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Books > Yoga > Letters on Yoga (Set of 4 Volumes)
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Letters on Yoga (Set of 4  Volumes)
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Vol-I

Back of The Book

Letters on Yoga – I contains letters of Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. He wrote most of these letters in the 1930s to disciples living in his Ashram in Pondicherry. The main themes are:

The Divine, the cosmos and the individual
The parts of the being and the planes of consciousness
The evolutionary process and the Supermind
The place of the Divine Grace and the Guru in the Yoga
Problems of philosophy, science, religion and Society
Questions of spiritual and occult knowledge

“The faith in spiritual things that is asked of a sadhak is not an ignorant but a luminous faith, a faith in light and not in darkness. It is called blind by the sceptical intellect because it refuses to be guided by outer appearances or seeming facts, - for it looks to the truth behind, - and does not walk on the crutches of proof and evidence. It is an intuition, - an intuition not only waiting for experience to justify it, but leading towards experience. If I believe in self-healing, I shall after a time find out the way to heal myself – if I have faith in transformation, I can end by laying my hand on and unraveling the whole process of transformation. But if I being with doubt and go on with more doubt, how far am I likely to go on the journey?”

About The Author

Sri Aurobindo was born in Calcutta on 15 August 1872. At the age of seven he was taken to England for his education. He studied at St. Paul’s School, London, and at King’s College, Cambridge. Returning to India in 1893, he worked for the next thirteen years in the Princely State of Baroda in the service of the Maharaja and as a professor in the State’s college.

In 1906 Sri Aurobindo quit his post in Baroda and went to Calcutta, where he became one of the leaders of the Indian nationalist movement. As editor of the newspaper Bande Mataram, he put forward the idea of complete independence from Britain. Arrested both for sedition and for treason, he was released for lack of evidence.

Sri Aurobindo began the practice of Yoga in 1905. Within a few years he achieved several fundamental spiritual realisation. In 1910 he withdrew from politics and went to Pondicherry in French India in order to concentrate on inner life and work. Over the next forty years, he developed a new spiritual path, the integral Yoga, whose ultimate aim is the transformation of life by the power of a supramental consciousness. In 1926, with the help of his spiritual collaborator the Mother, he founded the Sri Aurobindo Ashram. His vision of life is presented in numerous works of prose and poetry, among the best known of which are The Life Divine, The synthesis of Yoga, Essays on the Gita and Savitri. Sri Aurobindo passed away on 5 December 1950.

Publisher’s Note

Letters on Yoga - I comprises letters written by Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. It is the first of four volumes of Letters on Yoga, arranged by the editors as follows:

I. Foundations of the Integral Yoga

II. Practice of the Integral Yoga

III. Experiences and Realisations in the Integral Yoga

IV. Transformation of Human Nature in the Integral Yoga

The letters in these volumes have been selected from the large body of letters that Sri Aurobindo wrote to disciples and others between 1927 and 1950. Other letters from this period are published in Letters on Poetry and Art and Letters on Himself and the Ashram, volumes 27 and 35 of The Complete Works Sri Aurobindo. Letters written before 1927 are reproduced in Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, volume 36 of The Complete Works.

During Sri Aurobindo's lifetime, relatively few of his letters were published. Three small books of letters on Yoga were brought out in the 1930s. A more substantial collection came out between 1947 and 1951 in a four-volume series entitled Letters of Sri Aurobindo (including one volume of letters on poetry and literature). In 1958, many more letters were included in the two large tomes of On Yoga - II. A further expanded collection in three volumes entitled Letters on Yoga was published in 1970 as part of the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. The present collection, also entitled Letters on Yoga, constitutes volumes 28-31 of The Complete Works. These volumes incorporate previously published letters and contain many new ones as well. About one-third of the letters in the present volume were not published in the Centenary Library.

The present volume is arranged by subject in five parts:

