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Jewellery of Scripture
Jewellery of Scripture
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Back of the Book

The History of Buddhism in India and Tibet by the great scholar Boston Richen grub-pa. Also called Burdon Riposte, is held in great esteem by Tibetan and Mongolian learned lamas. It is distinguished from the work of Traumata by the plan of its compositor, ft consists of three parts. The history proper is preceded by systematical review of the whole of Buddhist literature so far as preserved in Tibet and it is followed by a systematical catalogue of works, authors and. translations of all the literature contained in the Kanji and Injure collections, the first Part is of. an overwhelming scientifically value: 1t represents a synthesis of everything which directly or remotely bears the stamp of Buddhism. The whole of its literature sacred and profane is here reviewed as divided in periods, schools and subject matter. No one was better qualified than Bu-stone for he was one of the redactors of the Kanji and Tenure collections in their ft4L form. The present Translation is divided. Hello 2 boo. Book I eoptains3 parts. Part I the merit of studying and preaching the doctrine, part II general review of the literature of Buddhism, Part III The consideration and ftmlfihlment of the ml6, prescribed for study aid teaching. Book II includes. The History of Buddhism, The difference Axons the Buddha’s of the Fortunate Add, The rise of the Buddha in this world. An exhaustive note in the end enhances its utility:

Introduction

To European readers Tibetan historiography is known from Traumata’s History of Buddhism in India, translated simultaneously by two members of the St. Petersburg Academy of Science, W.P. Wassilieff into Russian and A. Schaefer into German.’ But this is not the only work of this kind which the Tibetan literature contains. There are many others. Among them, “The History of Buddhism in India and Tibet”2 by the great scholar Bu-stony Rin-chen-grub-pa (pronounce Burdon Rinchenclub), also called Burdon Repose, is held in great esteem by Tibetan and Mongolian learned lamas. It is distinguished from the work of Traumata by the plan of its composition. It consists of three parts. The history proper is preceded by a systematical review of the whole of Buddhist literature so far as preserved in Tibet, and it is followed by a systematical catalogue of works, authors and translators of all the literature contained in the Kanjur and Tanjur collections. The first part is of an overwhelming scientifically value. It represents a synthesis of everything which directly or remotely bears the stamp of Buddhism, that synthesis which is also the ultimate aim of the European investigation of that religion. The whole of its literature, sacred and profane, is here reviewed as divided in periods, schools and subject-matter. No one was better qualified for such a task than Burdon, for he was one of the redactors of the Kanjur and Tanjur great collections in their final form. As a matter of fact his “History” is but an introduction and a systematical table of contents to the Narthaft editions of the Kanjur and Tanjur.

His work has not failed to attract the attention of European scholarship. Wassilieff quotes it in the first volume of his Buddhism; Sarat Candra Das has translated some excerpts out of it. I myself have published a translation in French, in the Museum 1905 (“Notes de literature bouddhique. La literature Dogcart drapers Houston”), of the part devoted to the literature of the Dogcart school, and, in English, of the part dealing with the Abhidharma literature of the Sarvãstivadins, included in Prof. Takakusu’s work on the Abhidharma literature of the Sarvästivadins. In the years 1927 and 1928 1 has interpreted the work to my pupil E.E. Overfilled making it the subject of our seminary study. He then has made an English translation which was revised by me and is now published, thanks to the kind attention accorded to it by the Heidelberg Society for the Investigation of Buddhist Lore and by its president Professor M. Walleye.

The translation of the first part, now published, was not an easy task, since it consists predominantly of quotations, many of them having the form of mnemonic verse (karikã’s). They had to be identified and their commentaries consulted. With very few exceptions all has been found out by E.E. Overfilled in the Tenure works. The high merit of this self-denying, absorbing and difficult work will, I have no doubt, be fully appreciated by fellow scholars who have a personal experience of that kind of work.

