Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Buddhist > Elements of Buddhist Iconography
Displaying 672 of 1682         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Elements of Buddhist Iconography
Pages from the book
Elements of Buddhist Iconography
Look Inside the Book
Description

From the Jacket:

The present work is an analysis of Buddhist symbolism in historical perspective. In author's view Buddhist symbolism, in art and religion, is but a part of the main current of Indian religion and art and has to be studied in that context. Early Indian art is, thus, essentially the continuation of a mainly aniconic "Vedic" style and the compositions are comprehensible only with reference to Vedic notions. The present work studies the fundamental elements of Buddhist symbolism which predominate in the early aniconic art and are never dispensed with in the later imagery, though they are subordinated to the "human" icon. "The present study is divided into two parts: in part I, the tree of life, earth-lotus and world-wheel (and other cognate symbols) have been analyzed; part II deals with the place of the lotus-throne. A study of these reveals that they represent a universal Indian symbolism and set of theological concepts.

 

About the Author

Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy the greatest among the Indian Art historians was born in Colombo on August 22, 1877 After graduating from the University of London he became the director of the Mieralogical Survey of Ceylon. Between 1906 and 1917 when he joined as the curator he was busy lecturing on Indian art. In 1938 he became the Chairman of the national committee for India’s Freedom. His contributions on Indian Philosophy, religion art and iconography painting and literature are of the greatest importance as were his contribution on music science and Islamic art. He died on September 9, 1947.

 

Foreword

Coomaraswamy’s A New Approach to the Vedas, Luzac and Company, 1933, The Transformation of Nature in Art, Harvard University Press, 1934, and the present volume, which is published under the auspices of the Harvard-Yenching Institute, are based on the following convictions, which have gradually been developing in his mind.

In the first place, Buddhist art in India — and that is practically equivalent to saying art in India begins about the second century before Christ with a well-developed set of symbols in its iconography. It does not seem possible to completely separate Buddhism as religion and as art from the main current of Indian religion and art, or to think that these symbols suddenly developed as a new creation. Therefore Coomaraswamy proceeded to study from a new point of view the symbolism which pervades the whole early Vedic literature of India, trying to discover whether concepts expressed symbolically in the literature of the anionic Vedic period may not have found their first iconographic expression in early Buddhist art.

In the second place, he noted many surprising similarities between passages in the mediaeval Christian theologians and mystics, such as St Thomas, Meister Eckhart, Ruysbroeck, and Bohme, and passages in the Vedic literature — similarities so striking that many sentences from the Christian writers might be taken as almost literal translations of Sanskrit sentences, or vice versa. The conviction developed in him that mystical theology the world over is the same, and that mediaeval Christian theology might be used as a tool to the better understanding of ancient Indian theology. This theory he proceeded to apply even to the Rig Veda, assuming, contrary to the general opinion, no complete break in thought between the Rig Veda and the Brahmanas and Upanishads. In many obscure and so-called “mystical” stanzas of the Rig Veda and Atharva Veda he finds the same concepts vaguely hinted at which are employed in a more developed form in Brahmanism and Buddhism.

The present study of the Tree of Life, the Earth-Lotus the Word- Wheel, the Lotus-Throne, and the Fiery Pillar tries to show that these symbols can be traced back beyond their first representation in Buddhist iconography through the anionic period of the Brahmanical Vedas even into the Rig Vedic Period itself and that they represent a universal Indian symbolism and set of theological concepts.

Objective linguistics is a apparently near the end of its resources in dealing with the many remaining obscurities of Rig Vedic Phraseology. This new metaphysical approach is welcome even though to the matter of fact linguist it may seem that ideas are not being built up on the basis of words but that words are being made to fit ideas.

