Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > History > The Design Development of Indian Architecture
Displaying 2292 of 4954         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
The Design Development of Indian Architecture
The Design Development of Indian Architecture
Description
From back of the Book

The value of illustrative material in the study of visual cannot be over estimated. And in this respect Claude Batley’s The Design Development of Indian Architecture is a pioneering work on Indian architecture which has continued to influence generations of students and scholars of the subject. Although by 1934 when this book was first published, photographic plates were well in use as illustrations yet Batley believed that “however good a photograph may be, it cannot take place of a measured drawing for the student or architect.” And looking at the excellent drawings in the book, one has to agree with his statement.

The collection of measured drawings and details presented in this publication represents an endeavour to meet a need which everyone who has set out to study the elements of Indian Architecture must have felt.

This reprint of The Design Development of Indian Architecture is being presented in a new format while Development of Indian Architecture is being presented in a new format while retaining the original text and illustrations. This seminal work remains most useful for students and scholars of Indian architecture.

Claude Batley (1879 in Ipswich – March 20 1956, Bombay) was an English architect who left for Indian in 1913 and started a successful practice there in 1917 with Gregson and King, a firm of architects which is still extant under the name of Gregson, Batley and King.

He became a visiting professor in the J.J. School of Art in the year 1914, and its principal in the year 1923, a post which he held for the next 20 years.

Among his works are the Bombay Gymkhana (1917), Wakaner House (1933) now the American Consulate, Bombay Central Station (1930), Jinnah House (1935), Round Building (1937), Cusrow Baug in Colaba Causeway (1937-59) and its Agiary, known as The Seth Nusserwanji Hirji Karani Agiary (1938), Bombay Club (1939) now the Nataraj Hotel, Lalbhai House (1942) and Breach Candy Hospital (1950).

He died on 20th of March, 1956 in Bombay Club – the building which he had himself designed.

 

Preface

The collection of measured drawings and details presented in this publication represents an endeavour to meet a need which everyone who has set out to study the elements of Indian Architecture must have felt.

In the histories dealing with that subject, such as the excellent one written by Fergusson, the illustrations must need be small, while the plates contained in the various volumes published by the Archaeological Survey Department of the Government of India, in the well – known Bijapur Portfolio and in other cognate works, are found to deal each with some particular locality or style, and many of them are, if obtainable at all, beyond the means of the average student of architecture. Again, they illustrated, for the most part, only the more monumental and ornate examples in the district with which they each deal, omitting all reference to its smaller domestic architecture, form which, perhaps, the most useful inspiration may be gleaned by architects in connection with their practice in the India of to –day.

Moreover, the works referred to naturally treat architecture rather from the archaeological than from the architectural, or constructional, viewpoint.

There are, certainly, several works illustrating Indian Architecture by means of photographs, but, however good a photograph may be it cannot take the place of a measured drawing for the student or architect.

The plates now presented have all been drawn by my Indian students, for the most part from measured drawings, prepared either by themselves or their fellow – students, while the remainder have been re – drawn, in a somewhat more architectural manner, from various publications issued under the aegis of the Archaeological Department of the Government of India, with the kind permission of Sir John Marshall, Kt., C.I.E., Litt. D., M.A., F.S.A., until recently Director – General of Archaeology in India.

The origin of each measured drawing and the name of the delineator are to be found at the foot of each plate, and I take this opportunity of expressing my gratitude to all those who have thus made the production of the book possible, as well as to Mr. Robert W. Cable, F.R.I.B.A., and Mr. Alexander G. Bond, M.A. (Oxon.), F.R.I.B.A., for their kindness in reading the proofs and for other assistance rendered in connection with its publication.

 

Introductory Note

The value of illustrative material for a study in visual arts cannot be over-estimated. And in this respect Claude Batley’s The Design Development of Indian Architecture is a pioneering work on Indian architecture which has continued to influence generations of students and scholars of well in use as illustrations yet Batley believed that “however good a photograph may be, it cannot take place of a measured drawing for the student or architect.” And looking at the excellent drawing in the book, one has to agree with his statement.

Claude Batley was born in 1879 in Ipswich, some 100 kilometers north – east of London, England. Trained as an architect, he came to India in 1913. The very next year he became a visiting professor in the J.J. School of Arts, Mumbai. He became the principal of the School in the year 1923 and continued to hold this post for the next two decades. During this period he made every effort to make the Diploma Examination in Architecture at this School equal in status to the Diploma of the R.I.B.A. (Royal Institute of British Architects). He took his students on trips to significant architectural sites all over the country where they made measured drawings of monuments. And the book in hand is a collection of the best work done by his students.