1. The Divine, the Cosmos and the Individual

2. The Parts of the Being and the Planes of Consciousness

3. The Evolutionary Process and the Supermind

4. Problems of Philosophy, Science, Religion and Society

5. Questions of Spiritual and Occult Knowledge

Contents

Part One The Divine, The Cosmos And The Individual
Section One The Divine, Sachidananda, Brahman and Atman
The Divine and Its Aspects 5-12
Sachidananda: Existence, Consciousness-force and Bliss 13-27
Brahma 28-29
The Self or Atman 30-32
Section Two The Cosmos: Terms from India Systems
The Upanisadic and Puranic Systems 37-39
The Sankhya-Yoga System 40-51
Section Three The Jivatman and the Psychic Being
The Jivatman in the Integral Yoga 55-66
The Jivatman in Other Indian Systems 68
Part Two The Parts of The Being And The Planes of Consciousness
Section One The Organisation of the Being
The Parts of the Being 79-80
Classification of the Parts of the Being 82
Section Two The Concentric System: Outer to Inner
The Outer Being and the Inner Being 89-95
The True Being and the True Consciousness 97-99
The Psychic Being 102-124
Section Three The Vertical System: Supermind to Subconscient
The Planes or Worlds of Consciousness 127-132
The Supermind or Supramental 133-151
The Overmind 152-156
The Higher Planes of Mind 158-164
The Lower Nature of Lower Hemisphere 166-167
The Mind 168-184
The Vital Being and Vital Consciousness 185-198
The Physical Consciousness 200-212
The Environmental Consciousness 213-215
The Subconscient and the Inconscient 216-225
Section Four The Chakras or Centres of Consciousness
The System of the Chakras 229-244
The Parts of the Body and the Centres 245-247
Part Three The Evolutionary Process and The Supermind
Section One The Supramental Evolution
The Problem of Suffering and Evil 253-262
Spiritual Evolution and the Supramental 265-280
Section Two The Supramental Descent and Transformation
The Descent of the Supermind 287-292
Descent and Transformation 294-299
The Supermental Transformation 301-303
Transformation and the Body 305-315
Part Four Problems of Philosophy, Science, Religion And Society
Section One Thought, Philosophy, Science and Yoga
The Intellect and Yoga 321-330
Doubt and Faith 337-348
Philosophical Thought and Yoga 351-375
Science and Yoga 380-408
Section Two Religion, Idealism, Morality and Yoga
Religion and Yoga 411-415
Idealism and Spirituality 416-417
Morality and Yoga 419-437
Social Duties and the Divine 438-444
Part Five Questions Of Spiritual And Occult Knowledge
Section One The Divine and the Hostile Powers
Terminology 449-450
The Gods 456-459
The Hostile Forces and Hostile Beings 461-463
Section Two The Avatar and the Vibhuti
The Meaning and Purpose of Avatarhood 471-485
Specific Avatars and Vibhutis 487-502
Human Greatness 504-505
Section Three Destiny, Karma, Death and Rebirth
Fate, Free Will and Prediction 509-519
Karma and Heredity 520-522
Death 526-529
Rebirth 532-554
Section Four Occult Knowledge and Powers
Occult Knowledge 559-569
Occult Powers or Siddhis 571-580
Note on The Texts 581

Vol-II

Back of The Book

Letters on Yoga-II contains letters of Sri Aurobindo on the practice of his system of Yoga. He wrote most of these letters in the 1930s to disciples living in his Ashram in Pondicherry. The main themes are:

The aim of the Integral Yoga
The qualities needed to practice this Yoga
The foundation of peace and equality
The place of the Divine Grace and the Guru
The synthetic method of knowledge, works devotion and self-perfection
The differences between this Yoga and other spiritual paths

“To find the Divine is indeed the first reason for seeking the spiritual Truth and the spiritual life; it is the one thing indispensable and all the rest is nothing without it. We must find the Self, the Divine, then only can we know what is the work the Self or the Divine demands from us. Until then our life and action can only be a help or means towards finding the Divine and it ought not to have any other purpose.”

Publisher’s Note

Letters on Yoga - II comprises letters written by Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. It is the first of four volumes of Letters on Yoga, arranged by the editors as follows:

I. Foundations of the Integral Yoga

II. Practice of the Integral Yoga

III. Experiences and Realisations in the Integral Yoga

IV. Transformation of Human Nature in the Integral Yoga

The letters in these volumes have been selected from the large body of letters that Sri Aurobindo wrote to disciples and others between 1927 and 1950. Other letters from this period are published in Letters on Poetry and Art and Letters on Himself and the Ashram, volumes 27 and 35 of The Complete Works Sri Aurobindo. Letters written before 1927 are reproduced in Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, volume 36 of The Complete Works.

During Sri Aurobindo's lifetime, relatively few of his letters were published. Three small books of letters on Yoga were brought out in the 1930s. A more substantial collection came out between 1947 and 1951 in a four-volume series entitled Letters of Sri Aurobindo (including one volume of letters on poetry and literature). In 1958, many more letters were included in the two large tomes of On Yoga - II. A further expanded collection in three volumes entitled Letters on Yoga was published in 1970 as part of the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. The present collection, also entitled Letters on Yoga, constitutes volumes 28-31 of The Complete Works. These volumes incorporate previously published letters and contain many new ones as well. About one-third of the letters in the present volume were not published in the Centenary Library.

The present volume is arranged by subject in three parts:

1. The Path of the Integral Yoga

2. The Synthetic Method of the Integral Yoga

3. The Integral Yoga and Others Spiritual Paths

Contents

Part One The Path of The Integral Yoga
Section One The Path and the Goal
Seeking the Divine 5-15
The Aim of the Integral Yoga 19-23
Section Two Basic Requisites of the Path
The Call and the Capacity 27-36
Qualities Needed for Sadhana 42-43
Purity 46-48
Sincerity 50-54
Aspiration 55-63
Rejection 64
Surrender 67-82
Faith 88-101
Consecration and Offering 103-104
Opening 105-106
Patience and Perseverance 110-118
Vigilance 119
Section Three The Foundation of the Sadhana
Peace - The Basis of the Sadhana 123-125
Equality - The Chief Support 129-134
Quiet and Calm 137-145
Peace 148-156
Silence 158-162
Section Four
The Divine Response
The Divine Grace and Guidance 167-175
The Divine Force 179-188
The Guru 190-200
Part Two The Synthetic Method of the Integral Yoga
Section One A Yoga of Knowledge, Works, Bhakti and Self-Perfection
The Central Processes of the Sadhana 207-215
Combining Work, Meditation and Bhakti 216-227
Section Two Sadhana through Work
Work and Yoga 231-253
Becoming Conscious in Work 254-264
The Divine Force in Work 266-274
Practical Concerns in Work 276-287
Creative Activity 290-294
Section Three Sadhana through Concentration, Meditation and Japa
Concentration and Meditation 297-319
Mantra and Japa 322-328
Section Four Sadhana through Love and Devotion
Divine Love, Psychic Love and Human Love 333-347
Bhakti, Devotion, Worship 350-365
Part Three The Integral Yoga and Other Spiritual Paths
Section One A Yoga of Transformation
Distinctive Features of the Integral Yoga 373-379
Asceticism and the Integral Yoga 380-387
A Realistic Adwaita 391-
Transformation in the Integral Yoga 398-407
Section Two Other Spiritual Paths and the Integral Yoga
The Newness of the Integral Yoga 411-416
The Veda and the Upanishads 417-425
Jainism and Buddhism 428-434
Sankhya and Yoga 437-439
The Yoga of the Bhagavad Gita 441-444
The Adwaita of Shankaracharya 447-457
Tantra 459-464
Bhakti Yoga and Vaishnavism 465-494
The Teachings of Some Modern Indian Yogis 496-500
Christianity and Theosophy 504-511
Note on The Texts 515