 

Sample Pages











Of Related Interest :

 

Putting The Ocean in a Bowl - The Origin of the Buddha Image

Evolution of the Buddha Image

The Eight Auspicious Symbols of Buddhism - A Study in Spiritual Evolution

The Stupa - Yoga's Sacred Architecture

Color Symbolism In Buddhist Art

Study in Early BUDDHIST ARCHITECTURE of India

Buddhist Art (In Praise of the Divine)

ABSENCE OF THE BUDDHA IMAGE IN EARLY BUDDHIST ART (Toward its Significance in Comparative Religion)

Collection of Buddhist Sculpture

Elements of Buddhist Iconography

Item Code:
IAB24
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2008
ISBN:
8121502462
Language:
English
Size:
8.5" x 11.0"
Pages:
103 (44 ills.)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 720 gms
Price:
$31.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Elements of Buddhist Iconography

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 15888 times since 3rd Sep, 2015

From the Jacket:

The present work is an analysis of Buddhist symbolism in historical perspective. In author's view Buddhist symbolism, in art and religion, is but a part of the main current of Indian religion and art and has to be studied in that context. Early Indian art is, thus, essentially the continuation of a mainly aniconic "Vedic" style and the compositions are comprehensible only with reference to Vedic notions. The present work studies the fundamental elements of Buddhist symbolism which predominate in the early aniconic art and are never dispensed with in the later imagery, though they are subordinated to the "human" icon. "The present study is divided into two parts: in part I, the tree of life, earth-lotus and world-wheel (and other cognate symbols) have been analyzed; part II deals with the place of the lotus-throne. A study of these reveals that they represent a universal Indian symbolism and set of theological concepts.

 

About the Author

Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy the greatest among the Indian Art historians was born in Colombo on August 22, 1877 After graduating from the University of London he became the director of the Mieralogical Survey of Ceylon. Between 1906 and 1917 when he joined as the curator he was busy lecturing on Indian art. In 1938 he became the Chairman of the national committee for India’s Freedom. His contributions on Indian Philosophy, religion art and iconography painting and literature are of the greatest importance as were his contribution on music science and Islamic art. He died on September 9, 1947.

 

Foreword

Coomaraswamy’s A New Approach to the Vedas, Luzac and Company, 1933, The Transformation of Nature in Art, Harvard University Press, 1934, and the present volume, which is published under the auspices of the Harvard-Yenching Institute, are based on the following convictions, which have gradually been developing in his mind.

In the first place, Buddhist art in India — and that is practically equivalent to saying art in India begins about the second century before Christ with a well-developed set of symbols in its iconography. It does not seem possible to completely separate Buddhism as religion and as art from the main current of Indian religion and art, or to think that these symbols suddenly developed as a new creation. Therefore Coomaraswamy proceeded to study from a new point of view the symbolism which pervades the whole early Vedic literature of India, trying to discover whether concepts expressed symbolically in the literature of the anionic Vedic period may not have found their first iconographic expression in early Buddhist art.

In the second place, he noted many surprising similarities between passages in the mediaeval Christian theologians and mystics, such as St Thomas, Meister Eckhart, Ruysbroeck, and Bohme, and passages in the Vedic literature — similarities so striking that many sentences from the Christian writers might be taken as almost literal translations of Sanskrit sentences, or vice versa. The conviction developed in him that mystical theology the world over is the same, and that mediaeval Christian theology might be used as a tool to the better understanding of ancient Indian theology. This theory he proceeded to apply even to the Rig Veda, assuming, contrary to the general opinion, no complete break in thought between the Rig Veda and the Brahmanas and Upanishads. In many obscure and so-called “mystical” stanzas of the Rig Veda and Atharva Veda he finds the same concepts vaguely hinted at which are employed in a more developed form in Brahmanism and Buddhism.

The present study of the Tree of Life, the Earth-Lotus the Word- Wheel, the Lotus-Throne, and the Fiery Pillar tries to show that these symbols can be traced back beyond their first representation in Buddhist iconography through the anionic period of the Brahmanical Vedas even into the Rig Vedic Period itself and that they represent a universal Indian symbolism and set of theological concepts.

Objective linguistics is a apparently near the end of its resources in dealing with the many remaining obscurities of Rig Vedic Phraseology. This new metaphysical approach is welcome even though to the matter of fact linguist it may seem that ideas are not being built up on the basis of words but that words are being made to fit ideas.