The Sir J.J. School of Arts (now Sir J.J. College of Architecture) has kept the memory of Professor and Principal Batley alive by annually conducting “The Claude Batley Lecture Series” to introduce students of architecture to works of contemporary Indian architects. The college also has named after him one of its galleries where the best works of architects are displayed.

Batley was not just a teacher and theoretician but also a practicing architect. In 1917, along with his service, he had started his private practice with the reputed firm of architects – Messers Gregson and King, later rechristened as Messers Gregson, Batley and King. He designed a number of beautiful buildings in Mumbai and Ahmedabad. Working in the Gothic Revival style, he believed in combining indigenous craftsmanship with Western – style planning. The buildings designed by him include the Bombay Gymkhana (1917), Wakaner House) (1933) (now the American Consulate), Bombay Central Station (1930), Jinnah House (1935), Round Building (1937), Bombay Club (1939) (now the Nataraj Hotel), and Breach Candy Hospital (1950). In collaboration with the architect George Witter (1978-1926; the designer of the Prince of Wales Museum and the Gateway of India), he also designed he C- shaped courtyard of the Gothic buildings behind the library of Mumbai University. The Town Hall and Lalbhai’s House at Ahmedabad are also his works.

Considering the historical significance of the buildings designed by Batley, his works in Mumbai were documented, during August 2000 – October 2000, by Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute of Architecture and Environmental Studies.

Batley not only designed individual building but also showed a deep concern for the overall built environment of Mumbai. He vehemently protested that the Art Deco buildings at Marine Drive blocked the sea – breeze for houses of low height in less – privileged areas.

He died on 20th of March, 1956 in Bombay Club – the building which he had himself designed.

The first edition of the Claude Batley’s book The Design Development of Indian Architecture was published more than seven decades back in 1934 by Messers John Tiranti Ltd. of London. Its sustained popularity with the readers is testified by its several reprints. This latest reprint by Aryan Books International, New Delhi, being presented in a new format, deserves appreciation by the students and scholars of Indian architectures.

 

Contents

 