Vol-III

Back of The Book

Letters on Yoga-III contains letters of Sri Aurobindo on the experiences and realizations that may occur in the practice of his system of Yoga. He wrote most of these letters in the 1930s to disciples living in his Ashram in Pondicherry. The main themes are:

The place of experiences in the Integral Yoga
The movement inward, the opening of the inner senses, and the discovery of the inner being
The finding of the psychic being or soul
Widening into the cosmic consciousness
The movement upward to experience the Self, the One, and the Infinite
The movement of ascent and descent to bring about the spiritual transformation
“Letters to live within, to act always from within, from constant inner communion with the Mother. It may be difficult at first to do it always and completely, but it can be done if one sticks to it – and it is at that price, by learning to do that that one can have the siddhi in the Yoga.”

Publisher’s Note

Letters on Yoga - III comprises letters written by Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. It is the first of four volumes of Letters on Yoga, arranged by the editors as follows:

I. Foundations of the Integral Yoga

II. Practice of the Integral Yoga

III. Experiences and Realisations in the Integral Yoga

IV. Transformation of Human Nature in the Integral Yoga

The letters in these volumes have been selected from the large body of letters that Sri Aurobindo wrote to disciples and others between 1927 and 1950. Other letters from this period are published in Letters on Poetry and Art and Letters on Himself and the Ashram, volumes 27 and 35 of The Complete Works Sri Aurobindo. Letters written before 1927 are reproduced in Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, volume 36 of The Complete Works.

During Sri Aurobindo's lifetime, relatively few of his letters were published. Three small books of letters on Yoga were brought out in the 1930s. A more substantial collection came out between 1947 and 1951 in a four-volume series entitled Letters of Sri Aurobindo (including one volume of letters on poetry and literature). In 1958, many more letters were included in the two large tomes of On Yoga - II. A further expanded collection in three volumes entitled Letters on Yoga was published in 1970 as part of the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. The present collection, also entitled Letters on Yoga, constitutes volumes 28-31 of The Complete Works. These volumes incorporate previously published letters and contain many new ones as well. About one-third of the letters in the present volume were not published in the Centenary Library.

The present volume is arranged by subject in four parts:

1. The Place of Experiences in the Practice of Yoga

2. The Opening of the Inner Sense

3. Experiences of the Inner Consciousness and the Cosmic Consciousness

4. The Fundamental Realisations of the Integral Yoga

Contents

Part One The Place of Experiences In The Practice of Yoga
Section One The Nature and Value of Experiences
Experiences and Realisations 5-12
The Value of Experiences 13-14
Inner Experience and Outer Life 21-26
The Danger of the Ego and the Need of Purification 29-44
Suggestions for Dealing with Experiences 47-52
Section Two Vicissitudes on the Way to Realisation
Variations in the Intensity of Experience 57-70
Emptiness, Voidness, Blankness and Silence 72-81
Part Two The Opening of The Inner Senses
Section One Visions, Sounds, Smells and Tastes
The Value of Visions 87-97
Kinds of Vision 98-108
Subtle Sights, Sounds, Smells and Tastes 111-113
Section Two Lights and Colours
Light 117-120
Colours 122-134
Section Three Symbols
Symbols and Symbolic Visions 137-139
Sun, Moon, Star, Fire 142-147
Sky, Weather, Night and Drawn 148-149
Water and Bodies of Water 150-151
Earth 152-153
Gods, Goddesses and Semi-Divine Beings 155-159
The Human World 160-164
The Animal World 165-176
The Plant World 177-180
Constructions 181-181
Objects 183-187
Numbers and Letters 188-188
Part Three Experiences of the Inner Consciousness and the Cosmic Consciousness
Section One Experiences on the Inner Planes
Experiences on the Subtle Physical, Vital and Mental Planes 193-203
Exteriorisaton or Going Out of the Body 205-206
Section Two Experiences of the Inner Being and the Inner Consciousness
The Inward Movement 211-236
Inner Detachment and the Witness Attitude 238-246
Inner Experiences in the State of Samadhi 248-256
Three Experiences of the Inner Being 257-262
Section Three Experiences of the Cosmic Consciousness
The Universal or Cosmic Consciousness 267-279
Aspects of the Cosmic Consciousness 281-285
The Universal or Cosmic Forces 287-290
Section Four The Dangers of Inner and Cosmic Experiences
The Intermediate Zone 295-306
Inner Voices and Indications 308-309
Part Four The Fundamental Realisations of the Integral Yoga
Section One Three Stages of Transformation: Psychic, Spiritual, Supramental
The Psychic and Spiritual Realisations 319-323
Conditions of Transformation 331-333
Section Two The Psychic Opening, Emergence and Transformation
The Psychic Being and Its Role in Sadhana 337-344
The Psychic Opening 347-352
The Emergence or Coming Forward of the Psychic 354-362
Experiences Associated with the Psychic 367-378
The Psychic and Spiritual Transformations 380-387
Section Three Spiritual Experiences and Realisations
Experiences of the Self, the One and the Infinite 391-399
Experiences on the Higher Planes 401-411
Section Four The Spiritual Transformation
Ascent and Descent 415-425
Ascent to the Higher Planes 428-439
The Descent of the Higher Consciousness and Force 441-447
The Descent of the Higher Powers 449-462
Descent and Other Kinds of Experience 463-466
Feelings and Sensations in the Process of Descent 469-477
Difficulties Experienced in the Process of Descent 479-485
Descent and the Lower Nature 487-497
Note on The Texts 499