Burdon Riposte was a native of Central Tibet. He lived in the years 1290-1364. He consequently belongs to the old school of Tibetan learning, the school which preceded the now dominant Geauga sect (the yellow-caps) founded by Tonkawa. Besides the History he has written many other works. A full block-print edition of all his works in 15 volumes has recently appeared in Lassa. No copy of it has as yet reached Leningrad. Among his works there is one on logic, TshadTma-rnam-fies-pai-b suds-don=Pramänaviniçcaya-pinçlartha, with his own commentary. A block print containing his biography (rnam-thar) is in my possession. It will be analyzed by E.E. Overfilled in the Introduction also dealing with the sources of Tibetan historiography, which will be attached to the translation of the whole work. The Translation is made from the text of the old block-print edition, a copy of which is found in the Asiatic Museum of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR.

Contents

IntroductionI
Dedicatory verses4
Book I
I. The Merit of Studying and Preaching the Doctrine8
IA. The Merit of Studying and Preaching in general.9
[3b. 1]
I Aa. The Merit of Study. [3 b. 2.]9
lAb. The Merit of Preaching. [5 a. 1.]12
I Aba1 Worship of Buddha by Preaching the
Doctrine. [5 a. 2.] — I Abb Preaching of the
Doctrine as superior to Material Gifts. [5 a.
3.1 — I Abcl Good Memory — a result of
expounding Scripture. [5 a. 5.] — I Abd1
Augmentation of Virtue and Attainment of
Enlightenment by Preaching. [5 b. 1.]
lAc. The Merit of Study and Preaching taken
together. [5 b. 5.]14
I Aca1 Progress of Spiritual Merit through
the Study of the 3 Vehicles. [5 b. 6.] — I
Acb1 Honours of Scholarship. [6 a. 2.] — I
Acc1 Attainment of Enlightenment by the
Study of the Doctrine. [6 b. 1.]
IB. The Special Merit of Studying and Preaching the
Mahayanistic Doctrines. [6 b. 6.]17
IBa. Prevalence over the Merit of the Hinayanist
Saints. [7 a. 1.]17
IBb. Superiority to every other Kind of Merit in
the Path. [7 a. 5.]18
IBc. Certainty of Attaining Omniscience. [7 b. 3.]19
II. General Review of the Literature of Buddhism. [7. b. 6.]20
IIA.The different Meanings of the word “dharma”. [8 a. 1.]20
IIB, Etymology of “dharma” [8 a. 5.]22
IIC.Definition of “dharma” in the sense of “The
Doctrine”. [9 a. 3.]24
lID. The various Aspects of the Doctrine. [10 a. 2.]26
IIDa.The Doctrine from the Standpoint of the
Result. [10 a. 3.]26
IIDb.The Doctrine as the Means of Realising
Nirvana. [10 a. 5.]26
IIDc. The doctrine in its literary form
II Dca1 The Word of Buddha (pravacana). [10 b. 4.]27
IIDca1a2 Its Definition [10 b. 5.]Dca1b2 Etymology of “subha.ita”
(including the 60 Qualities of the voice of a Buddha).
[11a. 1]. II Dca1c2 Varieties of the Word of Buddha [B a. 5.]
II Dca1ca3 Varieties of th Word with
regard to Time. [13a. 5.] - - II Dca1c2b3
Varieties with regard to the Subject Matter. [13a. 6.] . II Dca1c2c3
varieties of Form. The 12 Classes. [13 b. 3.] II
Dca1c2d3 Varieties of the Word from the
standpoint of its being an Antidote
against Sin. - The 3 Codes. [14 b. 3.]
II Dca1c2d3a The 12 Classes of
Scripture as contained in the 3
Codes. [14 b. 5.] II Dca1c2d3b4