  Agra: Plate
  Arcaded gallery 40
  Taj Mahal 3
  Ahmedabad:  
  Doorway, Daya Halima’s Tomb 19
  Jali, Daya Halima’s Tomb 20
  Juma Masjid 9
  Mosque at Asarwa 14
  Pulpit, Ahmed Shah’s Mosque 13
  Rani Sipri’s Masjid 9 and 17
  Sluices 24
  Tombs 21 and 22
  Well at Asarwa 15
  Window, Daya Halima’s Tomb 18
  Arcade:  
  Agra 49
  Ahmedabad 23
  Bijapur 26 and 27
  Gwalior 44
  Trimbak 11
  Udaipur 50
  Arch 18, 23, 27, 29, 40, 41, 44, 49
  Ardhachandra (Half – Moon)l the semicircular projecting step before the entrance doorway to a shrine 19
  Balcony 12, 23, 25, 30, 36, 49, 50, 51
  Banavasi, Column from 7
  Bankapur 7 and 8
  Baroda, Bhaskarrao Vithal’s house at 38 and 39
  Bauri, a large well with steps and underground resting recesses around its shaft (see Well)  
  Bases 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 13, 14, 15, 31, 40, 41, 44
  Bathing – Place at Trimbak 11
  Bhor, see Poona  
  Bijapur:  
  Balcony, Ibrahim’s mosque 30
  Ceilings 31 and 32
  Malika Jahan’s mosque 27 and 28
  Mecca mosque 26
  Two Sisters domes 29
  Brackets 9, 12, 13, 14, 18, 25, 26, 28, 29, 30, 35, 36, 40, 41, 45, 48, 51
  Brindaban, near Muttra, Temple 12
  Buddhist, Columns at Karli, Bombay Presidency 4
  Capitals 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 24, 25, 31, 35, 36, 41, 44, 49
  Ceilings In:  
  Ahmedabad 13
  Bijapur 31
  Fatehpur - Sikri 48
  Kashmir 43
  Chajja (weather shade) 6, 8, 9, 12, 14, 15, 19, 23, 25, 27, 28, 29, 35, 45, 48, 49
  Chalukyan (central Indian style) 7 and 8
  Champanir:  
  Balcony at 25
  Mosque at 3
  Chatri (Pavilion) 15, 24, 45, 50
  Chowk (open court) 1, 34, 36, 38, 42
  City:  
  Delhi palace 3
  Jaipur 3
  Colonnade 23
  Column 4,5,6,7,9,13,14,15,23,24,25,31,35,36,40,41,48,49
  Delhi, palace at 3
  Tomb at 33
  Dome 12,14,15,26,27,29
  Domestic Work, see House, etc.  
  Door 35,37,40,41,43
  Door - Knob 35, 37
  Doorway 19, 44, 51
  Dravidian (South Indian style) 6
  Eaves - Board 40, 48
  Ellora, Column from 5
  Enrichment of:  
  Balcony, etc., Brindaban 12
  Base 44
  Brackets 12, 25, 26, 28, 30, 36, 40, 35 and 48
  Buttress 24
  Ceilings (stone) 31, (plaster) 33, (wood) 32 and 43
  Chajjas 28 and 48
  Columns 5, 24 and 48
  Cornices 8,9,14,16,28 and 44
  Doors 37 and 43
  Doorways 17, 19 and 44
  Finial 12
  Mouldings 10, 14 and 16
  Niche (Mihrab) 17
  Panelling 20 and 49
  Parapets 9, 10, 14, 16, 27 and 30
  Plinths 10 and 11
  Screen 43
  Shaft, Ellora 5
  Stone surface 47 and 48
  Tombs 21 and 22
  Wall Surface 18 and 44
  Window 18
  Entablature 4, 8, 9, 15, 23, 24
  Fatehpur – Sikri, Pavilions at 45, 46, 48
  Finial (Kalasha) 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30
  Gabhara, see Shrine  
  Gallery (overhanging) 36, 41
  “(arcaded) 49
  Garden At:  
  Agra 3
  Delhi 3
  Gateway at Udaipur 50
  Ghat, see Bathing - Place  
  Goakh, see Niche  
  Gopuram (temple gateway) at Trichinopoly 2
  Gwalior, Man Mandin Palace at 44
  Hip of Chajja 8
  House At:  
  Baroda, Central India 38 and 39
  Kashmir, North India 42 and 43
  Madura, South India 34 and 35
  Nasik, Central India 36
  Inlay:  
  Marble, black and white, Ahmedabad 22
  Jain Temple At:  
  Girnar 1
  Ranakpur 1
  Jaipur, Town – plan of 2
  Jali (perforated stone screen or windos) 18, 20, 23, 40, 43, 44, 47 (celing), 49, 50, 51, 52
  Karli, Column from 4
  Kashmir, House at 42 and 43
  Kings’ Tomb, Ahmedabad 21
  Kulbarga, Mosque at 3
  Kundgol, Chajja from 8
  Liwan, the covered portion, or prayer hall, of an Indian Mosque, see Mosque  
  Madras, Temple in Presidency of 2
  Madura, Rajaram Rao’s House 34 and 35
  Mandapam (columned hall for prayer or shelter) At:  
  Trichinopoly 2
  Trimbak 10
  Masjid, see Mosque  
  Mihrab (sacred recess in west wall of an Indian Mosque), see  
  Niche  
  Mimbar, see Pulpit  
  Minaret (small tower, or pinnacle) 27, 29, 30
  Mosque 3,9,13,14,25,26,27,28
  Mouldings 16
  Nandi (Shiva’s sacred bull) 10
  Nasik. Bathing - place 11
  Jathar’s wada 36
  Temple 10
  Newel 13
  Niche, Goakh (Hindu) 10
  Mihrab (Mohamedan) 17
  Order:  
  Ancient Hindu 5
  Buddhist 4
  Chalukyan 7 and 8
  Dravidian 6
  Indo - Mohamedan 9,15,23,25
  Palace At Delhi 3
  Panelling (stone perforation) 20, (ceilings) 31, 32
  (Wood railing) 40, (wood screen) 43, (stone surface) 47, 51 47, 51
  Parapet From:  
  Ahmedabad 9
  Bankapur 8
  Bankapur 27 and 30
  Bijapur 25
  Champanir 10
  Udaipur 50 and 51
  Vijayanagar 6
  Pavilion (see also Chatri) 45, 46, 48
  Planning:  
  Bathing – place. Trimbak, Nasik 11
  Chatri. Asarwa, Ahmedabad 15
  Garden. Taj Mahal, Agra 3
  Houses. Baroda 38
  Madura 34
  Nasik 36
  Srinagar, Kashmir 42
  Mosques. Ahmedabad 13 and 14
  Bijapur 26 and 27
  Champanir 3
  Kulbarga 3
  Palace. Delhi 3
  Palace Pavilions, Fatepur - Sikri 45, 46 and 48
  Sluice, Ahmedabad 24
  Temples. (Jain) Girnar and Ranakpur 1
  (Hindu) Brindaban 12
  Trichinopoly 2
  Vijayanagar 6
  Planning – (cont.)  
  Tomb Chambers. Agra 3
  Bijapur 3 and 29
  Town. Jaipur, Rajputana 2
  Plinth From:  
  Bankapur 8
  Brindaban 12
  Trimbak 10 and 11
  Vijayanagar 6
  Poona, Chief of Bhor’s Place, near 40 and 41
  Porch, Trimbak Temple 10
  Pulpit (Mimbar) 13
  Queen’s Tombs, Ahmedabad 22
  Railing 13, 24, 36, 40, 41, 49
  Roofs 48
  Sarkhej, Colonnade 23
  Screen 43
  Shrine (Gabhara) 10 and 12
  Sikhara, see Spire  
  Sluice 24
  Soffits 7, 44, 48
  Spire (Sikhara)  
  Spire, diagram of 1
  Trimbak, Temple near Nasik 10
  Trimbak, Bathing - place 11
  Srinagar, Radha Krishna Kand’s House 42 and 43
  Stairs 13, 34, 45, 46
  Stambha (pillar), see Column  
  Steps 13, 34, 45, 46
  Taj Mahal, Agra 3
  Temple:  
  At Brindaban (late Chalukyan) 12
  At Girnar, Gujarat (Jain) 1
  At Ranakpur, Jodhpur (Jain) 1
  At Trimbak, near Nasik (Indo – Aryan) 10
  At Vijayanagar (Dravidian) 6
  Near Trichinopoly (Dravidian) 2
  Timber Construction) 34, 35, 36, 39, 40, 43
  Tirthankar (Jain), the incarnations of the holy  
  Teacher of the Jains, thirteen have occurred and another twelve are to come 1
  Tombs At:  
  Agra 3
  Ahmedabad 21 and 22
  Bijapur 3 and 29
  Town – Planning At:  
  Delhi 3
  Jaipur 2
  Trichinopoly, Temple near 3
  Trimbak, near Nasik:  
  Bathing – place at 11
  Temple at 10
  Tympanum 44
  Udaipur:  
  Balcony, Dalpar Singh’s House 51
  Doorway, Dalpar Singh’s House 51
  Gateway, Gan Ghore Ghat Palace 50
  Jali, Gan Ghore Ghat Palace 52
  Vault 13, 26, 29
  Verandah 26, 29
  Verandah 11, 40, 45, 48
  Vijayandaga, Temple and details from 6
  Wai. Sirdar Raste’s Wada 37
  Water, dams 24
  Well 15
  Window 18, 41
  Yali, sculptured guardian – figures of horses, lions, etc.,  
  before the columns of South Indian Temples 6