Vol-IV

Back of The Book

Letters on Yoga – IV contains letters of Sri Aurobindo on the transformation of human nature – mental, vital and physical – through the practice of Integral Yoga. It also contains letters on the difficulties encountered in practising this Yoga. Most of these letters were written by Sri Aurobindo in the 1930s to disciples living in his Ashram in Pondicherry. The main themes are:

Sadhana on the level of the mind: mental difficulties; cultivation of the mind; power of expression; speech

Sadhana on the level of the vital: the vital nature; vital temperament and vital defects; human relations and interactions

Sadhana on the physical, subconscient and inconscient levels: transformation of the physical; food, sleep, dreams and sex; illness doctors and medicines

Difficulties in the practice of Yoga: kinds of difficulty, overcoming difficulties, the opposition of the hostile Forces

“It is the lesson of life that always in this world everything fails a man – only the Divine does not fail him, if he turns entirely to the Divine. It is not because there is something bad in you that blows fall on you, - blows fall on all human beings because they are full of desire for things that cannot last and they lose them or, even if they get, it brings disappointment and cannot satisfy them. To turn to the Divine is the only truth in life.”

Publisher’s Note

Letters on Yoga - IV comprises letters written by Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. It is the first of four volumes of Letters on Yoga, arranged by the editors as follows:

I. Foundations of the Integral Yoga

II. Practice of the Integral Yoga

III. Experiences and Realisations in the Integral Yoga

IV. Transformation of Human Nature in the Integral Yoga

The letters in these volumes have been selected from the large body of letters that Sri Aurobindo wrote to disciples and others between 1927 and 1950. Other letters from this period are published in Letters on Poetry and Art and Letters on Himself and the Ashram, volumes 27 and 35 of The Complete Works Sri Aurobindo. Letters written before 1927 are reproduced in Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, volume 36 of The Complete Works.

During Sri Aurobindo's lifetime, relatively few of his letters were published. Three small books of letters on Yoga were brought out in the 1930s. A more substantial collection came out between 1947 and 1951 in a four-volume series entitled Letters of Sri Aurobindo (including one volume of letters on poetry and literature). In 1958, many more letters were included in the two large tomes of On Yoga - II. A further expanded collection in three volumes entitled Letters on Yoga was published in 1970 as part of the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. The present collection, also entitled Letters on Yoga, constitutes volumes 28-31 of The Complete Works. These volumes incorporate previously published letters and contain many new ones as well. About one-third of the letters in the present volume were not published in the Centenary Library.

The present volume is arranged by subject in four parts:

1. Sadhana on the Level of the Mind

2. Sadhana on the Level of the Vital

3. Sadhana on the Physical, Subconscient and Inconscient Levels

4. Difficulties in the Practice of the Integral Yoga

Contents

Part One Sadhana on the Level of the Mind
Section One The Mind and Sadhana
The Mind and Other Levels of Being 5-9
Intellect and the Intellectual 11-18
Mental Difficulties and the Need of Quietude 20-27
The Physical Mind and Sadhana 30-39
Thought and Knowledge 40-56
Section Two Cultivation of the Mind in Yoga
Mental Development and Sadhana 59-65
The Place of Study in Sadhana 69-75
The Power of Experession and Yoga 76-78
Speech and Yoga 80-94
Part Two Sadhana on the Level of the Vital
Section One The Vital Being and Sadhana
The Nature of the Vital 101-114
The Vital and Other Levels of Being 116-127
Wrong Movements of the Vital 129-148
The Lower Vital Being 150-169
Section Two Vital Temperament
Cheerfulness and Happiness 173-175
Sorrow and Suffering 177-180
Depression and Despondency 182-206
Sentimentalism, Sensitiveness, Instability, Laxity 210-214
Section Three Vital Defects
Ego and Its Forms 217-250
Desire 251-264
Anger and Violence 267-279
Fear 278
Section Four Human Relations in Yoga
Human Relations and the Spiritual Life 283-310
Interactions with Others and the Practice of Yoga 312-344
Problems in Human Relations 346-352
Part Three Sadhana on the Physical, Subconscient and Inconscient Levels
Section One Sadhana on the Level of the Physical
The Transformation of the Physical 359-367
Levels of the Physical Being 372-387
Difficulties of the Physical Nature 388-415
Section Two Food, Sleep, Dreams and Sex
Food 419-435
Sleep 437-452
Dreams 455-477
Sex 485-545
Section Three Illness, Doctors and Medicines
Illness and Health 549-575
Doctors and Medicines 578-584
Specific Illness, Ailments and Other Physical Problems 586-590
Section Four The Subconscient and the Inconscient and the Process of Yoga
The Subconscient and the Integral Yoga 595-612
The Inconscient and the Integral Yoga 617
Part Four Difficulties in the Practice of the Integral Yoga
Section One Difficulties of the Path
The Difficulties of Yoga 625-635
The Difficulties of Human Nature 638-653
Imperfections and Periods of Arrest 655-663
Resistances, Sufferings and Falls 667-674
Section Two Overcoming the Difficulties of Yoga
The Right Attitude towards Difficulties 681-694
Steps towards Overcoming Difficulties 696-699
Vigilance, Resolution, Will and the Divine Help 709-724
Time and Change of the Nature 726-732
Dealing with Despression and Despondency 734-747
Section Three The Opposition of the Hostile Forces
The Hostile Forces and the Difficulties of Yoga 757-768
Attacks by the Hostile Forces 769-780
Dealing with Hostile Attacks 782-797
Accidents, Possession, Madness 800-806
Note on The Texts 813

