Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
Share
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Books > Philosophy > Fundamentals of Visistadvaita Vedanta: A Study based on Vedanta Desika's Tattva-mukta-Kalapa
Displaying 2165 of 2698         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Fundamentals of Visistadvaita Vedanta: A Study based on Vedanta Desika's Tattva-mukta-Kalapa
Fundamentals of Visistadvaita Vedanta: A Study based on Vedanta Desika's Tattva-mukta-Kalapa
Description
From the Jacket:

The doctrine of Visistadvaita, expounded by Ramanuja, was developed into a sound system of philosophy by the most brilliant of his successors, Venkatanatha, 'popularly known as Vedanta Desika.' His chief contribution to the intellectual foundation of the system lay in the composition of the text of Tattva-mukta-kalapa, a treatise of significant philosophical import left for posterity.

In this volume, which is a study of Visistadvaita based on Tattva-mukta-kalapa, the line of arguments advanced by Vedanta Desika is closely followed. The major and important issues related to the philosophy of Visistadvaita are brought within the purview of discussion. The contemporary rival schools represented by Carvakas, Buddhists and Jainas, Nayaya-Vaisesikas, Mimamsakas and the Advaitins, of both orthodox and unorthodox camps, are successfully encountered. In the textual light of Tattva-mukta-kalapa, the notion that Visistadvaita is a theological system is dispelled, and its philosophic core is established beyond doubt.

The author maintains 'the original orthodox style, so characteristic of the ancient Acaryas', in his delineation of topics; yet the exposition remains free from all kinds of scholastic trappings.

The volume is a definitive study of Visistadvaita doctrine, both in their 'philosophical as well as theological aspects'. Its in-depth probe of 'the fundamental epistemological and philosophical issues…common to all schools' both I the East and the West makes its appeal to those interested 'in understanding the basic problems of philosophy'.

About The Author:

S. M. Srinivasa Chari (b. 1919, Mysore) has a brilliant academic record. He is an M. A. in Philosophy of the University of Mysore and recipient of Ph.D. from the University of Madras. He is a finished Sanskrit scholar trained up by eminent traditional teachers. He was a research Scholar at the University of Madras and a Fellow of Institute of Philosophy at Amalner in Maharashtra.

Dr. Chari joined the Ministry of Education, Government of India, after the completion of his university career. He retired in 1976 as Joint Educational Adviser.

Dr. Chari has traveled widely. He has participated in international conferences abroad, and addressed learned assemblies at University Centres on aspects of Indian philosophy and religion. He is author of Advaita and Visistadvaita and Vaisnavism

CONTENTS

Forewordvii
Prefaceix
Scheme of Transliterationxvii
List of Abbreviationxix
INTRODUCTION1
Meaning of the Term Visistadvaita   1;   Development of Visistadvaita as a Ssystem of Philosophy   2;  Vedanta Desika and Visistadvaita   5; Tattva-Mukta-Kalpa as a Philosophical Treatise   7;   Nature and Scope of Tattva-Mukta-Kalpa   9;   Substance of Tattva-Mukta-Kalpa   12;   Central Theme of Tattva-Mukta-Kalpa   15;   Scope of the Present Book   16

Chapter One
FUNDAMENTAL METAPHYSICAL CATEGORIES22
Definition and Classification of Categories   22;   The Concept of Substance and Attribute   26;   Visistadvaita View   26;   Criticism of Buddhist view Denying Substance   28;   Criticism of Advaitin's Theory of Difference as Illusory   32;   Criticism of Bhaskara's Theory of Bhedabheda   35;   Criticism of the Jaina Theory of Anekanta   38;   The Concept of Relation   42;   Nayaa-Vaisesika Theory of Samavaya   42;   Visistadvaita Theory of Aprthak-siddhi  43;   The Concept of Body-Soul Relation   47;   The Concept of Cause and Effect   52;   Ontological Implication of Causality   52;   Criticism of Carvaka View of Causality   54;   Criticism of Advaitin's Theory of Causality   55;   Criticism of Nyaya-Vaisesika Theory of Cause and effect   59;   Criticism of the Sankhya Theory of Cause and Effect   61;   Criticism of the Buddhist Doctrine of Momentariness   63;   Conclusion   72