Sample Page

The Design Development of Indian Architecture

Item Code:
IHL156
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2009
ISBN:
9788173053801
Language:
English
Size:
15.0 InchX 11.5 Inch
Pages:
82
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 950 gms
Price:
$40.00
Discounted:
$32.00   Shipping Free
You Save:
$8.00 (20%)
Notify me when this item is available
Notify me when this item is available
You will be notified when this item is available
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
The Design Development of Indian Architecture

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 9881 times since 11th Sep, 2015
From back of the Book

The value of illustrative material in the study of visual cannot be over estimated. And in this respect Claude Batley’s The Design Development of Indian Architecture is a pioneering work on Indian architecture which has continued to influence generations of students and scholars of the subject. Although by 1934 when this book was first published, photographic plates were well in use as illustrations yet Batley believed that “however good a photograph may be, it cannot take place of a measured drawing for the student or architect.” And looking at the excellent drawings in the book, one has to agree with his statement.

The collection of measured drawings and details presented in this publication represents an endeavour to meet a need which everyone who has set out to study the elements of Indian Architecture must have felt.

This reprint of The Design Development of Indian Architecture is being presented in a new format while Development of Indian Architecture is being presented in a new format while retaining the original text and illustrations. This seminal work remains most useful for students and scholars of Indian architecture.

Claude Batley (1879 in Ipswich – March 20 1956, Bombay) was an English architect who left for Indian in 1913 and started a successful practice there in 1917 with Gregson and King, a firm of architects which is still extant under the name of Gregson, Batley and King.

He became a visiting professor in the J.J. School of Art in the year 1914, and its principal in the year 1923, a post which he held for the next 20 years.

Among his works are the Bombay Gymkhana (1917), Wakaner House (1933) now the American Consulate, Bombay Central Station (1930), Jinnah House (1935), Round Building (1937), Cusrow Baug in Colaba Causeway (1937-59) and its Agiary, known as The Seth Nusserwanji Hirji Karani Agiary (1938), Bombay Club (1939) now the Nataraj Hotel, Lalbhai House (1942) and Breach Candy Hospital (1950).

