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Books > Language and Literature > The Last Moring Star: Talks on the Enlightened Woman Mystic Daya
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The Last Moring Star: Talks on the Enlightened Woman Mystic Daya
The Last Moring Star: Talks on the Enlightened Woman Mystic Daya
by Osho
Description
From the Jacket

Bear this in mind. When the dissatisfaction you have with things is turned inwards and the contentment that you have towards the inner is turned out-words, you have already become a religious person. You only have to make this small change.

Doubt and trust are like night and day. What is the difference between them? A religious man puts his doubt upon the world and his trust towards the divine. An irreligious man focuses his doubt towards the divine and his trust towards the world.

Introduction

In these discourses, Osho calls all who will hear him to go beyond everything they know or have experienced. "The path of devotion is the path of the heart," he says. "Only the mad succeed there, only those who can laugh and cry with their whole heart, who are not afraid to drink the wine of the divine-because when you drink that wine you will become intoxicated, you will lose all control over your life. Then you will walk when the divine makes you will stand when the divine lifts you up. And although you are being made to walk, you are being made to stand, your life goes on very beautifully, very blissfully. Right now, your life is nothing but sorrow; then your life will be nothing but bliss. But this happens only when our life is not under your control. And that is the fear." To put aside that fear, to trust, is the beginning of a complete transformation of one's life.

Daya and Sahajo were both disciples of the great master, Charandas (1703-1783). Charandas had great respect for the classical Indian traditions of the Upanishads, the Puranas and Hatha yoga, but became famous in his maturity for his ecstatic devotion. He was iconoclastic, indifferent to ritual, opposed to caste, and a major poet. Both Daya and Sahajo were renowned disciples of Charandas, and Sahajo, his cousin, was to succeed him as an important master in her own right after his death. Like Charandas, both his women disciples also wrote poetry.

Osho has spoken on all three of these "singers, poets and madmen," praising the purity of their vision and the strong simplicity of their writing. His discourses on Sahajo bear the title Showering Without Clouds, a phrase drawn from Daya's verse. The title of this volume, The Last Morning Star, is taken from Sahajo's poetry.

In Books I have Loved, Osho describes Daya as "a contemporary of Meera and Sahajo" but "far more profound than either of them." He says: "Daya is a little cuckoo, but don't be worried. In fact it does not have the meaning of being nuts. Daya is really a cuckoo – not nuts, but a sweet singer like the Indian koyal. On an Indian summer night…the distant call of the cuckoo, that's what Daya is…a distant call in the hot summer of this world."

Daya's poetry is carefully crafted, passionate and full of rasa, different poetic moods. It is gentle – flowing naturally and spontaneously. Her poems cover such topics as devotion to the master, continual awareness of the presence of the divine, love and courageous commitment to the spiritual journey, abiding in the company of other seekers, and the final merging with the ultimate through the process of ajapa jap, the "unchanted chanting," the soundless sound, which fills the disciples with awareness of the oneness of existence.

Osho takes up these various topics in his own unique manner, speaking intimately as a lover, a friend, and a master to those seekers for whom Daya's concerns are a natural part of their daily existence. These discourses are filled with beautiful poetry, as in this series of talks Osho is using poems rather than jokes to underline any particular point he is making. As he draws us further along the spiritual path, we are treated to a master's many different ways and methods. He is beguiling as he encourages us to recognize the condition of the world, which is as beautiful and as fleeting as "the last morning star," He is stern with those who are filled with their own importance and learning. He is compassionate as he speaks of the ecstasy and the madness of the enlightned mystics – drunk with the divine – who laugh and sing, fall down, rise up again, and who "put their feet in one spot, but they land elsewhere." He points to the mystery which is experienced when the disciple lets go of the master's hand and enters into the light of existence, still full of love for the master.

Here, the Sufi master, Mulla Nasruddin, is present in many jokes and anecdotes and there are many other delightful stories as well. In the second discourse, Osho tells the story of a Sufi fakir, meditating each day in the forest, and an old woodcutter. The fakir encourages the old man to go further and further into the forest. In turn, the old man finds a copper mine, a silver mine and then a gold mine. Still the fakir insists. The old man is now comfortable for the first time in his life. He and his children are well provided for. But he goes further, and finds a diamond mine. Still the fakir calls him on, "Go further." The old man asks: "What could be better than diamonds?" And the fakir replies: "I am better than diamonds. Come." The old man does come, and from just sitting with the mystic he is filled with absolute peace and bliss. Yet even here the fakir insists: "Go further, go further. There is more."

As Osho insists: "These verses of Daya are unique. They can bring a total revolution in your life. Daya says, 'A tiny spark of fire burns the greatest forest.' If even a tiny spark of these verses falls into you, your darkness will be completely destroyed." Come, come further.

Back of the Book

"The last morning star" symbolizes all that is ephemeral in the world. Talking on the playful and provocative poetry of Daya, Osho takes us on a journey from the transient, from our world outside, to the eternal, our boundless world within. This is a journey of the heart – the joyous, spontaneous, and at times uncompromising way of an enlightened woman mystic.

Search. If meditation doesn't suit you, search through love. If meditation doesn't suit you, search through devotion. But search you must. Don't console yourself by elaborating on the difficulties and saying that you cannot start because of these difficulties. If one has to start, one has to start.