Chapter Two
PRAMANAS AND THEIR VALIDITY73
Perception   74;   Nature and Content of Pratyaksa   74;   Advaitin's Theory of Nirvikalpaka Pratyaksa   75;   Criticism of Buddhist Theory of Savikalpaka Pratyaka  78;   Criticism of Bhartrhari's Theory of Sabda-dhyasa   80;   The Theory of Supernormal Perception   82;   Inference   84;   Anumana as a valid and an Independent Pramana   84;   Method of Estabishing Logical Concomitance   87;   Type of Syllogism   88;   The Components of syllogism   90;   Logical Fallacies   91;   Rules Governing the Logical Argument   92;   Rules Regulating Philosophic Debate   94;   Verbal Testimony   96;   Sabda as a Valid and Independent Pramana   96;   Authoritativeness of the Veda   99;   Vedas and Agamas of Other Schools   104;   Authoritativeness of Smrtis and Puranas   105;   Authoritativeness of Pancaratra Agama   106;   Other Pramanas   107;   Smrti   107;   Upamana   109;   Arthapatti   111;   Anupalabdhi   111;   Relative validity of Pramanas   113

Chapter Three
LOGICAL IMPORT OF WORDS AND SENTENCES116
Criticism of Mimamsa Theory   117;   Connotation and Denotation of Words   121;   Criticism of Sphotavada   126;   Buddhist Theory of Vakyrtha   128;   Function of Words in Sentence   129;   Import of Samanadhikarana-vakya   131;   Import of Kaksana-vakya   137

Chapter Four
THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE140
Knowledge as n Attribute of Jiva   140;   knowledge as Self-Luminous   142;   Knowledge as Eternal   147;   Knowledge as Substance   150;   The Theory of Transcendental Knowledge   153

Chapter Five
KNOWLEDGE AND EXTERNAL WORLD158
Subject-Object Relation   159;   Theory of Visistadvaita   160;   Criticism of Yogacara Buddhist Theory of Knowledge   161;   Criticism of Sautranttka Buddhist Theory of Knowledge   167;   Criticism of the Theory of Madhyamika Buddhist   169;   Theory of Truth and Error   171;   Criticism of Buddhist Theories of Error   173;   Criticism of Advaitin's Theory of Error   175;   Theory of Satkhyati   176;   Theory of Akhyati   179;   Criticism of the Theory of Anyathakhyati   180;   Self-Validity of Knowledge   183

Chapter Six187
THE DOCTRINE OF JIVA
Jiva as Different form Body and Mind   188;   Jiva as the Subject of Knowledge   191;   Jiva as Self-Lumious   193;   Jiva as Eternal   195;   Jiva as Karta and Bhokta  197;   Theory of Free-Will and Determinism   201;   Plurality of the Individual Selves   203;   Criticism of Ekajivavada   205;   Jiva as Anu   207;   Criticism of Jaina Theory of Jiva   208;   Criticism of Nyaya Theory of Jiva as Vibhu   209;   Jiva and Brahman   212

Chapter Seven216
Proofs for the Existence of God   217;   Criticism of Nyaya Arguments for Existence of God   219;   The Nature of Ultimate Reality   223;   The Theory of Nirguna Brahman   229;   God and His Attributes   232;   Material Causality of Brahman   242;   Criticism of Yadavaprakasa Theory   243;   Criticism of Bhaskara's Theory   245;   Criticism of Vivartavada   245;   Visistadvaita Theory of Brahman as Material Cause of Universe   246

Chapter Eight
BRAHMAN AND UNIVERSE251
Criticism of the Doctrine of Avidya   252;   Criticism of the Theory of Universe as Illusory   260;   Universe as an Integral Part of Brahman 271

Chapter Nine
SADHANA ANDMUKTI277
Eligibility of Jiva for Moksa   277;   Bhakti as the Means to Moksa   280;   Theories of Jnana as the Means to Moksa   287;   Place of Karma in the Spiritual Discipline   295;   Karma and Upasana   300;   Removal of Punya and Papa by Upasana   302;   Path to Moksa   306;   The Nature of Mukti   307;   Criticism of Other Theories of Mukti   310;   Criticism of the Theory of Jivan-Mukti 314

Chapter Ten
PRAKRTI AND ITS EVOLUTES317
Nature and Order of Evolution   317;   Theory of Pancikarana   321;   Criticism of Sankhya and Naiyayika Theories of Evolution   323;   Nature of the Sense Organs   324;   Theory of Space (Akasa)   328;   Nature of Other Elements   331;   The Element of Vayu   331;   The Element of Agni   334;   The Element of Prithivi   335;   The Theory of Time (Kala)   337;   The Doctrine of Nitya-Vibhuti   340