He died on 20th of March, 1956 in Bombay Club – the building which he had himself designed.

 

Preface

The collection of measured drawings and details presented in this publication represents an endeavour to meet a need which everyone who has set out to study the elements of Indian Architecture must have felt.

In the histories dealing with that subject, such as the excellent one written by Fergusson, the illustrations must need be small, while the plates contained in the various volumes published by the Archaeological Survey Department of the Government of India, in the well – known Bijapur Portfolio and in other cognate works, are found to deal each with some particular locality or style, and many of them are, if obtainable at all, beyond the means of the average student of architecture. Again, they illustrated, for the most part, only the more monumental and ornate examples in the district with which they each deal, omitting all reference to its smaller domestic architecture, form which, perhaps, the most useful inspiration may be gleaned by architects in connection with their practice in the India of to –day.

Moreover, the works referred to naturally treat architecture rather from the archaeological than from the architectural, or constructional, viewpoint.

There are, certainly, several works illustrating Indian Architecture by means of photographs, but, however good a photograph may be it cannot take the place of a measured drawing for the student or architect.

The plates now presented have all been drawn by my Indian students, for the most part from measured drawings, prepared either by themselves or their fellow – students, while the remainder have been re – drawn, in a somewhat more architectural manner, from various publications issued under the aegis of the Archaeological Department of the Government of India, with the kind permission of Sir John Marshall, Kt., C.I.E., Litt. D., M.A., F.S.A., until recently Director – General of Archaeology in India.

The origin of each measured drawing and the name of the delineator are to be found at the foot of each plate, and I take this opportunity of expressing my gratitude to all those who have thus made the production of the book possible, as well as to Mr. Robert W. Cable, F.R.I.B.A., and Mr. Alexander G. Bond, M.A. (Oxon.), F.R.I.B.A., for their kindness in reading the proofs and for other assistance rendered in connection with its publication.

 

Introductory Note

The value of illustrative material for a study in visual arts cannot be over-estimated. And in this respect Claude Batley’s The Design Development of Indian Architecture is a pioneering work on Indian architecture which has continued to influence generations of students and scholars of well in use as illustrations yet Batley believed that “however good a photograph may be, it cannot take place of a measured drawing for the student or architect.” And looking at the excellent drawing in the book, one has to agree with his statement.

Claude Batley was born in 1879 in Ipswich, some 100 kilometers north – east of London, England. Trained as an architect, he came to India in 1913. The very next year he became a visiting professor in the J.J. School of Arts, Mumbai. He became the principal of the School in the year 1923 and continued to hold this post for the next two decades. During this period he made every effort to make the Diploma Examination in Architecture at this School equal in status to the Diploma of the R.I.B.A. (Royal Institute of British Architects). He took his students on trips to significant architectural sites all over the country where they made measured drawings of monuments. And the book in hand is a collection of the best work done by his students.

The Sir J.J. School of Arts (now Sir J.J. College of Architecture) has kept the memory of Professor and Principal Batley alive by annually conducting “The Claude Batley Lecture Series” to introduce students of architecture to works of contemporary Indian architects. The college also has named after him one of its galleries where the best works of architects are displayed.

Batley was not just a teacher and theoretician but also a practicing architect. In 1917, along with his service, he had started his private practice with the reputed firm of architects – Messers Gregson and King, later rechristened as Messers Gregson, Batley and King. He designed a number of beautiful buildings in Mumbai and Ahmedabad. Working in the Gothic Revival style, he believed in combining indigenous craftsmanship with Western – style planning. The buildings designed by him include the Bombay Gymkhana (1917), Wakaner House) (1933) (now the American Consulate), Bombay Central Station (1930), Jinnah House (1935), Round Building (1937), Bombay Club (1939) (now the Nataraj Hotel), and Breach Candy Hospital (1950). In collaboration with the architect George Witter (1978-1926; the designer of the Prince of Wales Museum and the Gateway of India), he also designed he C- shaped courtyard of the Gothic buildings behind the library of Mumbai University. The Town Hall and Lalbhai’s House at Ahmedabad are also his works.

Considering the historical significance of the buildings designed by Batley, his works in Mumbai were documented, during August 2000 – October 2000, by Kamla Raheja Vidyanidhi Institute of Architecture and Environmental Studies.

Batley not only designed individual building but also showed a deep concern for the overall built environment of Mumbai. He vehemently protested that the Art Deco buildings at Marine Drive blocked the sea – breeze for houses of low height in less – privileged areas.

He died on 20th of March, 1956 in Bombay Club – the building which he had himself designed.