Etymology of the word “pi.taka” [15
a. 3.] II Dca1c2d3c4 The Motives
for the Establishment of the 3 Codes
of Scripture. [15 a.4.]
II Dca1cd3ca5 The Codes of
Scripture as purifying from
different forms of Sin. [15 a. 5.]
II Dca1cdcb5 The 3 Codes as
corresponding to the 3 Disciplines.
[15 b. 2.] - - II Dca1c2d3c4c5 The 3
Codes with regard to the Subject
studied. [15b. 4.]
II Dca1cd3d4 Etymology of "Sutra",
“Abhidharma”, and "Vinaya",
[16 a. 2.]
II Dca1c2e3 Varieties of the Word with
regard to the different converts
(Hinayana and Mahayana, Philosophy
and Tantra). [16 b. 5.1 II Dcac1,c2f3
Varieties of the Word of Buddha with
regard to the opportunity, at which it
was pronounced (its principal Cause).
[17 b. 5.]
II Dca1cf3a The Precepts delivered
by the Buddha personally. [17 b. 5.]
II Dca1cf3b4 The Word as the
Result of the Buddha’s Blessings.
[17 b. 5.] — IT Dca1c2f3c4 The
Passages containing the Expression
of the Will of Buddha. [18 a. 2.]
II Dcb1 The Exegetical Treatises (çastra). [18
a. 4.]49
II Dcb1a Definition [18 a. 4.]—II Dcb1b2
Etymology of “çttstra”. [18 a. 5.] — II
Dcb1c2 The Varieties of Exegetical
Treatises. [18 b. 3.]
II Dcb1ca Varieties as regards Quality.
[18 b. 3.] — II Dcb1c2b3 Varieties from
the standpoint of the Aimjl8 b. 6.] —
II Dcb1c,c3 Varieties of Subject-Matter
[19 a. 1.]
II Dcb1c2c3a4 Works, referring to
Empirical Reality (niti-castra and the
5 Sciences). [19a. 2.] — II Dcb1c2b3
Works, referring to Absolute Reality.
[21 a. 5.1—IT Dcb1c2c3c4 Works,
showing the Way to Salvation and
Omniscience. [21 a. 6.]
II Dcb1c2d3 Varieties with regard to the
Interpretation of Scripture. [21 b. 1]
(1) Treatises, interpretating Early
Scripture. (Hinayana). The Works on
Vinaya and Abhidharma. [21 b. 2.]—
(2) Treatises on Madhyamika and
Prajñaparamita. [22 a. 3.]
(3) Treatises, interpreting Scripture
of the latest period. The Yogacara
literature. [23 a. 3.]
II Dcb1c2e3 The various classes of
Exegetical Treatises. [24 b. 5.]
The Consideration and Fulfilment of the Rules,
prescribed for Study and Teaching. [25 a. 6.]69
lIlA. Character of the Doctrine to be taught. [25 b. 1.]70
IIB. Character of the Methods of Teaching. [26 b. 6.]73
IIBa. Definition of the Teacher. [26 b. 6.]74
III Baa1 The High Wisdom of the Teacher. [27b. 3.]76
IIIBaa1a2 The Teacher’s Knowledge of
the Subject to be taught. [27 b. 4.]
III Baa1b2 The Teacher’s Skill in the
Means of expressing himself. [27 b. 5.]
III Baac His Knowledge as to His
own behaviour and as to the Guidance
of his Pupils. [29 a. 2.]
III Bab1 The Teacher’s Great Commiseration. [29 a.6.]81
III Bac1 Correct Methods. [29 b. 4]82
IIIIBb. The Means of Teaching. [30 a. 2.]83
IIIBc. The Character of Teaching. [31 a. 5.]87
IIIBca1 The Character of Teaching with
regard to the students. [31 a. 5.]87
IIIBcb1 The same, with regard to the Aim. [31b. 4.]88
IIIBcc1 a2 The manner of Teaching. [31 b. 4.]88
III Bcc1a2 Preparations. [31 b. 4.]—III
Bcc1b2 The Teaching itself. [32 b. 5.]—Ill
Bcc1c., The Conclusion of Study. [33 a.
IIIC. Character of the Methods of Study. [33 a. 3.]91
IIICa. Character of the Student. [33 a. 3.].92
IIICaa1 The Student of acute faculties. [33
a. 3.]92