Vol-I













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Letters on Yoga (Set of 4 Volumes)

Item Code:
NAK732
Cover:
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Edition:
2015
ISBN:
9788170589532
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
2520
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Weight of the Book: 3.3 kg
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Vol-I

Back of The Book

Letters on Yoga – I contains letters of Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. He wrote most of these letters in the 1930s to disciples living in his Ashram in Pondicherry. The main themes are:

The Divine, the cosmos and the individual
The parts of the being and the planes of consciousness
The evolutionary process and the Supermind
The place of the Divine Grace and the Guru in the Yoga
Problems of philosophy, science, religion and Society
Questions of spiritual and occult knowledge

“The faith in spiritual things that is asked of a sadhak is not an ignorant but a luminous faith, a faith in light and not in darkness. It is called blind by the sceptical intellect because it refuses to be guided by outer appearances or seeming facts, - for it looks to the truth behind, - and does not walk on the crutches of proof and evidence. It is an intuition, - an intuition not only waiting for experience to justify it, but leading towards experience. If I believe in self-healing, I shall after a time find out the way to heal myself – if I have faith in transformation, I can end by laying my hand on and unraveling the whole process of transformation. But if I being with doubt and go on with more doubt, how far am I likely to go on the journey?”

About The Author

Sri Aurobindo was born in Calcutta on 15 August 1872. At the age of seven he was taken to England for his education. He studied at St. Paul’s School, London, and at King’s College, Cambridge. Returning to India in 1893, he worked for the next thirteen years in the Princely State of Baroda in the service of the Maharaja and as a professor in the State’s college.

In 1906 Sri Aurobindo quit his post in Baroda and went to Calcutta, where he became one of the leaders of the Indian nationalist movement. As editor of the newspaper Bande Mataram, he put forward the idea of complete independence from Britain. Arrested both for sedition and for treason, he was released for lack of evidence.

Sri Aurobindo began the practice of Yoga in 1905. Within a few years he achieved several fundamental spiritual realisation. In 1910 he withdrew from politics and went to Pondicherry in French India in order to concentrate on inner life and work. Over the next forty years, he developed a new spiritual path, the integral Yoga, whose ultimate aim is the transformation of life by the power of a supramental consciousness. In 1926, with the help of his spiritual collaborator the Mother, he founded the Sri Aurobindo Ashram. His vision of life is presented in numerous works of prose and poetry, among the best known of which are The Life Divine, The synthesis of Yoga, Essays on the Gita and Savitri. Sri Aurobindo passed away on 5 December 1950.

Publisher’s Note

Letters on Yoga - I comprises letters written by Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. It is the first of four volumes of Letters on Yoga, arranged by the editors as follows:

I. Foundations of the Integral Yoga

II. Practice of the Integral Yoga

III. Experiences and Realisations in the Integral Yoga

IV. Transformation of Human Nature in the Integral Yoga

The letters in these volumes have been selected from the large body of letters that Sri Aurobindo wrote to disciples and others between 1927 and 1950. Other letters from this period are published in Letters on Poetry and Art and Letters on Himself and the Ashram, volumes 27 and 35 of The Complete Works Sri Aurobindo. Letters written before 1927 are reproduced in Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, volume 36 of The Complete Works.

During Sri Aurobindo's lifetime, relatively few of his letters were published. Three small books of letters on Yoga were brought out in the 1930s. A more substantial collection came out between 1947 and 1951 in a four-volume series entitled Letters of Sri Aurobindo (including one volume of letters on poetry and literature). In 1958, many more letters were included in the two large tomes of On Yoga - II. A further expanded collection in three volumes entitled Letters on Yoga was published in 1970 as part of the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. The present collection, also entitled Letters on Yoga, constitutes volumes 28-31 of The Complete Works. These volumes incorporate previously published letters and contain many new ones as well. About one-third of the letters in the present volume were not published in the Centenary Library.