Chapter Eleven
FUNDAMENTAL ATTRIBUTES344
Visistadvaita Theory of Attributes   344;   Attributes of Cosmic Matter   344;   Attributes of the Five Elements   345;   Sakti as an Attribute of Causal Substances   350;   Samyoga as Relation   351;   Nayaya-Vaisesika Theory of Attributes   353;   Material Attribute   354;   Mental Attributes   361;   Ethical Attributes   365;   Other Categories   369;   Nayaya Theory of Karma   369;   Nyaya Theory of Samanya   371;   Visistadvaita Concept of Jati   373;   The Concept of Visesa   377;   The Concept of Abhava   378

Chapter Twleve
GENERAL ESTIMATE AND CONCLUSION

382
Glossary401
Bibliography415
Index417

Fundamentals of Visistadvaita Vedanta: A Study based on Vedanta Desika's Tattva-mukta-Kalapa

Item Code:
IDE326
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2004
Publisher:
Motilal Banarsidass Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
ISBN:
81-208-0266-7
Language:
English
Size:
8.8" X 5.8"
Pages:
442
Other Details:
696 gms
Price:
$35.50   Shipping Free
Notify me when this item is available
Notify me when this item is available
You will be notified when this item is available
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Fundamentals of Visistadvaita Vedanta: A Study based on Vedanta Desika's Tattva-mukta-Kalapa

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 7303 times since 5th Dec, 2010
From the Jacket:

The doctrine of Visistadvaita, expounded by Ramanuja, was developed into a sound system of philosophy by the most brilliant of his successors, Venkatanatha, 'popularly known as Vedanta Desika.' His chief contribution to the intellectual foundation of the system lay in the composition of the text of Tattva-mukta-kalapa, a treatise of significant philosophical import left for posterity.

In this volume, which is a study of Visistadvaita based on Tattva-mukta-kalapa, the line of arguments advanced by Vedanta Desika is closely followed. The major and important issues related to the philosophy of Visistadvaita are brought within the purview of discussion. The contemporary rival schools represented by Carvakas, Buddhists and Jainas, Nayaya-Vaisesikas, Mimamsakas and the Advaitins, of both orthodox and unorthodox camps, are successfully encountered. In the textual light of Tattva-mukta-kalapa, the notion that Visistadvaita is a theological system is dispelled, and its philosophic core is established beyond doubt.

The author maintains 'the original orthodox style, so characteristic of the ancient Acaryas', in his delineation of topics; yet the exposition remains free from all kinds of scholastic trappings.

The volume is a definitive study of Visistadvaita doctrine, both in their 'philosophical as well as theological aspects'. Its in-depth probe of 'the fundamental epistemological and philosophical issues…common to all schools' both I the East and the West makes its appeal to those interested 'in understanding the basic problems of philosophy'.

About The Author:

S. M. Srinivasa Chari (b. 1919, Mysore) has a brilliant academic record. He is an M. A. in Philosophy of the University of Mysore and recipient of Ph.D. from the University of Madras. He is a finished Sanskrit scholar trained up by eminent traditional teachers. He was a research Scholar at the University of Madras and a Fellow of Institute of Philosophy at Amalner in Maharashtra.

Dr. Chari joined the Ministry of Education, Government of India, after the completion of his university career. He retired in 1976 as Joint Educational Adviser.

Dr. Chari has traveled widely. He has participated in international conferences abroad, and addressed learned assemblies at University Centres on aspects of Indian philosophy and religion. He is author of Advaita and Visistadvaita and Vaisnavism

CONTENTS

Forewordvii
Prefaceix
Scheme of Transliterationxvii
List of Abbreviationxix
INTRODUCTION1
Meaning of the Term Visistadvaita   1;   Development of Visistadvaita as a Ssystem of Philosophy   2;  Vedanta Desika and Visistadvaita   5; Tattva-Mukta-Kalpa as a Philosophical Treatise   7;   Nature and Scope of Tattva-Mukta-Kalpa   9;   Substance of Tattva-Mukta-Kalpa   12;   Central Theme of Tattva-Mukta-Kalpa   15;   Scope of the Present Book   16

Chapter One
FUNDAMENTAL METAPHYSICAL CATEGORIES22
Definition and Classification of Categories   22;   The Concept of Substance and Attribute   26;   Visistadvaita View   26;   Criticism of Buddhist view Denying Substance   28;   Criticism of Advaitin's Theory of Difference as Illusory   32;   Criticism of Bhaskara's Theory of Bhedabheda   35;   Criticism of the Jaina Theory of Anekanta   38;   The Concept of Relation   42;   Nayaa-Vaisesika Theory of Samavaya   42;   Visistadvaita Theory of Aprthak-siddhi  43;   The Concept of Body-Soul Relation   47;   The Concept of Cause and Effect   52;   Ontological Implication of Causality   52;   Criticism of Carvaka View of Causality   54;   Criticism of Advaitin's Theory of Causality   55;   Criticism of Nyaya-Vaisesika Theory of Cause and effect   59;   Criticism of the Sankhya Theory of Cause and Effect   61;   Criticism of the Buddhist Doctrine of Momentariness   63;   Conclusion   72