IIICaa1a, His Defects. [33 a. 4.]
IIICaa1a2a3 13 Defects according to
Vyakhyayukti [33 a. 4.]—III Caa1a2b3
6 Defects. [33 b. 3.] —IllCaa,a,ç 3
Defects [34 a. 1] --lIICaa1b2 Definition of the Stuck
acute faculties [34 a. 6.]
IIICaa1b2a3 The
Intelligence. [34 b. 1.]--IIICaa2b3
Zeal and Desire to study. [34 b. 4.]
III Caa1bc3 Devotion and Absence of Arrogance. [34 b. 5.]
IIICab1 The Hearer of mediocre Faculties. [34 b. 6.]97
IIICac1 The Hearer of feeble Faculties. [35 a. 3.]97
IlICb. The Means of Study. [35 a. 6.]98
111Cc. The Manner of Studying. [36 a. 1.]99
IIICca Preparations. [36 a. 1.]99
IIICcb1 The Study by itself. [36 b. 3.]101
IIICcc1 Conclusion of the Study. [36 b. 4.]102
IIID. The Instructions for realising the Aim of the Doctrine. [36 b. 5.].102
Book II
IV. The History of Buddhism. [39 a. 2]
IVA. The Rise of Buddhism in Indien. [39 a. 2.]108
IVAa. The different Aeons. [39 a. 4]108
IVAb. The Buddhas of the Fortunate Aeon. [39 a. 6]108
IVAba1 The Version of the Karunã109
purclarika. (1005 Buddhas) [41 b. .] —
IVAba1 The Version of the Tathagata
acintya-guhya-nirdeca. (1000 Buddhas) [41 b. 3.]
IVAc. The Rise of the Buddha in this World. [44 b. 5.]120
IVAca1d2 The first Creative Effort (citta
utpi da), according to the Hinayanistic
Tradition. [45 b. 2.] — IVAcb1a2 The
Buddha’s Accumulation of Merit,
according to Hinayana. [46 a. 2.] — IV
Acc1a2 The Hinayanistic Tradition,
concerning the Buddha’s Attainment of
Enlightenment. [47 a. 1.] — IVAca1b2
The Creative Effort according to the
Mahayanistic Tradition. [47 a. 2.]
IVAca1b1a3 Its Essential Character. [47
a. 3.] — IVAca1b2b3 Its Causes. [47 a.
6.] — IVAca1b2c3 Its Result. [47 b. 2.]
IVAca1b2d3 Its Varieties from
different points of view. [47 b. 4.1 —
IVAca1b2e3 The Mahäyãnistic Tradition,
concerning the Buddha’s first Creative
Effort. [48 b. 3.]
IV Acb1b2 The Accumulation of Merit,
according to Mahayna. [49 a. 3.]
IV Acb1b2c3 Its Character. [49 a. 3.]130
IVAcb1b2a3a4 Its Definition [49. a. 4.]
— IVAcb1b2a3b4 Connection with the
6 Transcendental Virtues. [49 a. 5.]
— IVAcb1b2a3c4 The Etymology of
“sarhbhara”. [49 a. 6.1 IVAcb1b,a3d4
The Functions of the Accumulation
[49 b. 1.] — IVAcb1b2a3e4 Its Modes.
[49 b. I] IVAcb1b2a3f4 Its Results. [49
b. 3.] — IVAcb1b2a3g4 Its Sphere of
Activity. [49 b. 5.] — IVAcb1b2a3h4
The Accumulation from different points of view. [49 b. 5.]
IVAcb1b2b3 The Time of Accumulation
(the 3 asathkhya). [3 a. 3.1 — IVAcb1b2c3
The Mahayãnistic Traditions, concer
ning the Buddha’s Accumulation of
Merit. The Account of the Bodhisattvapitaka.
[55 b. 2.]
IVAcc1b2 The Attainment of Buddha
hood-Mahayãnistic Version [56 b. 4.]152
IVAcc1b2a3 The Essence of Buddha- hood. [56 b. 5.]
IVAcc1b2aa4 The Essential Character
of the 3 Bodies. [57 a. 2.] Bodies. [57 a. 2.] IV Acc1b2a3b4
The Etymology of “dharmakaya”
“samhbhogakãya “, and nirinaiiakãya”
[57 a. 3.] IVAcc1b2a3c4 The
3 Bodies as corresponding to their
Aim. [57 b. 3.] - - IV Acc1b2a3d4 The
3 Bodies as the Objects of Cognition
of the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas.
[57 b. 4.] - - IVAcc1b2a3e4 The various
Aspects of the 3 Bodies. [58 a. 4.]
IVAcc1b2b3 The Acts of the Buddha. [59 a. 3.]

