
Dress13
Gallantry and aristocracy18
Life cycle20
Magico-religious practices24
Fertility cult28
Currency28
Play and games29
Utility goods30
Acknowledgements
Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Alankar: Ornaments Of The Tribes
by Gopa Chakrabarti
Paperback (Edition: 2003)
Anthropological Survey of India
Item Code: NAE255
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Treasures of The National Museum (New Delhi)
Paperback (Edition: 2015)
Niyogi Books
Item Code: NAK814
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Sacred Dichotomy (Thoughts and Comments on the Duality of Female and Male 
Iconography in South Asia and the Mediterranean)
by Fredrick W. Bunce
Hardcover (Edition: 2006)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDK202
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Tanjore: A Portfolio of Paintings (Set of 6 Frameable Prints)
by Dr. Daljeet
Paperback (Edition: 2010)
Prakash Book India Pvt. Ltd
Item Code: NAF478
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Quilts of India (Timeless Textiles)
by Patrick J. Finn
Hardcover (Edition: 2014)
Niyogi Books
Item Code: NAK502
$125.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Studies in Indian Coins
by D.C. Sirar
Hardcover (Edition: 2008)
Motilal Banarsidass Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IHL044
$40.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Dictionary of Buddhist Iconography: Volume-5 (Haakushu - Jyotisprabha ? Buddha)
by Lokesh Chandra
Hardcover (Edition: 2002)
International Academy of Indian Culture and Aditya Prakashan, New Delhi
Item Code: IDJ723
$135.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

I did receive my order today. Excellent / Quick service. Thank you so much. I liked your service and item.
Sanjay, USA
I just receive my order and I love it. Thank you.
Sulbha, USA
My painting arrived today. It is lovely and even better than I thought it would be. Thank you.
Daphne, Colorado
The level of customer service provided by you was amazing ! No other Indian Web services, except very few, are giving customers this kind of detailed attention. Thanks Exotic India, I got the book yesterday.
Nihal, New Zealand
The Nataraja statue arrived fully intact and is absolutely beautiful. I appreciate the great care that was taken in securely wrapping it. I am very satisfied. I have used a few other websites for Indian goods in the past but this experience was so smooth and the shipping so quick that I will be using Exotic India as my first choice and option in the future.
Benjamin, USA
I just received my order of bala tripura sundari lockets and realized what wonderful service I got,it was prompt polite and attentive.thank you very much I'm very pleased with this.
O. Vogel, USA
Ur website is immensely helpful nd go-to-site for every Modern Day Ayurvedic Physician.The collection of books on Ayurveda u have is amazingly surprising.I feel honoured to have ordered a book from your website for the third time and hope to buy more in future.
Dr Atif Sidiq Bhat
My backorder Parvati Devi statue arrived today, well worth the wait! An astonishingly beautiful exquisite sculpture. I will be a long time customer.
Chad
White Tara statue has been been fully unwrapped. Beautiful and in excellent condition. Now sitting in a Temple, will be filled and consecrated according to tradition -- soon. Thank you for all your assistance. Blessings and Appreciation.
Rev. Richard, USA
I really express my earnest gratitude regarding the service of Exotic India. I really overwhelmed to get my order before 26th Jan. Thank you so much for your excellent customer care service.
Indranil, West Bengal.
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India