The first edition of the Claude Batley’s book The Design Development of Indian Architecture was published more than seven decades back in 1934 by Messers John Tiranti Ltd. of London. Its sustained popularity with the readers is testified by its several reprints. This latest reprint by Aryan Books International, New Delhi, being presented in a new format, deserves appreciation by the students and scholars of Indian architectures.

 

Contents

 

  Agra: Plate
  Arcaded gallery 40
  Taj Mahal 3
  Ahmedabad:  
  Doorway, Daya Halima’s Tomb 19
  Jali, Daya Halima’s Tomb 20
  Juma Masjid 9
  Mosque at Asarwa 14
  Pulpit, Ahmed Shah’s Mosque 13
  Rani Sipri’s Masjid 9 and 17
  Sluices 24
  Tombs 21 and 22
  Well at Asarwa 15
  Window, Daya Halima’s Tomb 18
  Arcade:  
  Agra 49
  Ahmedabad 23
  Bijapur 26 and 27
  Gwalior 44
  Trimbak 11
  Udaipur 50
  Arch 18, 23, 27, 29, 40, 41, 44, 49
  Ardhachandra (Half – Moon)l the semicircular projecting step before the entrance doorway to a shrine 19
  Balcony 12, 23, 25, 30, 36, 49, 50, 51
  Banavasi, Column from 7
  Bankapur 7 and 8
  Baroda, Bhaskarrao Vithal’s house at 38 and 39
  Bauri, a large well with steps and underground resting recesses around its shaft (see Well)  
  Bases 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 13, 14, 15, 31, 40, 41, 44
  Bathing – Place at Trimbak 11
  Bhor, see Poona  
  Bijapur:  
  Balcony, Ibrahim’s mosque 30
  Ceilings 31 and 32
  Malika Jahan’s mosque 27 and 28
  Mecca mosque 26
  Two Sisters domes 29
  Brackets 9, 12, 13, 14, 18, 25, 26, 28, 29, 30, 35, 36, 40, 41, 45, 48, 51
  Brindaban, near Muttra, Temple 12
  Buddhist, Columns at Karli, Bombay Presidency 4
  Capitals 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15, 24, 25, 31, 35, 36, 41, 44, 49
  Ceilings In:  
  Ahmedabad 13
  Bijapur 31
  Fatehpur - Sikri 48
  Kashmir 43
  Chajja (weather shade) 6, 8, 9, 12, 14, 15, 19, 23, 25, 27, 28, 29, 35, 45, 48, 49
  Chalukyan (central Indian style) 7 and 8
  Champanir:  
  Balcony at 25
  Mosque at 3
  Chatri (Pavilion) 15, 24, 45, 50
  Chowk (open court) 1, 34, 36, 38, 42
  City:  
  Delhi palace 3
  Jaipur 3
  Colonnade 23
  Column 4,5,6,7,9,13,14,15,23,24,25,31,35,36,40,41,48,49
  Delhi, palace at 3
  Tomb at 33
  Dome 12,14,15,26,27,29
  Domestic Work, see House, etc.  
  Door 35,37,40,41,43
  Door - Knob 35, 37
  Doorway 19, 44, 51
  Dravidian (South Indian style) 6
  Eaves - Board 40, 48
  Ellora, Column from 5
  Enrichment of:  
  Balcony, etc., Brindaban 12
  Base 44
  Brackets 12, 25, 26, 28, 30, 36, 40, 35 and 48
  Buttress 24
  Ceilings (stone) 31, (plaster) 33, (wood) 32 and 43
  Chajjas 28 and 48
  Columns 5, 24 and 48
  Cornices 8,9,14,16,28 and 44
  Doors 37 and 43
  Doorways 17, 19 and 44
  Finial 12
  Mouldings 10, 14 and 16
  Niche (Mihrab) 17
  Panelling 20 and 49
  Parapets 9, 10, 14, 16, 27 and 30
  Plinths 10 and 11
  Screen 43
  Shaft, Ellora 5
  Stone surface 47 and 48
  Tombs 21 and 22
  Wall Surface 18 and 44
  Window 18
  Entablature 4, 8, 9, 15, 23, 24
  Fatehpur – Sikri, Pavilions at 45, 46, 48
  Finial (Kalasha) 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 30
  Gabhara, see Shrine  
  Gallery (overhanging) 36, 41
  “(arcaded) 49
  Garden At:  
  Agra 3
  Delhi 3
  Gateway at Udaipur 50
  Ghat, see Bathing - Place  
  Goakh, see Niche  
  Gopuram (temple gateway) at Trichinopoly 2
  Gwalior, Man Mandin Palace at 44
  Hip of Chajja 8
  House At:  
  Baroda, Central India 38 and 39
  Kashmir, North India 42 and 43
  Madura, South India 34 and 35
  Nasik, Central India 36
  Inlay:  