Jewellery of Scripture

Item Code:
NAD313
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2000
Publisher:
Paljor Publications
ISBN:
8186230149
Size:
9.0 inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
231
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 434 gms
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Back of the Book

The History of Buddhism in India and Tibet by the great scholar Boston Richen grub-pa. Also called Burdon Riposte, is held in great esteem by Tibetan and Mongolian learned lamas. It is distinguished from the work of Traumata by the plan of its compositor, ft consists of three parts. The history proper is preceded by systematical review of the whole of Buddhist literature so far as preserved in Tibet and it is followed by a systematical catalogue of works, authors and. translations of all the literature contained in the Kanji and Injure collections, the first Part is of. an overwhelming scientifically value: 1t represents a synthesis of everything which directly or remotely bears the stamp of Buddhism. The whole of its literature sacred and profane is here reviewed as divided in periods, schools and subject matter. No one was better qualified than Bu-stone for he was one of the redactors of the Kanji and Tenure collections in their ft4L form. The present Translation is divided. Hello 2 boo. Book I eoptains3 parts. Part I the merit of studying and preaching the doctrine, part II general review of the literature of Buddhism, Part III The consideration and ftmlfihlment of the ml6, prescribed for study aid teaching. Book II includes. The History of Buddhism, The difference Axons the Buddha’s of the Fortunate Add, The rise of the Buddha in this world. An exhaustive note in the end enhances its utility:

Introduction

To European readers Tibetan historiography is known from Traumata’s History of Buddhism in India, translated simultaneously by two members of the St. Petersburg Academy of Science, W.P. Wassilieff into Russian and A. Schaefer into German.’ But this is not the only work of this kind which the Tibetan literature contains. There are many others. Among them, “The History of Buddhism in India and Tibet”2 by the great scholar Bu-stony Rin-chen-grub-pa (pronounce Burdon Rinchenclub), also called Burdon Repose, is held in great esteem by Tibetan and Mongolian learned lamas. It is distinguished from the work of Traumata by the plan of its composition. It consists of three parts. The history proper is preceded by a systematical review of the whole of Buddhist literature so far as preserved in Tibet, and it is followed by a systematical catalogue of works, authors and translators of all the literature contained in the Kanjur and Tanjur collections. The first part is of an overwhelming scientifically value. It represents a synthesis of everything which directly or remotely bears the stamp of Buddhism, that synthesis which is also the ultimate aim of the European investigation of that religion. The whole of its literature, sacred and profane, is here reviewed as divided in periods, schools and subject-matter. No one was better qualified for such a task than Burdon, for he was one of the redactors of the Kanjur and Tanjur great collections in their final form. As a matter of fact his “History” is but an introduction and a systematical table of contents to the Narthaft editions of the Kanjur and Tanjur.

His work has not failed to attract the attention of European scholarship. Wassilieff quotes it in the first volume of his Buddhism; Sarat Candra Das has translated some excerpts out of it. I myself have published a translation in French, in the Museum 1905 (“Notes de literature bouddhique. La literature Dogcart drapers Houston”), of the part devoted to the literature of the Dogcart school, and, in English, of the part dealing with the Abhidharma literature of the Sarvãstivadins, included in Prof. Takakusu’s work on the Abhidharma literature of the Sarvästivadins. In the years 1927 and 1928 1 has interpreted the work to my pupil E.E. Overfilled making it the subject of our seminary study. He then has made an English translation which was revised by me and is now published, thanks to the kind attention accorded to it by the Heidelberg Society for the Investigation of Buddhist Lore and by its president Professor M. Walleye.

The translation of the first part, now published, was not an easy task, since it consists predominantly of quotations, many of them having the form of mnemonic verse (karikã’s). They had to be identified and their commentaries consulted. With very few exceptions all has been found out by E.E. Overfilled in the Tenure works. The high merit of this self-denying, absorbing and difficult work will, I have no doubt, be fully appreciated by fellow scholars who have a personal experience of that kind of work.