The present volume is arranged by subject in five parts:

1. The Divine, the Cosmos and the Individual

2. The Parts of the Being and the Planes of Consciousness

3. The Evolutionary Process and the Supermind

4. Problems of Philosophy, Science, Religion and Society

5. Questions of Spiritual and Occult Knowledge

Contents

Part One The Divine, The Cosmos And The Individual
Section One The Divine, Sachidananda, Brahman and Atman
The Divine and Its Aspects 5-12
Sachidananda: Existence, Consciousness-force and Bliss 13-27
Brahma 28-29
The Self or Atman 30-32
Section Two The Cosmos: Terms from India Systems
The Upanisadic and Puranic Systems 37-39
The Sankhya-Yoga System 40-51
Section Three The Jivatman and the Psychic Being
The Jivatman in the Integral Yoga 55-66
The Jivatman in Other Indian Systems 68
Part Two The Parts of The Being And The Planes of Consciousness
Section One The Organisation of the Being
The Parts of the Being 79-80
Classification of the Parts of the Being 82
Section Two The Concentric System: Outer to Inner
The Outer Being and the Inner Being 89-95
The True Being and the True Consciousness 97-99
The Psychic Being 102-124
Section Three The Vertical System: Supermind to Subconscient
The Planes or Worlds of Consciousness 127-132
The Supermind or Supramental 133-151
The Overmind 152-156
The Higher Planes of Mind 158-164
The Lower Nature of Lower Hemisphere 166-167
The Mind 168-184
The Vital Being and Vital Consciousness 185-198
The Physical Consciousness 200-212
The Environmental Consciousness 213-215
The Subconscient and the Inconscient 216-225
Section Four The Chakras or Centres of Consciousness
The System of the Chakras 229-244
The Parts of the Body and the Centres 245-247
Part Three The Evolutionary Process and The Supermind
Section One The Supramental Evolution
The Problem of Suffering and Evil 253-262
Spiritual Evolution and the Supramental 265-280
Section Two The Supramental Descent and Transformation
The Descent of the Supermind 287-292
Descent and Transformation 294-299
The Supermental Transformation 301-303
Transformation and the Body 305-315
Part Four Problems of Philosophy, Science, Religion And Society
Section One Thought, Philosophy, Science and Yoga
The Intellect and Yoga 321-330
Doubt and Faith 337-348
Philosophical Thought and Yoga 351-375
Science and Yoga 380-408
Section Two Religion, Idealism, Morality and Yoga
Religion and Yoga 411-415
Idealism and Spirituality 416-417
Morality and Yoga 419-437
Social Duties and the Divine 438-444
Part Five Questions Of Spiritual And Occult Knowledge
Section One The Divine and the Hostile Powers
Terminology 449-450
The Gods 456-459
The Hostile Forces and Hostile Beings 461-463
Section Two The Avatar and the Vibhuti
The Meaning and Purpose of Avatarhood 471-485
Specific Avatars and Vibhutis 487-502
Human Greatness 504-505
Section Three Destiny, Karma, Death and Rebirth
Fate, Free Will and Prediction 509-519
Karma and Heredity 520-522
Death 526-529
Rebirth 532-554
Section Four Occult Knowledge and Powers
Occult Knowledge 559-569
Occult Powers or Siddhis 571-580
Note on The Texts 581

Vol-II

Back of The Book

Letters on Yoga-II contains letters of Sri Aurobindo on the practice of his system of Yoga. He wrote most of these letters in the 1930s to disciples living in his Ashram in Pondicherry. The main themes are:

The aim of the Integral Yoga
The qualities needed to practice this Yoga
The foundation of peace and equality
The place of the Divine Grace and the Guru
The synthetic method of knowledge, works devotion and self-perfection
The differences between this Yoga and other spiritual paths

“To find the Divine is indeed the first reason for seeking the spiritual Truth and the spiritual life; it is the one thing indispensable and all the rest is nothing without it. We must find the Self, the Divine, then only can we know what is the work the Self or the Divine demands from us. Until then our life and action can only be a help or means towards finding the Divine and it ought not to have any other purpose.”

Publisher’s Note

Letters on Yoga - II comprises letters written by Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. It is the first of four volumes of Letters on Yoga, arranged by the editors as follows:

I. Foundations of the Integral Yoga

II. Practice of the Integral Yoga

III. Experiences and Realisations in the Integral Yoga

IV. Transformation of Human Nature in the Integral Yoga

The letters in these volumes have been selected from the large body of letters that Sri Aurobindo wrote to disciples and others between 1927 and 1950. Other letters from this period are published in Letters on Poetry and Art and Letters on Himself and the Ashram, volumes 27 and 35 of The Complete Works Sri Aurobindo. Letters written before 1927 are reproduced in Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, volume 36 of The Complete Works.

During Sri Aurobindo's lifetime, relatively few of his letters were published. Three small books of letters on Yoga were brought out in the 1930s. A more substantial collection came out between 1947 and 1951 in a four-volume series entitled Letters of Sri Aurobindo (including one volume of letters on poetry and literature). In 1958, many more letters were included in the two large tomes of On Yoga - II. A further expanded collection in three volumes entitled Letters on Yoga was published in 1970 as part of the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. The present collection, also entitled Letters on Yoga, constitutes volumes 28-31 of The Complete Works. These volumes incorporate previously published letters and contain many new ones as well. About one-third of the letters in the present volume were not published in the Centenary Library.

