Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > History > The Kanyakubja Gauda Struggle – From the 6th to the 12th Century A.D.
Displaying 332 of 4966         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
The Kanyakubja Gauda Struggle – From the 6th to the 12th Century A.D.
The Kanyakubja Gauda Struggle – From the 6th to the 12th Century A.D.
Description
Foreword

The present volume is the reprint of the book by Professor D.C. Sircar published by the Asiatic Society in 1985 and contained the text of Dr. Biman Behari Majumdar Memorial Lecture delivered by Professor Sircar in 1982.

In the Introduction of his works Professor Sircar succinctly reminds us of an old saying to the effect that my enemy’s enemy is my friend and draws our attention “to a theory of the ancient Indian politicians and its bearing on the various states rising out of the ruins of the Gupta empire.” He further writes ‘The history of the Gauda Kanyakubja struggle is of considerable importance since certain wrong theories have been propounded by historians without having a clear idea about it. One such belief is that the three great powers, viz, the Palas. Gurjara Pratiharas and Ratrakutas, were struggling for the supremacy of North India or for the occupation of Kanauj; but we have tried here to show that neither did the above powers fight with a singular purpose nor had Kanauj acquired a halo of imperialism and was coveted by adventurers as a result thereof before the middle of the ninth century A. D. While Pratihara-Rastrakut struggle began far away from Kanauj. it became one of the greatest cities of India only under the two centuries of Gurjara Pratihara rule. We have also tried to show how the great extent of the Ayudha kingdom has so far remained unrealised by our historians.”

I hope the reprint would be useful to the scholars and students of the field.

 

Foreword
To the First Edition

Asiatic Society feels extremely happy to bring out this learned monograph of Professor D. C. Sircar. Professor Sircar, one of the foremost Indologists in the world, delivered the Biman Behari Majumdar Lecture of 1982. The present volume is an outcome of that series of lectures.

The subject of the monograph is of immense historical importance and interest. The complexities of the Tripartite- Struggle have been a subject of intensive historical research for many years. Eminent historians have written on this topic. Yet, many problems have remained unsolved. Vital data have been missing. Professor Sircar has exhaustively discussed with his usual thoroughness and analytical mind the different aspects of the long drawn struggle for political hegemony In Northern India. The result has been most rewarding for all researchers and students of Indian history of this period. So far, scholars had primarily concentrated on the tussle among the Palas, Pratiharas and the Rastrakutas. By including and throwing new light on such aspects as the importance of the Ayudhas. The problem of the Harsa Era, and the relations among the Gahadavalas, the Palas and the Senas, Professor Sircar has added a new dimension to the study of the subject.

One of the major purposes of the Asiatic Society is to publish works of exacting academic standard. We are grateful to Professor Sircar for giving us an opportunity of publishing such a monograph. We are also grateful to him for undertaking the responsibility of supervising the printing-work of the book himself. But unfortunately his repeated illness and sad and sudden demise on January 10, 1985, did not allow him to see it entirely through the press. A member of our Publication Committee Dr. Samaresh Bandyopadhyay has supervised the printing work of the remaining par to the book. Our sincere thanks are due to Dr. Bandyopadhyay.

Professor D.C. Sircar’s monograph. I am sure, will be widely appreciated by scholars in the field and by his peers.

 

Introduction

While publishing the results of my study of the Dubi plates of king Bhaskaravarman (c. 600-50 A.D.) of Kamarupa with particular reference to the light thrown by the Inscription on the struggle between Gauda and Kamarupa in the sixth and seventh centuries A. D.. I drew attention, more than thirty years ago, to a theory of the ancient Indian politicians and Its bearing on the various states rising out of the ruins of the Gupta empire. It was believed that a king (say A) has his natural enemy in the neighbouring ruler (say B) while the ruler (say C) of the territory beyond that of the enemy king (i.e.. B) was a natural enemy of his Immediate neighbour but a natural friend of the distant neighbour (i.e., A) ; and so on. On the fall of the Gupta empire, about the Gupta year 231(550- 51 A. D.) according to a Jam tradition, their Maukhari feudatories, who became independent at Kanauj (ancient Kanyakubja, Kanyakubja. Kanyakubja, etc.), were enemies of their eastern neighbours, the Gaudas of Bengal. as well as of their south-western neighbours, the Later Guptas of Malaya (i.e. East Malwa). The Gaudas, on the other hand, were not only the enemies of their western neighbours, the Maukharis, but also of their north-eastern neighbours, the Bhauma-Lvarakas of Kamarupa (Assam), and at the same time, they were friends of the Later Gupta enemies of the Maukharis. It seems that the Maukharis and Bhauma-Narakas were friends of each other because they were both enemies of the Gaudas. The Later Guptas were originally friends of the Pusyabhutis of Thanesar; but this relationship was disturbed about the beginning of the seventh century A.D... So that the Pusyabhutis allied themselves with the Maukharis. In this case, a so-called natural enemy’ became a friend on the change of circumstances.