Burdon Riposte was a native of Central Tibet. He lived in the years 1290-1364. He consequently belongs to the old school of Tibetan learning, the school which preceded the now dominant Geauga sect (the yellow-caps) founded by Tonkawa. Besides the History he has written many other works. A full block-print edition of all his works in 15 volumes has recently appeared in Lassa. No copy of it has as yet reached Leningrad. Among his works there is one on logic, TshadTma-rnam-fies-pai-b suds-don=Pramänaviniçcaya-pinçlartha, with his own commentary. A block print containing his biography (rnam-thar) is in my possession. It will be analyzed by E.E. Overfilled in the Introduction also dealing with the sources of Tibetan historiography, which will be attached to the translation of the whole work. The Translation is made from the text of the old block-print edition, a copy of which is found in the Asiatic Museum of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR.

Contents

IntroductionI
Dedicatory verses4
Book I
I. The Merit of Studying and Preaching the Doctrine8
IA. The Merit of Studying and Preaching in general.9
[3b. 1]
I Aa. The Merit of Study. [3 b. 2.]9
lAb. The Merit of Preaching. [5 a. 1.]12
I Aba1 Worship of Buddha by Preaching the
Doctrine. [5 a. 2.] — I Abb Preaching of the
Doctrine as superior to Material Gifts. [5 a.
3.1 — I Abcl Good Memory — a result of
expounding Scripture. [5 a. 5.] — I Abd1
Augmentation of Virtue and Attainment of
Enlightenment by Preaching. [5 b. 1.]
lAc. The Merit of Study and Preaching taken
together. [5 b. 5.]14
I Aca1 Progress of Spiritual Merit through
the Study of the 3 Vehicles. [5 b. 6.] — I
Acb1 Honours of Scholarship. [6 a. 2.] — I
Acc1 Attainment of Enlightenment by the
Study of the Doctrine. [6 b. 1.]
IB. The Special Merit of Studying and Preaching the
Mahayanistic Doctrines. [6 b. 6.]17
IBa. Prevalence over the Merit of the Hinayanist
Saints. [7 a. 1.]17
IBb. Superiority to every other Kind of Merit in
the Path. [7 a. 5.]18
IBc. Certainty of Attaining Omniscience. [7 b. 3.]19
II. General Review of the Literature of Buddhism. [7. b. 6.]20
IIA.The different Meanings of the word “dharma”. [8 a. 1.]20
IIB, Etymology of “dharma” [8 a. 5.]22
IIC.Definition of “dharma” in the sense of “The
Doctrine”. [9 a. 3.]24
lID. The various Aspects of the Doctrine. [10 a. 2.]26
IIDa.The Doctrine from the Standpoint of the
Result. [10 a. 3.]26
IIDb.The Doctrine as the Means of Realising
Nirvana. [10 a. 5.]26
IIDc. The doctrine in its literary form
II Dca1 The Word of Buddha (pravacana). [10 b. 4.]27
IIDca1a2 Its Definition [10 b. 5.]Dca1b2 Etymology of “subha.ita”
(including the 60 Qualities of the voice of a Buddha).
[11a. 1]. II Dca1c2 Varieties of the Word of Buddha [B a. 5.]
II Dca1ca3 Varieties of th Word with
regard to Time. [13a. 5.] - - II Dca1c2b3
Varieties with regard to the Subject Matter. [13a. 6.] . II Dca1c2c3
varieties of Form. The 12 Classes. [13 b. 3.] II
Dca1c2d3 Varieties of the Word from the
standpoint of its being an Antidote
against Sin. - The 3 Codes. [14 b. 3.]
II Dca1c2d3a The 12 Classes of
Scripture as contained in the 3
Codes. [14 b. 5.] II Dca1c2d3b4
Etymology of the word “pi.taka” [15