Chapter Two
PRAMANAS AND THEIR VALIDITY73
Perception   74;   Nature and Content of Pratyaksa   74;   Advaitin's Theory of Nirvikalpaka Pratyaksa   75;   Criticism of Buddhist Theory of Savikalpaka Pratyaka  78;   Criticism of Bhartrhari's Theory of Sabda-dhyasa   80;   The Theory of Supernormal Perception   82;   Inference   84;   Anumana as a valid and an Independent Pramana   84;   Method of Estabishing Logical Concomitance   87;   Type of Syllogism   88;   The Components of syllogism   90;   Logical Fallacies   91;   Rules Governing the Logical Argument   92;   Rules Regulating Philosophic Debate   94;   Verbal Testimony   96;   Sabda as a Valid and Independent Pramana   96;   Authoritativeness of the Veda   99;   Vedas and Agamas of Other Schools   104;   Authoritativeness of Smrtis and Puranas   105;   Authoritativeness of Pancaratra Agama   106;   Other Pramanas   107;   Smrti   107;   Upamana   109;   Arthapatti   111;   Anupalabdhi   111;   Relative validity of Pramanas   113

Chapter Three
LOGICAL IMPORT OF WORDS AND SENTENCES116
Criticism of Mimamsa Theory   117;   Connotation and Denotation of Words   121;   Criticism of Sphotavada   126;   Buddhist Theory of Vakyrtha   128;   Function of Words in Sentence   129;   Import of Samanadhikarana-vakya   131;   Import of Kaksana-vakya   137

Chapter Four
THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE140
Knowledge as n Attribute of Jiva   140;   knowledge as Self-Luminous   142;   Knowledge as Eternal   147;   Knowledge as Substance   150;   The Theory of Transcendental Knowledge   153

Chapter Five
KNOWLEDGE AND EXTERNAL WORLD158
Subject-Object Relation   159;   Theory of Visistadvaita   160;   Criticism of Yogacara Buddhist Theory of Knowledge   161;   Criticism of Sautranttka Buddhist Theory of Knowledge   167;   Criticism of the Theory of Madhyamika Buddhist   169;   Theory of Truth and Error   171;   Criticism of Buddhist Theories of Error   173;   Criticism of Advaitin's Theory of Error   175;   Theory of Satkhyati   176;   Theory of Akhyati   179;   Criticism of the Theory of Anyathakhyati   180;   Self-Validity of Knowledge   183

Chapter Six187
THE DOCTRINE OF JIVA
Jiva as Different form Body and Mind   188;   Jiva as the Subject of Knowledge   191;   Jiva as Self-Lumious   193;   Jiva as Eternal   195;   Jiva as Karta and Bhokta  197;   Theory of Free-Will and Determinism   201;   Plurality of the Individual Selves   203;   Criticism of Ekajivavada   205;   Jiva as Anu   207;   Criticism of Jaina Theory of Jiva   208;   Criticism of Nyaya Theory of Jiva as Vibhu   209;   Jiva and Brahman   212

Chapter Seven216
Proofs for the Existence of God   217;   Criticism of Nyaya Arguments for Existence of God   219;   The Nature of Ultimate Reality   223;   The Theory of Nirguna Brahman   229;   God and His Attributes   232;   Material Causality of Brahman   242;   Criticism of Yadavaprakasa Theory   243;   Criticism of Bhaskara's Theory   245;   Criticism of Vivartavada   245;   Visistadvaita Theory of Brahman as Material Cause of Universe   246

Chapter Eight
BRAHMAN AND UNIVERSE251
Criticism of the Doctrine of Avidya   252;   Criticism of the Theory of Universe as Illusory   260;   Universe as an Integral Part of Brahman 271

Chapter Nine
SADHANA ANDMUKTI277
Eligibility of Jiva for Moksa   277;   Bhakti as the Means to Moksa   280;   Theories of Jnana as the Means to Moksa   287;   Place of Karma in the Spiritual Discipline   295;   Karma and Upasana   300;   Removal of Punya and Papa by Upasana   302;   Path to Moksa   306;   The Nature of Mukti   307;   Criticism of Other Theories of Mukti   310;   Criticism of the Theory of Jivan-Mukti 314