 

Sample Pages











Of Related Interest :

 

Putting The Ocean in a Bowl - The Origin of the Buddha Image

Evolution of the Buddha Image

The Eight Auspicious Symbols of Buddhism - A Study in Spiritual Evolution

The Stupa - Yoga's Sacred Architecture

Color Symbolism In Buddhist Art

Study in Early BUDDHIST ARCHITECTURE of India

Buddhist Art (In Praise of the Divine)

ABSENCE OF THE BUDDHA IMAGE IN EARLY BUDDHIST ART (Toward its Significance in Comparative Religion)

Collection of Buddhist Sculpture

Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Buddhist Tantra and Buddhist Art
by T. N. MISHRA
Hardcover (Edition: 2000)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDD151
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Buddha in Gandhara Art and Other Buddhist Sites
by Shantilal Nagar
Hardcover (Edition: 2010)
Buddhist World Press
Item Code: NAL253
$125.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
ABSENCE OF THE BUDDHA IMAGE IN EARLY BUDDHIST ART (Toward its Significance in Comparative Religion)
Deal 10% Off
by KANOKO TANAKA
Hardcover (Edition: 1998)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDD692
$70.00$63.00
You save: $7.00 (10%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Buddhist Art of Gandhara (The story of the early school: Its birth, growth and decline)
Deal 10% Off
Item Code: IDC853
$50.00$45.00
You save: $5.00 (10%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Art of Ancient India (Buddhist, Hindu, Jain)
Deal 20% Off
Item Code: NAG554
$90.00$72.00
You save: $18.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Studies in Hindu and Buddhist Art
by Ed. By. P.K. Mishra
Hardcover (Edition: 1999)
Abhinav Publications
Item Code: IDE189
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Discourse in Early Buddhist Art: Visual Narratives of India
Item Code: IDE539
$75.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Glimpses of Art, Architecture and Buddhist Literature in Ancient India
by K. Krishna Murthy
Hardcover (Edition: 1987)
Abhinav Publications
Item Code: IDE050
$22.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Buddhist Art of Kausambi
by Aruna Tripathi
Hardcover (Edition: 2003)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDJ927
$125.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Buddhist Art in India and Sri Lanka
Item Code: IDD152
$40.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

I have been buying from Exotic India for years and am always pleased and excited to receive my packages. Thanks for the quality products.
Delia, USA
As ever, brilliant price and service.
Howard, UK.
The best and fastest service worldwide - I am in Australia and I put in a big order of books (14 items) on a Wednesday; it was sent on Friday and arrived at my doorstep early on Monday morning - amazing! All very securely packed in a very strong cardboard box. I have bought several times from Exotic India and the service is always exceptionally good. THANK YOU and NAMASTE!
Charles (Rudra)
I just wanted to say that this is I think my 3rd (big) order from you, and the last two times I received immaculate service, the books arrived well and it has been a very pleasant experience. Just wanted to say thanks for your efficient service.
Shantala, Belgium
Thank you so much EXOTIC INDIA for the wonderfull packaging!! I received my order today and it was gift wrapped with so much love and taste in a beautiful golden gift wrap and everything was neat and beautifully packed. Also my order came very fast... i am impressed! Besides selling fantastic items, you provide an exceptional customer service and i will surely purchase again from you! I am very glad and happy :) Thank you, Salma
Salma, Canada.
Artwork received today. Very pleased both with the product quality and speed of delivery. Many thanks for your help.
Carl, UK.
I wanted to let you know how happy we are with our framed pieces of Shree Durga and Shree Kali. Thank you and thank your framers for us. By the way, this month we offered a Puja and Yagna to the Ardhanarishwara murti we purchased from you last November. The Brahmin priest, Shree Vivek Godbol, who was visiting LA preformed the rites. He really loved our murti and thought it very paka. I am so happy to have found your site , it is very paka and trustworthy. Plus such great packing and quick shipping. Thanks for your service Vipin, it is a pleasure.
Gina, USA
My marble statue of Durga arrived today in perfect condition, it's such a beautiful statue. Thanks again for giving me a discount on it, I'm always very pleased with the items I order from you. You always have the best quality items.
Charles, Tennessee
Jay Shree Krishna Shrimud Bhagavatam Mahapurana in Sanskrat Parayana is very very thankful to you we are so gratefully to your seva
Mrs. Darbar, UK.
Its a very efficient website and questions queries are responded promptly. very reliable website. Thank you.
Kailash, Australia.
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India