a. 3.] II Dca1c2d3c4 The Motives
for the Establishment of the 3 Codes
of Scripture. [15 a.4.]
II Dca1cd3ca5 The Codes of
Scripture as purifying from
different forms of Sin. [15 a. 5.]
II Dca1cdcb5 The 3 Codes as
corresponding to the 3 Disciplines.
[15 b. 2.] - - II Dca1c2d3c4c5 The 3
Codes with regard to the Subject
studied. [15b. 4.]
II Dca1cd3d4 Etymology of "Sutra",
“Abhidharma”, and "Vinaya",
[16 a. 2.]
II Dca1c2e3 Varieties of the Word with
regard to the different converts
(Hinayana and Mahayana, Philosophy
and Tantra). [16 b. 5.1 II Dcac1,c2f3
Varieties of the Word of Buddha with
regard to the opportunity, at which it
was pronounced (its principal Cause).
[17 b. 5.]
II Dca1cf3a The Precepts delivered
by the Buddha personally. [17 b. 5.]
II Dca1cf3b4 The Word as the
Result of the Buddha’s Blessings.
[17 b. 5.] — IT Dca1c2f3c4 The
Passages containing the Expression
of the Will of Buddha. [18 a. 2.]
II Dcb1 The Exegetical Treatises (çastra). [18
a. 4.]49
II Dcb1a Definition [18 a. 4.]—II Dcb1b2
Etymology of “çttstra”. [18 a. 5.] — II
Dcb1c2 The Varieties of Exegetical
Treatises. [18 b. 3.]
II Dcb1ca Varieties as regards Quality.
[18 b. 3.] — II Dcb1c2b3 Varieties from
the standpoint of the Aimjl8 b. 6.] —
II Dcb1c,c3 Varieties of Subject-Matter
[19 a. 1.]
II Dcb1c2c3a4 Works, referring to
Empirical Reality (niti-castra and the
5 Sciences). [19a. 2.] — II Dcb1c2b3
Works, referring to Absolute Reality.
[21 a. 5.1—IT Dcb1c2c3c4 Works,
showing the Way to Salvation and
Omniscience. [21 a. 6.]
II Dcb1c2d3 Varieties with regard to the
Interpretation of Scripture. [21 b. 1]
(1) Treatises, interpretating Early
Scripture. (Hinayana). The Works on
Vinaya and Abhidharma. [21 b. 2.]—
(2) Treatises on Madhyamika and
Prajñaparamita. [22 a. 3.]
(3) Treatises, interpreting Scripture
of the latest period. The Yogacara
literature. [23 a. 3.]
II Dcb1c2e3 The various classes of
Exegetical Treatises. [24 b. 5.]
The Consideration and Fulfilment of the Rules,
prescribed for Study and Teaching. [25 a. 6.]69
lIlA. Character of the Doctrine to be taught. [25 b. 1.]70
IIB. Character of the Methods of Teaching. [26 b. 6.]73
IIBa. Definition of the Teacher. [26 b. 6.]74
III Baa1 The High Wisdom of the Teacher. [27b. 3.]76
IIIBaa1a2 The Teacher’s Knowledge of
the Subject to be taught. [27 b. 4.]
III Baa1b2 The Teacher’s Skill in the
Means of expressing himself. [27 b. 5.]
III Baac His Knowledge as to His
own behaviour and as to the Guidance
of his Pupils. [29 a. 2.]
III Bab1 The Teacher’s Great Commiseration. [29 a.6.]81
III Bac1 Correct Methods. [29 b. 4]82
IIIIBb. The Means of Teaching. [30 a. 2.]83
IIIBc. The Character of Teaching. [31 a. 5.]87
IIIBca1 The Character of Teaching with
regard to the students. [31 a. 5.]87
IIIBcb1 The same, with regard to the Aim. [31b. 4.]88
IIIBcc1 a2 The manner of Teaching. [31 b. 4.]88
III Bcc1a2 Preparations. [31 b. 4.]—III
Bcc1b2 The Teaching itself. [32 b. 5.]—Ill
Bcc1c., The Conclusion of Study. [33 a.
IIIC. Character of the Methods of Study. [33 a. 3.]91
IIICa. Character of the Student. [33 a. 3.].92
IIICaa1 The Student of acute faculties. [33
a. 3.]92
IIICaa1a, His Defects. [33 a. 4.]