While the Gaudas were succeeded In Bengal and Bihar by the Palas and Senas (eighth to thirteenth century), the kingdom of Kanyakubja or Kanauj (Kanol) passed from the Maukharis first to the Pusyabhuti king Hara (seventh century). next to the Maurya house of Yasovarman (eighth century) and then to the Ayudhas (eighth-ninth century). Gurjara-Pratiharas (ninth to eleventh century) and Gahadavalas (eleventh-twelfth century). But the Kanyakubja-Gauda struggle continued throughout the centuries. The latest event associated with the struggle is the Sena claim to have raised pillars of victory at Varanasi and Prayaga in the dominions of the Gahadavalas as found in the records of I.aksmanasena’s successors who ruled in the eastern areas of Bengal in the thirteenth century A. D. However, the Sena-Gahajavala struggle must have ended sometime before the Turkish Musalman occupation of the western part of Laksmanasena’s empire, the date of the Muslim conquest of Gauda being known from the gold Tanka issued by Ikhtiyaruddin Muhammad bin Bakhtiyar Khalji in the name of Muizuddin Muhammad bin Sam to have been the 19th Ramazan in the Hijri year 601 which corresponds to the 10th May. 1205 A.D. As a matter of fact, the Gahadavalas had been subdued by the Turkish Musalmans more than a decade earlier, so that the struggle could not have continued beyond the twelfth century A.D. However, strained relationship between Western Uttar Pradesh region and Bengal has been traced even in the medieval and modem times as well.

The history of the Gauda-Kanyakubja struggle is of considerable importance since certain wrong theories have been propounded by historians without having a clear idea about it. One such belief is that the three great powers. viz., the Palas. Gurjara-Pratiharas and Rastrakutas, were struggling for the supremacy of North India or for the occupation of Kanauj but we have tried here to show that neither did the above powers fight with a singular purpose nor had Kanol acquired a halo of imperialism and was coveted by adventurers as a result thereof before the middle of the ninth century A. D. While the Pratihàra-Rã4rakUta struggle began far away from Kanauj, It became one of the greatest cities of India only under the two centuries of Gurjara-Pratihara rule. We have also bled to show how the great extent of the Ayudha kingdom has so far remained unrealised by our historians. When sometime ago I was invited by the General Secretary of the Asiatic Society. Calcutta. to deliver the Dr. B.B. Majumdar Memorial Lectures for the year 1982. 1 readily agreed to do so because the late Dr. Majumdar was not only a reputed student of history and political science. but also a valued and respected friend of mine, and it was impossible for me to ignore the opportunity offered to me to pay homage to the memory of my late lamented friend.

In April, 1978, 1 delivered some lectures at the Department of Ancient History, Culture and Archaeology of the University of Allahabad as a Visiting Professor there. A few of the topics discussed in the present series were touched in one or two of the lectures delivered on that occasion.

 

Contents

 

  Introduction xi
Chapter I The Country of Pancala and the city of Kanyakubja 1
Chapter II The Theory of Tripartite Struggle and the Importance of the Ayudhas 8
Chapter III The Gauda-Kanyakubja Struggle from the sixth to the Eighth Century A.D. 17
  Appendix I – The Problem of the Harsa Era 22
  1. Controversy about the Era  
  2. Spread of the Era and the Question of its Use in Gauda  
Chapter IV The Gurjara-Pratitharas and the Palas 43
Chapter V The Gahadavalas and the Palas and senas 48
  Appendix II – The Gurjara-Pratiharas and the Rastrakutas 52
  Postscript 59
  Index 63

Sample Pages





The Kanyakubja Gauda Struggle – From the 6th to the 12th Century A.D.