  Marble, black and white, Ahmedabad 22
  Jain Temple At:  
  Girnar 1
  Ranakpur 1
  Jaipur, Town – plan of 2
  Jali (perforated stone screen or windos) 18, 20, 23, 40, 43, 44, 47 (celing), 49, 50, 51, 52
  Karli, Column from 4
  Kashmir, House at 42 and 43
  Kings’ Tomb, Ahmedabad 21
  Kulbarga, Mosque at 3
  Kundgol, Chajja from 8
  Liwan, the covered portion, or prayer hall, of an Indian Mosque, see Mosque  
  Madras, Temple in Presidency of 2
  Madura, Rajaram Rao’s House 34 and 35
  Mandapam (columned hall for prayer or shelter) At:  
  Trichinopoly 2
  Trimbak 10
  Masjid, see Mosque  
  Mihrab (sacred recess in west wall of an Indian Mosque), see  
  Niche  
  Mimbar, see Pulpit  
  Minaret (small tower, or pinnacle) 27, 29, 30
  Mosque 3,9,13,14,25,26,27,28
  Mouldings 16
  Nandi (Shiva’s sacred bull) 10
  Nasik. Bathing - place 11
  Jathar’s wada 36
  Temple 10
  Newel 13
  Niche, Goakh (Hindu) 10
  Mihrab (Mohamedan) 17
  Order:  
  Ancient Hindu 5
  Buddhist 4
  Chalukyan 7 and 8
  Dravidian 6
  Indo - Mohamedan 9,15,23,25
  Palace At Delhi 3
  Panelling (stone perforation) 20, (ceilings) 31, 32
  (Wood railing) 40, (wood screen) 43, (stone surface) 47, 51 47, 51
  Parapet From:  
  Ahmedabad 9
  Bankapur 8
  Bankapur 27 and 30
  Bijapur 25
  Champanir 10
  Udaipur 50 and 51
  Vijayanagar 6
  Pavilion (see also Chatri) 45, 46, 48
  Planning:  
  Bathing – place. Trimbak, Nasik 11
  Chatri. Asarwa, Ahmedabad 15
  Garden. Taj Mahal, Agra 3
  Houses. Baroda 38
  Madura 34
  Nasik 36
  Srinagar, Kashmir 42
  Mosques. Ahmedabad 13 and 14
  Bijapur 26 and 27
  Champanir 3
  Kulbarga 3
  Palace. Delhi 3
  Palace Pavilions, Fatepur - Sikri 45, 46 and 48
  Sluice, Ahmedabad 24
  Temples. (Jain) Girnar and Ranakpur 1
  (Hindu) Brindaban 12
  Trichinopoly 2
  Vijayanagar 6
  Planning – (cont.)  
  Tomb Chambers. Agra 3
  Bijapur 3 and 29
  Town. Jaipur, Rajputana 2
  Plinth From:  
  Bankapur 8
  Brindaban 12
  Trimbak 10 and 11
  Vijayanagar 6
  Poona, Chief of Bhor’s Place, near 40 and 41
  Porch, Trimbak Temple 10
  Pulpit (Mimbar) 13
  Queen’s Tombs, Ahmedabad 22
  Railing 13, 24, 36, 40, 41, 49
  Roofs 48
  Sarkhej, Colonnade 23
  Screen 43
  Shrine (Gabhara) 10 and 12
  Sikhara, see Spire  
  Sluice 24
  Soffits 7, 44, 48
  Spire (Sikhara)  
  Spire, diagram of 1
  Trimbak, Temple near Nasik 10
  Trimbak, Bathing - place 11
  Srinagar, Radha Krishna Kand’s House 42 and 43
  Stairs 13, 34, 45, 46
  Stambha (pillar), see Column  
  Steps 13, 34, 45, 46
  Taj Mahal, Agra 3
  Temple:  
  At Brindaban (late Chalukyan) 12
  At Girnar, Gujarat (Jain) 1
  At Ranakpur, Jodhpur (Jain) 1
  At Trimbak, near Nasik (Indo – Aryan) 10
  At Vijayanagar (Dravidian) 6
  Near Trichinopoly (Dravidian) 2
  Timber Construction) 34, 35, 36, 39, 40, 43
  Tirthankar (Jain), the incarnations of the holy  
  Teacher of the Jains, thirteen have occurred and another twelve are to come 1
  Tombs At:  
  Agra 3
  Ahmedabad 21 and 22
  Bijapur 3 and 29
  Town – Planning At:  
  Delhi 3
  Jaipur 2
  Trichinopoly, Temple near 3
  Trimbak, near Nasik:  
  Bathing – place at 11
  Temple at 10
  Tympanum 44
  Udaipur:  
  Balcony, Dalpar Singh’s House 51
  Doorway, Dalpar Singh’s House 51
  Gateway, Gan Ghore Ghat Palace 50
  Jali, Gan Ghore Ghat Palace 52
  Vault 13, 26, 29
  Verandah 26, 29
  Verandah 11, 40, 45, 48
  Vijayandaga, Temple and details from 6
  Wai. Sirdar Raste’s Wada 37
  Water, dams 24
  Well 15
  Window 18, 41
  Yali, sculptured guardian – figures of horses, lions, etc.,  
  before the columns of South Indian Temples 6