IIICaa1a2a3 13 Defects according to
Vyakhyayukti [33 a. 4.]—III Caa1a2b3
6 Defects. [33 b. 3.] —IllCaa,a,ç 3
Defects [34 a. 1] --lIICaa1b2 Definition of the Stuck
acute faculties [34 a. 6.]
IIICaa1b2a3 The
Intelligence. [34 b. 1.]--IIICaa2b3
Zeal and Desire to study. [34 b. 4.]
III Caa1bc3 Devotion and Absence of Arrogance. [34 b. 5.]
IIICab1 The Hearer of mediocre Faculties. [34 b. 6.]97
IIICac1 The Hearer of feeble Faculties. [35 a. 3.]97
IlICb. The Means of Study. [35 a. 6.]98
111Cc. The Manner of Studying. [36 a. 1.]99
IIICca Preparations. [36 a. 1.]99
IIICcb1 The Study by itself. [36 b. 3.]101
IIICcc1 Conclusion of the Study. [36 b. 4.]102
IIID. The Instructions for realising the Aim of the Doctrine. [36 b. 5.].102
Book II
IV. The History of Buddhism. [39 a. 2]
IVA. The Rise of Buddhism in Indien. [39 a. 2.]108
IVAa. The different Aeons. [39 a. 4]108
IVAb. The Buddhas of the Fortunate Aeon. [39 a. 6]108
IVAba1 The Version of the Karunã109
purclarika. (1005 Buddhas) [41 b. .] —
IVAba1 The Version of the Tathagata
acintya-guhya-nirdeca. (1000 Buddhas) [41 b. 3.]
IVAc. The Rise of the Buddha in this World. [44 b. 5.]120
IVAca1d2 The first Creative Effort (citta
utpi da), according to the Hinayanistic
Tradition. [45 b. 2.] — IVAcb1a2 The
Buddha’s Accumulation of Merit,
according to Hinayana. [46 a. 2.] — IV
Acc1a2 The Hinayanistic Tradition,
concerning the Buddha’s Attainment of
Enlightenment. [47 a. 1.] — IVAca1b2
The Creative Effort according to the
Mahayanistic Tradition. [47 a. 2.]
IVAca1b1a3 Its Essential Character. [47
a. 3.] — IVAca1b2b3 Its Causes. [47 a.
6.] — IVAca1b2c3 Its Result. [47 b. 2.]
IVAca1b2d3 Its Varieties from
different points of view. [47 b. 4.1 —
IVAca1b2e3 The Mahäyãnistic Tradition,
concerning the Buddha’s first Creative
Effort. [48 b. 3.]
IV Acb1b2 The Accumulation of Merit,
according to Mahayna. [49 a. 3.]
IV Acb1b2c3 Its Character. [49 a. 3.]130
IVAcb1b2a3a4 Its Definition [49. a. 4.]
— IVAcb1b2a3b4 Connection with the
6 Transcendental Virtues. [49 a. 5.]
— IVAcb1b2a3c4 The Etymology of
“sarhbhara”. [49 a. 6.1 IVAcb1b,a3d4
The Functions of the Accumulation
[49 b. 1.] — IVAcb1b2a3e4 Its Modes.
[49 b. I] IVAcb1b2a3f4 Its Results. [49
b. 3.] — IVAcb1b2a3g4 Its Sphere of
Activity. [49 b. 5.] — IVAcb1b2a3h4
The Accumulation from different points of view. [49 b. 5.]
IVAcb1b2b3 The Time of Accumulation
(the 3 asathkhya). [3 a. 3.1 — IVAcb1b2c3
The Mahayãnistic Traditions, concer
ning the Buddha’s Accumulation of
Merit. The Account of the Bodhisattvapitaka.
[55 b. 2.]
IVAcc1b2 The Attainment of Buddha
hood-Mahayãnistic Version [56 b. 4.]152
IVAcc1b2a3 The Essence of Buddha- hood. [56 b. 5.]
IVAcc1b2aa4 The Essential Character
of the 3 Bodies. [57 a. 2.] Bodies. [57 a. 2.] IV Acc1b2a3b4
The Etymology of “dharmakaya”
“samhbhogakãya “, and nirinaiiakãya”
[57 a. 3.] IVAcc1b2a3c4 The
3 Bodies as corresponding to their
Aim. [57 b. 3.] - - IV Acc1b2a3d4 The
3 Bodies as the Objects of Cognition
of the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas.
[57 b. 4.] - - IVAcc1b2a3e4 The various
Aspects of the 3 Bodies. [58 a. 4.]
IVAcc1b2b3 The Acts of the Buddha. [59 a. 3.]
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