Item Code:
NAC518
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2011
Publisher:
ISBN:
9788192061580
Size:
8.8 Inch X 5.8 Inch
Pages:
78
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 210 gms
Price:
$20.00
Discounted:
$16.00   Shipping Free
You Save:
$4.00 (20%)
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
The Kanyakubja Gauda Struggle – From the 6th to the 12th Century A.D.

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 3861 times since 29th Apr, 2017
Foreword

The present volume is the reprint of the book by Professor D.C. Sircar published by the Asiatic Society in 1985 and contained the text of Dr. Biman Behari Majumdar Memorial Lecture delivered by Professor Sircar in 1982.

In the Introduction of his works Professor Sircar succinctly reminds us of an old saying to the effect that my enemy’s enemy is my friend and draws our attention “to a theory of the ancient Indian politicians and its bearing on the various states rising out of the ruins of the Gupta empire.” He further writes ‘The history of the Gauda Kanyakubja struggle is of considerable importance since certain wrong theories have been propounded by historians without having a clear idea about it. One such belief is that the three great powers, viz, the Palas. Gurjara Pratiharas and Ratrakutas, were struggling for the supremacy of North India or for the occupation of Kanauj; but we have tried here to show that neither did the above powers fight with a singular purpose nor had Kanauj acquired a halo of imperialism and was coveted by adventurers as a result thereof before the middle of the ninth century A. D. While Pratihara-Rastrakut struggle began far away from Kanauj. it became one of the greatest cities of India only under the two centuries of Gurjara Pratihara rule. We have also tried to show how the great extent of the Ayudha kingdom has so far remained unrealised by our historians.”

I hope the reprint would be useful to the scholars and students of the field.

 

Foreword
To the First Edition

Asiatic Society feels extremely happy to bring out this learned monograph of Professor D. C. Sircar. Professor Sircar, one of the foremost Indologists in the world, delivered the Biman Behari Majumdar Lecture of 1982. The present volume is an outcome of that series of lectures.

The subject of the monograph is of immense historical importance and interest. The complexities of the Tripartite- Struggle have been a subject of intensive historical research for many years. Eminent historians have written on this topic. Yet, many problems have remained unsolved. Vital data have been missing. Professor Sircar has exhaustively discussed with his usual thoroughness and analytical mind the different aspects of the long drawn struggle for political hegemony In Northern India. The result has been most rewarding for all researchers and students of Indian history of this period. So far, scholars had primarily concentrated on the tussle among the Palas, Pratiharas and the Rastrakutas. By including and throwing new light on such aspects as the importance of the Ayudhas. The problem of the Harsa Era, and the relations among the Gahadavalas, the Palas and the Senas, Professor Sircar has added a new dimension to the study of the subject.

One of the major purposes of the Asiatic Society is to publish works of exacting academic standard. We are grateful to Professor Sircar for giving us an opportunity of publishing such a monograph. We are also grateful to him for undertaking the responsibility of supervising the printing-work of the book himself. But unfortunately his repeated illness and sad and sudden demise on January 10, 1985, did not allow him to see it entirely through the press. A member of our Publication Committee Dr. Samaresh Bandyopadhyay has supervised the printing work of the remaining par to the book. Our sincere thanks are due to Dr. Bandyopadhyay.

Professor D.C. Sircar’s monograph. I am sure, will be widely appreciated by scholars in the field and by his peers.

 

Introduction

While publishing the results of my study of the Dubi plates of king Bhaskaravarman (c. 600-50 A.D.) of Kamarupa with particular reference to the light thrown by the Inscription on the struggle between Gauda and Kamarupa in the sixth and seventh centuries A. D.. I drew attention, more than thirty years ago, to a theory of the ancient Indian politicians and Its bearing on the various states rising out of the ruins of the Gupta empire. It was believed that a king (say A) has his natural enemy in the neighbouring ruler (say B) while the ruler (say C) of the territory beyond that of the enemy king (i.e.. B) was a natural enemy of his Immediate neighbour but a natural friend of the distant neighbour (i.e., A) ; and so on. On the fall of the Gupta empire, about the Gupta year 231(550- 51 A. D.) according to a Jam tradition, their Maukhari feudatories, who became independent at Kanauj (ancient Kanyakubja, Kanyakubja. Kanyakubja, etc.), were enemies of their eastern neighbours, the Gaudas of Bengal. as well as of their south-western neighbours, the Later Guptas of Malaya (i.e. East Malwa). The Gaudas, on the other hand, were not only the enemies of their western neighbours, the Maukharis, but also of their north-eastern neighbours, the Bhauma-Lvarakas of Kamarupa (Assam), and at the same time, they were friends of the Later Gupta enemies of the Maukharis. It seems that the Maukharis and Bhauma-Narakas were friends of each other because they were both enemies of the Gaudas. The Later Guptas were originally friends of the Pusyabhutis of Thanesar; but this relationship was disturbed about the beginning of the seventh century A.D... So that the Pusyabhutis allied themselves with the Maukharis. In this case, a so-called natural enemy’ became a friend on the change of circumstances.