Chapter Ten
PRAKRTI AND ITS EVOLUTES317
Nature and Order of Evolution   317;   Theory of Pancikarana   321;   Criticism of Sankhya and Naiyayika Theories of Evolution   323;   Nature of the Sense Organs   324;   Theory of Space (Akasa)   328;   Nature of Other Elements   331;   The Element of Vayu   331;   The Element of Agni   334;   The Element of Prithivi   335;   The Theory of Time (Kala)   337;   The Doctrine of Nitya-Vibhuti   340

Chapter Eleven
FUNDAMENTAL ATTRIBUTES344
Visistadvaita Theory of Attributes   344;   Attributes of Cosmic Matter   344;   Attributes of the Five Elements   345;   Sakti as an Attribute of Causal Substances   350;   Samyoga as Relation   351;   Nayaya-Vaisesika Theory of Attributes   353;   Material Attribute   354;   Mental Attributes   361;   Ethical Attributes   365;   Other Categories   369;   Nayaya Theory of Karma   369;   Nyaya Theory of Samanya   371;   Visistadvaita Concept of Jati   373;   The Concept of Visesa   377;   The Concept of Abhava   378

Chapter Twleve
GENERAL ESTIMATE AND CONCLUSION

382
Glossary401
Bibliography415
Index417

Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Shri Ramanuja - Founder of Visistadvaita
Deal 20% Off
Bronze Statue from Swamimalai
4 inch x 3.3 inch x 2.2 inch
695 gms
Item Code: ZAK10
$295.00$236.00
You save: $59.00 (20%)
Tattvatraya of Lokacarya: A Treatise on Visistadvaita Vedanta (An Old and Rare Book)
by B.M. Awasthi and C.K. Datta
Hardcover (Edition: 1973)
Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAM153
$20.00
The Philosophy Of Visistadvaita
by P. N. Srinivasachari
Hardcover (Edition: 2010)
The Adyar Library and Research Center
Item Code: NAE161
$40.00
Visistadvaita (A Philosophy of Religion)
by K.R. Paramahamsa
Paperback (Edition: 2010)
Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanams, Tirupati
Item Code: NAG150
$20.00
Essentials of Visistadvaita
by Dr. M. A. Alwar
Paperback (Edition: 2010)
Shri Kashi Sesha Sastri Religious Trust, Bangalore
Item Code: NAC378
$27.00
Visistadvaita and Dvaita (A Systematic and Comparative Study of the Two Schools of Vedanta)
by B.N. Hebbar
Hardcover (Edition: 2004)
Bharatiya Granth Niketan
Item Code: NAF511
$40.00
विशिष्टाद्वैतकोश: Visistadvaita Kosha - An Old and Rare Book (Set of Ten Volumes)
Hardcover (Edition: 1983)
Academy of Sanskrit Research, Melkote
Item Code: NZF910
$595.00
The Epistemology of Visistadvaita (A Study Based on the Nyayaparisuddhi of Vedanta Desika)
by Vedavalli Narayanan
Hardcover (Edition: 2008)
Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDK690
$31.00

Testimonials

I’ve received my blue scarf and I am delighted. I am impressed by your professionalism. Thank you so much! I will place another order soon.
Celine, France
Received the consignment in time. Excellent service. I place on record your prompt service and excellent way the product was packed and sent. Kindly accept my appreciation and thanks for all those involved in this work. My prayers t the Almighty to continue the excellent service for the many more years to come. Long live EXOTIC INDIA and its employees
N.KALAICHELVAN, Tamil Nadu
A very thorough and beautiful website and webstore. I have tried for several years to get this Bhagavad Gita Home Study Course from Arshavidya and have been unable. Was so pleased to find it in your store!
George Marshall
A big fan of Exotic India. Have been for years and years. I am always certain to find exactly what I am looking for in your merchandise.
John Dash, western New York, USA
I just got my order and it’s exactly as I hoped it would be!
Nancy, USA.
It is amazing. I am really very very happy with your excellent service. I received the book today in an awesome condition. Thanks again.
Shambhu, New York.
Thank you for making available some many amazing literary works!
Parmanand Jagnandan, USA
I have been very happy with your service in selling Puranas. I have bought several in the past and am happy with the packaging and care you exhibit. Thank you for this Divine Service.
Raj, USA
Thank you very much! My grandpa received the book today and the smile you put on his face was priceless. He has been trying to order this book from other companies for months now. He only recently asked me for help and you have made this transaction so easy. My grandpa is so happy he wants to order two more copies. I am currently in the process of ordering 2 more.
Rinay, Australia
I would just let you know that today I received my order. It was packed so beautifully and what lovely service.
Caroline, Australia
TRUSTe online privacy certification
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2016 © Exotic India