Contents

1 Remembering the Divine 1
2Love Can Wait for Lifetimes49
3The Last Morning Star93
4A Pure Flame of Love141
5Going Beyond Time183
6Receiving Your Soul229
7The Shine of Countless Suns273
8Running with Your Whole Heart317
9The Golden Alchemy363
10Completing the Circle409
About Osho449
Further Information452

The Last Moring Star: Talks on the Enlightened Woman Mystic Daya

Item Code:
IDK583
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2005
Publisher:
ISBN:
8172611641
Size:
8.3" X 5.8"
Pages:
463
Price:
$30.00   Shipping Free
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From the Jacket

Bear this in mind. When the dissatisfaction you have with things is turned inwards and the contentment that you have towards the inner is turned out-words, you have already become a religious person. You only have to make this small change.

Doubt and trust are like night and day. What is the difference between them? A religious man puts his doubt upon the world and his trust towards the divine. An irreligious man focuses his doubt towards the divine and his trust towards the world.

Introduction

In these discourses, Osho calls all who will hear him to go beyond everything they know or have experienced. "The path of devotion is the path of the heart," he says. "Only the mad succeed there, only those who can laugh and cry with their whole heart, who are not afraid to drink the wine of the divine-because when you drink that wine you will become intoxicated, you will lose all control over your life. Then you will walk when the divine makes you will stand when the divine lifts you up. And although you are being made to walk, you are being made to stand, your life goes on very beautifully, very blissfully. Right now, your life is nothing but sorrow; then your life will be nothing but bliss. But this happens only when our life is not under your control. And that is the fear." To put aside that fear, to trust, is the beginning of a complete transformation of one's life.

Daya and Sahajo were both disciples of the great master, Charandas (1703-1783). Charandas had great respect for the classical Indian traditions of the Upanishads, the Puranas and Hatha yoga, but became famous in his maturity for his ecstatic devotion. He was iconoclastic, indifferent to ritual, opposed to caste, and a major poet. Both Daya and Sahajo were renowned disciples of Charandas, and Sahajo, his cousin, was to succeed him as an important master in her own right after his death. Like Charandas, both his women disciples also wrote poetry.

Osho has spoken on all three of these "singers, poets and madmen," praising the purity of their vision and the strong simplicity of their writing. His discourses on Sahajo bear the title Showering Without Clouds, a phrase drawn from Daya's verse. The title of this volume, The Last Morning Star, is taken from Sahajo's poetry.

In Books I have Loved, Osho describes Daya as "a contemporary of Meera and Sahajo" but "far more profound than either of them." He says: "Daya is a little cuckoo, but don't be worried. In fact it does not have the meaning of being nuts. Daya is really a cuckoo – not nuts, but a sweet singer like the Indian koyal. On an Indian summer night…the distant call of the cuckoo, that's what Daya is…a distant call in the hot summer of this world."

Daya's poetry is carefully crafted, passionate and full of rasa, different poetic moods. It is gentle – flowing naturally and spontaneously. Her poems cover such topics as devotion to the master, continual awareness of the presence of the divine, love and courageous commitment to the spiritual journey, abiding in the company of other seekers, and the final merging with the ultimate through the process of ajapa jap, the "unchanted chanting," the soundless sound, which fills the disciples with awareness of the oneness of existence.

Osho takes up these various topics in his own unique manner, speaking intimately as a lover, a friend, and a master to those seekers for whom Daya's concerns are a natural part of their daily existence. These discourses are filled with beautiful poetry, as in this series of talks Osho is using poems rather than jokes to underline any particular point he is making. As he draws us further along the spiritual path, we are treated to a master's many different ways and methods. He is beguiling as he encourages us to recognize the condition of the world, which is as beautiful and as fleeting as "the last morning star," He is stern with those who are filled with their own importance and learning. He is compassionate as he speaks of the ecstasy and the madness of the enlightned mystics – drunk with the divine – who laugh and sing, fall down, rise up again, and who "put their feet in one spot, but they land elsewhere." He points to the mystery which is experienced when the disciple lets go of the master's hand and enters into the light of existence, still full of love for the master.

Here, the Sufi master, Mulla Nasruddin, is present in many jokes and anecdotes and there are many other delightful stories as well. In the second discourse, Osho tells the story of a Sufi fakir, meditating each day in the forest, and an old woodcutter. The fakir encourages the old man to go further and further into the forest. In turn, the old man finds a copper mine, a silver mine and then a gold mine. Still the fakir insists. The old man is now comfortable for the first time in his life. He and his children are well provided for. But he goes further, and finds a diamond mine. Still the fakir calls him on, "Go further." The old man asks: "What could be better than diamonds?" And the fakir replies: "I am better than diamonds. Come." The old man does come, and from just sitting with the mystic he is filled with absolute peace and bliss. Yet even here the fakir insists: "Go further, go further. There is more."

As Osho insists: "These verses of Daya are unique. They can bring a total revolution in your life. Daya says, 'A tiny spark of fire burns the greatest forest.' If even a tiny spark of these verses falls into you, your darkness will be completely destroyed." Come, come further.

Back of the Book

"The last morning star" symbolizes all that is ephemeral in the world. Talking on the playful and provocative poetry of Daya, Osho takes us on a journey from the transient, from our world outside, to the eternal, our boundless world within. This is a journey of the heart – the joyous, spontaneous, and at times uncompromising way of an enlightened woman mystic.

Search. If meditation doesn't suit you, search through love. If meditation doesn't suit you, search through devotion. But search you must. Don't console yourself by elaborating on the difficulties and saying that you cannot start because of these difficulties. If one has to start, one has to start.

Contents

1 Remembering the Divine 1
2Love Can Wait for Lifetimes49
3The Last Morning Star93
4A Pure Flame of Love141
5Going Beyond Time183
6Receiving Your Soul229
7The Shine of Countless Suns273
8Running with Your Whole Heart317
9The Golden Alchemy363
10Completing the Circle409
About Osho449
Further Information452
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