While the Gaudas were succeeded In Bengal and Bihar by the Palas and Senas (eighth to thirteenth century), the kingdom of Kanyakubja or Kanauj (Kanol) passed from the Maukharis first to the Pusyabhuti king Hara (seventh century). next to the Maurya house of Yasovarman (eighth century) and then to the Ayudhas (eighth-ninth century). Gurjara-Pratiharas (ninth to eleventh century) and Gahadavalas (eleventh-twelfth century). But the Kanyakubja-Gauda struggle continued throughout the centuries. The latest event associated with the struggle is the Sena claim to have raised pillars of victory at Varanasi and Prayaga in the dominions of the Gahadavalas as found in the records of I.aksmanasena’s successors who ruled in the eastern areas of Bengal in the thirteenth century A. D. However, the Sena-Gahajavala struggle must have ended sometime before the Turkish Musalman occupation of the western part of Laksmanasena’s empire, the date of the Muslim conquest of Gauda being known from the gold Tanka issued by Ikhtiyaruddin Muhammad bin Bakhtiyar Khalji in the name of Muizuddin Muhammad bin Sam to have been the 19th Ramazan in the Hijri year 601 which corresponds to the 10th May. 1205 A.D. As a matter of fact, the Gahadavalas had been subdued by the Turkish Musalmans more than a decade earlier, so that the struggle could not have continued beyond the twelfth century A.D. However, strained relationship between Western Uttar Pradesh region and Bengal has been traced even in the medieval and modem times as well.

The history of the Gauda-Kanyakubja struggle is of considerable importance since certain wrong theories have been propounded by historians without having a clear idea about it. One such belief is that the three great powers. viz., the Palas. Gurjara-Pratiharas and Rastrakutas, were struggling for the supremacy of North India or for the occupation of Kanauj but we have tried here to show that neither did the above powers fight with a singular purpose nor had Kanol acquired a halo of imperialism and was coveted by adventurers as a result thereof before the middle of the ninth century A. D. While the Pratihàra-Rã4rakUta struggle began far away from Kanauj, It became one of the greatest cities of India only under the two centuries of Gurjara-Pratihara rule. We have also bled to show how the great extent of the Ayudha kingdom has so far remained unrealised by our historians. When sometime ago I was invited by the General Secretary of the Asiatic Society. Calcutta. to deliver the Dr. B.B. Majumdar Memorial Lectures for the year 1982. 1 readily agreed to do so because the late Dr. Majumdar was not only a reputed student of history and political science. but also a valued and respected friend of mine, and it was impossible for me to ignore the opportunity offered to me to pay homage to the memory of my late lamented friend.

In April, 1978, 1 delivered some lectures at the Department of Ancient History, Culture and Archaeology of the University of Allahabad as a Visiting Professor there. A few of the topics discussed in the present series were touched in one or two of the lectures delivered on that occasion.