Sample Page

Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

The Spirit of Indian Architecture: Vedantic Wisdom of Architecture for Building Harmonious Spaces and Life
by D.K. Bubbar
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAE313
$135.00$108.00
You save: $27.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
5000 Years of Indian Architecture
Item Code: IDJ904
$15.00$12.00
You save: $3.00 (20%)
SOLD
Visvakarma (Examples of Indian Architecture, Sculpture, Painting, Handicraft)
Item Code: IDD901
$35.00$28.00
You save: $7.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Elements of Indian Art:  Including Temple Architecture, Iconography and Iconometry
Item Code: IDI055
$27.00$21.60
You save: $5.40 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Studies in South Indian Architecture (With Special Reference to Kerala and Tamil Nadu)
by K.G. Sreelekha
Hardcover (Edition: 2015)
Dev Publishers and Distributors
Item Code: NAK143
$30.00$24.00
You save: $6.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Elephant Kingdom (Sculptures from Indian Architecture)
by Vikramajit Ram
Paperback (Edition: 2007)
Mapin Publishing Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAK162
$75.00$60.00
You save: $15.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Early Indian Architecture (Cities and City-gate)
Item Code: IAB72
$25.00$20.00
You save: $5.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Indian Architecture: According to Manasara-Silpasastra (Manasara Series: 

Vol.II)
Item Code: IDF745
$19.50$15.60
You save: $3.90 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Torana in Indian and Southeast Asian Architecture
by Parul Pandya Dhar
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IHF076
$155.00$124.00
You save: $31.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Power of The Female: Devangana Sculptures on Indian Temple Architecture
Deal 10% Off
Item Code: NAF484
$105.00$75.60
You save: $29.40 (10 + 20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

As ever, brilliant price and service.
Howard, UK.
The best and fastest service worldwide - I am in Australia and I put in a big order of books (14 items) on a Wednesday; it was sent on Friday and arrived at my doorstep early on Monday morning - amazing! All very securely packed in a very strong cardboard box. I have bought several times from Exotic India and the service is always exceptionally good. THANK YOU and NAMASTE!
Charles (Rudra)
I just wanted to say that this is I think my 3rd (big) order from you, and the last two times I received immaculate service, the books arrived well and it has been a very pleasant experience. Just wanted to say thanks for your efficient service.
Shantala, Belgium
Thank you so much EXOTIC INDIA for the wonderfull packaging!! I received my order today and it was gift wrapped with so much love and taste in a beautiful golden gift wrap and everything was neat and beautifully packed. Also my order came very fast... i am impressed! Besides selling fantastic items, you provide an exceptional customer service and i will surely purchase again from you! I am very glad and happy :) Thank you, Salma
Salma, Canada.
Artwork received today. Very pleased both with the product quality and speed of delivery. Many thanks for your help.
Carl, UK.
I wanted to let you know how happy we are with our framed pieces of Shree Durga and Shree Kali. Thank you and thank your framers for us. By the way, this month we offered a Puja and Yagna to the Ardhanarishwara murti we purchased from you last November. The Brahmin priest, Shree Vivek Godbol, who was visiting LA preformed the rites. He really loved our murti and thought it very paka. I am so happy to have found your site , it is very paka and trustworthy. Plus such great packing and quick shipping. Thanks for your service Vipin, it is a pleasure.
Gina, USA
My marble statue of Durga arrived today in perfect condition, it's such a beautiful statue. Thanks again for giving me a discount on it, I'm always very pleased with the items I order from you. You always have the best quality items.
Charles, Tennessee
Jay Shree Krishna Shrimud Bhagavatam Mahapurana in Sanskrat Parayana is very very thankful to you we are so gratefully to your seva
Mrs. Darbar, UK.
Its a very efficient website and questions queries are responded promptly. very reliable website. Thank you.
Kailash, Australia.
Beautiful and amazing products. Super quality
Vraja, USA
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India