 

Contents

 

  Introduction xi
Chapter I The Country of Pancala and the city of Kanyakubja 1
Chapter II The Theory of Tripartite Struggle and the Importance of the Ayudhas 8
Chapter III The Gauda-Kanyakubja Struggle from the sixth to the Eighth Century A.D. 17
  Appendix I – The Problem of the Harsa Era 22
  1. Controversy about the Era  
  2. Spread of the Era and the Question of its Use in Gauda  
Chapter IV The Gurjara-Pratitharas and the Palas 43
Chapter V The Gahadavalas and the Palas and senas 48
  Appendix II – The Gurjara-Pratiharas and the Rastrakutas 52
  Postscript 59
  Index 63

Sample Pages





Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Philosophical Reflections in the Naisadhacarita (An Old Book)
by Harekrishna Meher
Hardcover (Edition: 1989)
Punthi Pustak
Item Code: NAH107
$35.00$28.00
You save: $7.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
THE UNKNOWN HSUAN-TSANG
by D. DEVAHUTI
Paperback (Edition: 2001)
Oxford University Press.
Item Code: IDG632
$22.50$18.00
You save: $4.50 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Illustrated Susruta Samhita - 3 Volumes
Item Code: IDE458
$125.00$100.00
You save: $25.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The History and Culture of the Indian People (Set of XI Volumes)
by R.C. Majumdar
Hardcover (Edition: 2010)
Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan
Item Code: NAJ001
$355.00$284.00
You save: $71.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
History of Gopachala
by K.D. Bajpai
Hardcover (14 Black & White Plates) (Edition: 2006)
Bharatiya Jnanpith
Item Code: IDI942
$16.50$13.20
You save: $3.30 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
An Insight Into Hindu Philosophy Life and Beyond
Item Code: NAE270
$40.00$32.00
You save: $8.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Indian Caste in Two Volumes (An Old and Rare Book)
Item Code: NAN004
$65.00$52.00
You save: $13.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Life of Hsuan- Tsang: Hui-li and Yen-ts 'ung
by Li Yung -hsi
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
Akshaya Prakashan
Item Code: IDI046
$22.50$18.00
You save: $4.50 (20%)
SOLD
THE BUDDHA AND HIS RELIGION
Item Code: IDC850
$32.50$26.00
You save: $6.50 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Age of Imperial Kanauj: The History and Culture of the Indian People (Volum IV)
by R.C. Majumdar
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan
Item Code: NAI194
$40.00$32.00
You save: $8.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Goddess Durga – The  Divine Energy
Item Code: NAC741
$5.00$4.00
You save: $1.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

Very grateful for this service, of making this precious treasure of Haveli Sangeet for ThakurJi so easily in the US. Appreciate the fact that notation is provided.
Leena, USA.
The Bhairava painting I ordered by Sri Kailash Raj is excellent. I have been purchasing from Exotic India for well over a decade and am always beyond delighted with my extraordinary purchases and customer service. Thank you.
Marc, UK
I have been buying from Exotic India for years and am always pleased and excited to receive my packages. Thanks for the quality products.
Delia, USA
As ever, brilliant price and service.
Howard, UK.
The best and fastest service worldwide - I am in Australia and I put in a big order of books (14 items) on a Wednesday; it was sent on Friday and arrived at my doorstep early on Monday morning - amazing! All very securely packed in a very strong cardboard box. I have bought several times from Exotic India and the service is always exceptionally good. THANK YOU and NAMASTE!
Charles (Rudra)
I just wanted to say that this is I think my 3rd (big) order from you, and the last two times I received immaculate service, the books arrived well and it has been a very pleasant experience. Just wanted to say thanks for your efficient service.
Shantala, Belgium
Thank you so much EXOTIC INDIA for the wonderfull packaging!! I received my order today and it was gift wrapped with so much love and taste in a beautiful golden gift wrap and everything was neat and beautifully packed. Also my order came very fast... i am impressed! Besides selling fantastic items, you provide an exceptional customer service and i will surely purchase again from you! I am very glad and happy :) Thank you, Salma
Salma, Canada.
Artwork received today. Very pleased both with the product quality and speed of delivery. Many thanks for your help.
Carl, UK.
I wanted to let you know how happy we are with our framed pieces of Shree Durga and Shree Kali. Thank you and thank your framers for us. By the way, this month we offered a Puja and Yagna to the Ardhanarishwara murti we purchased from you last November. The Brahmin priest, Shree Vivek Godbol, who was visiting LA preformed the rites. He really loved our murti and thought it very paka. I am so happy to have found your site , it is very paka and trustworthy. Plus such great packing and quick shipping. Thanks for your service Vipin, it is a pleasure.
Gina, USA
My marble statue of Durga arrived today in perfect condition, it's such a beautiful statue. Thanks again for giving me a discount on it, I'm always very pleased with the items I order from you. You always have the best quality items.
Charles, Tennessee
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India