The present volume is arranged by subject in three parts:

1. The Path of the Integral Yoga

2. The Synthetic Method of the Integral Yoga

3. The Integral Yoga and Others Spiritual Paths

Contents

Part One The Path of The Integral Yoga
Section One The Path and the Goal
Seeking the Divine 5-15
The Aim of the Integral Yoga 19-23
Section Two Basic Requisites of the Path
The Call and the Capacity 27-36
Qualities Needed for Sadhana 42-43
Purity 46-48
Sincerity 50-54
Aspiration 55-63
Rejection 64
Surrender 67-82
Faith 88-101
Consecration and Offering 103-104
Opening 105-106
Patience and Perseverance 110-118
Vigilance 119
Section Three The Foundation of the Sadhana
Peace - The Basis of the Sadhana 123-125
Equality - The Chief Support 129-134
Quiet and Calm 137-145
Peace 148-156
Silence 158-162
Section Four
The Divine Response
The Divine Grace and Guidance 167-175
The Divine Force 179-188
The Guru 190-200
Part Two The Synthetic Method of the Integral Yoga
Section One A Yoga of Knowledge, Works, Bhakti and Self-Perfection
The Central Processes of the Sadhana 207-215
Combining Work, Meditation and Bhakti 216-227
Section Two Sadhana through Work
Work and Yoga 231-253
Becoming Conscious in Work 254-264
The Divine Force in Work 266-274
Practical Concerns in Work 276-287
Creative Activity 290-294
Section Three Sadhana through Concentration, Meditation and Japa
Concentration and Meditation 297-319
Mantra and Japa 322-328
Section Four Sadhana through Love and Devotion
Divine Love, Psychic Love and Human Love 333-347
Bhakti, Devotion, Worship 350-365
Part Three The Integral Yoga and Other Spiritual Paths
Section One A Yoga of Transformation
Distinctive Features of the Integral Yoga 373-379
Asceticism and the Integral Yoga 380-387
A Realistic Adwaita 391-
Transformation in the Integral Yoga 398-407
Section Two Other Spiritual Paths and the Integral Yoga
The Newness of the Integral Yoga 411-416
The Veda and the Upanishads 417-425
Jainism and Buddhism 428-434
Sankhya and Yoga 437-439
The Yoga of the Bhagavad Gita 441-444
The Adwaita of Shankaracharya 447-457
Tantra 459-464
Bhakti Yoga and Vaishnavism 465-494
The Teachings of Some Modern Indian Yogis 496-500
Christianity and Theosophy 504-511
Note on The Texts 515

Vol-III

Back of The Book

Letters on Yoga-III contains letters of Sri Aurobindo on the experiences and realizations that may occur in the practice of his system of Yoga. He wrote most of these letters in the 1930s to disciples living in his Ashram in Pondicherry. The main themes are:

The place of experiences in the Integral Yoga
The movement inward, the opening of the inner senses, and the discovery of the inner being
The finding of the psychic being or soul
Widening into the cosmic consciousness
The movement upward to experience the Self, the One, and the Infinite
The movement of ascent and descent to bring about the spiritual transformation
“Letters to live within, to act always from within, from constant inner communion with the Mother. It may be difficult at first to do it always and completely, but it can be done if one sticks to it – and it is at that price, by learning to do that that one can have the siddhi in the Yoga.”

Publisher’s Note

Letters on Yoga - III comprises letters written by Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. It is the first of four volumes of Letters on Yoga, arranged by the editors as follows:

I. Foundations of the Integral Yoga

II. Practice of the Integral Yoga

III. Experiences and Realisations in the Integral Yoga

IV. Transformation of Human Nature in the Integral Yoga

The letters in these volumes have been selected from the large body of letters that Sri Aurobindo wrote to disciples and others between 1927 and 1950. Other letters from this period are published in Letters on Poetry and Art and Letters on Himself and the Ashram, volumes 27 and 35 of The Complete Works Sri Aurobindo. Letters written before 1927 are reproduced in Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, volume 36 of The Complete Works.

During Sri Aurobindo's lifetime, relatively few of his letters were published. Three small books of letters on Yoga were brought out in the 1930s. A more substantial collection came out between 1947 and 1951 in a four-volume series entitled Letters of Sri Aurobindo (including one volume of letters on poetry and literature). In 1958, many more letters were included in the two large tomes of On Yoga - II. A further expanded collection in three volumes entitled Letters on Yoga was published in 1970 as part of the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. The present collection, also entitled Letters on Yoga, constitutes volumes 28-31 of The Complete Works. These volumes incorporate previously published letters and contain many new ones as well. About one-third of the letters in the present volume were not published in the Centenary Library.

The present volume is arranged by subject in four parts:

1. The Place of Experiences in the Practice of Yoga

2. The Opening of the Inner Sense

3. Experiences of the Inner Consciousness and the Cosmic Consciousness

4. The Fundamental Realisations of the Integral Yoga

Contents

Part One The Place of Experiences In The Practice of Yoga
Section One The Nature and Value of Experiences
Experiences and Realisations 5-12
The Value of Experiences 13-14
Inner Experience and Outer Life 21-26
The Danger of the Ego and the Need of Purification 29-44
Suggestions for Dealing with Experiences 47-52
Section Two Vicissitudes on the Way to Realisation
Variations in the Intensity of Experience 57-70
Emptiness, Voidness, Blankness and Silence 72-81
Part Two The Opening of The Inner Senses
Section One Visions, Sounds, Smells and Tastes
The Value of Visions 87-97
Kinds of Vision 98-108
Subtle Sights, Sounds, Smells and Tastes 111-113
Section Two Lights and Colours
Light 117-120
Colours 122-134
Section Three Symbols
Symbols and Symbolic Visions 137-139
Sun, Moon, Star, Fire 142-147
Sky, Weather, Night and Drawn 148-149
Water and Bodies of Water 150-151
Earth 152-153
Gods, Goddesses and Semi-Divine Beings 155-159
The Human World 160-164
The Animal World 165-176
The Plant World 177-180
Constructions 181-181
Objects 183-187
Numbers and Letters 188-188
Part Three Experiences of the Inner Consciousness and the Cosmic Consciousness
Section One Experiences on the Inner Planes
Experiences on the Subtle Physical, Vital and Mental Planes 193-203
Exteriorisaton or Going Out of the Body 205-206
Section Two Experiences of the Inner Being and the Inner Consciousness
The Inward Movement 211-236
Inner Detachment and the Witness Attitude 238-246
Inner Experiences in the State of Samadhi 248-256
Three Experiences of the Inner Being 257-262
Section Three Experiences of the Cosmic Consciousness
The Universal or Cosmic Consciousness 267-279
Aspects of the Cosmic Consciousness 281-285
The Universal or Cosmic Forces 287-290
Section Four The Dangers of Inner and Cosmic Experiences
The Intermediate Zone 295-306
Inner Voices and Indications 308-309
Part Four The Fundamental Realisations of the Integral Yoga
Section One Three Stages of Transformation: Psychic, Spiritual, Supramental
The Psychic and Spiritual Realisations 319-323
Conditions of Transformation 331-333
Section Two The Psychic Opening, Emergence and Transformation
The Psychic Being and Its Role in Sadhana 337-344
The Psychic Opening 347-352
The Emergence or Coming Forward of the Psychic 354-362
Experiences Associated with the Psychic 367-378
The Psychic and Spiritual Transformations 380-387
Section Three Spiritual Experiences and Realisations
Experiences of the Self, the One and the Infinite 391-399
Experiences on the Higher Planes 401-411
Section Four The Spiritual Transformation
Ascent and Descent 415-425
Ascent to the Higher Planes 428-439
The Descent of the Higher Consciousness and Force 441-447
The Descent of the Higher Powers 449-462
Descent and Other Kinds of Experience 463-466
Feelings and Sensations in the Process of Descent 469-477
Difficulties Experienced in the Process of Descent 479-485
Descent and the Lower Nature 487-497
Note on The Texts 499

Vol-IV

Back of The Book

Letters on Yoga – IV contains letters of Sri Aurobindo on the transformation of human nature – mental, vital and physical – through the practice of Integral Yoga. It also contains letters on the difficulties encountered in practising this Yoga. Most of these letters were written by Sri Aurobindo in the 1930s to disciples living in his Ashram in Pondicherry. The main themes are:

Sadhana on the level of the mind: mental difficulties; cultivation of the mind; power of expression; speech

Sadhana on the level of the vital: the vital nature; vital temperament and vital defects; human relations and interactions

Sadhana on the physical, subconscient and inconscient levels: transformation of the physical; food, sleep, dreams and sex; illness doctors and medicines

Difficulties in the practice of Yoga: kinds of difficulty, overcoming difficulties, the opposition of the hostile Forces

“It is the lesson of life that always in this world everything fails a man – only the Divine does not fail him, if he turns entirely to the Divine. It is not because there is something bad in you that blows fall on you, - blows fall on all human beings because they are full of desire for things that cannot last and they lose them or, even if they get, it brings disappointment and cannot satisfy them. To turn to the Divine is the only truth in life.”

Publisher’s Note

Letters on Yoga - IV comprises letters written by Sri Aurobindo on the philosophical and psychological foundations of the Integral Yoga. It is the first of four volumes of Letters on Yoga, arranged by the editors as follows:

I. Foundations of the Integral Yoga

II. Practice of the Integral Yoga

III. Experiences and Realisations in the Integral Yoga

IV. Transformation of Human Nature in the Integral Yoga

The letters in these volumes have been selected from the large body of letters that Sri Aurobindo wrote to disciples and others between 1927 and 1950. Other letters from this period are published in Letters on Poetry and Art and Letters on Himself and the Ashram, volumes 27 and 35 of The Complete Works Sri Aurobindo. Letters written before 1927 are reproduced in Autobiographical Notes and Other Writings of Historical Interest, volume 36 of The Complete Works.

During Sri Aurobindo's lifetime, relatively few of his letters were published. Three small books of letters on Yoga were brought out in the 1930s. A more substantial collection came out between 1947 and 1951 in a four-volume series entitled Letters of Sri Aurobindo (including one volume of letters on poetry and literature). In 1958, many more letters were included in the two large tomes of On Yoga - II. A further expanded collection in three volumes entitled Letters on Yoga was published in 1970 as part of the Sri Aurobindo Birth Centenary Library. The present collection, also entitled Letters on Yoga, constitutes volumes 28-31 of The Complete Works. These volumes incorporate previously published letters and contain many new ones as well. About one-third of the letters in the present volume were not published in the Centenary Library.

The present volume is arranged by subject in four parts:

1. Sadhana on the Level of the Mind

2. Sadhana on the Level of the Vital

3. Sadhana on the Physical, Subconscient and Inconscient Levels

4. Difficulties in the Practice of the Integral Yoga

Contents

Part One Sadhana on the Level of the Mind
Section One The Mind and Sadhana
The Mind and Other Levels of Being 5-9
Intellect and the Intellectual 11-18
Mental Difficulties and the Need of Quietude 20-27
The Physical Mind and Sadhana 30-39
Thought and Knowledge 40-56
Section Two Cultivation of the Mind in Yoga
Mental Development and Sadhana 59-65
The Place of Study in Sadhana 69-75
The Power of Experession and Yoga 76-78
Speech and Yoga 80-94
Part Two Sadhana on the Level of the Vital
Section One The Vital Being and Sadhana
The Nature of the Vital 101-114
The Vital and Other Levels of Being 116-127
Wrong Movements of the Vital 129-148
The Lower Vital Being 150-169
Section Two Vital Temperament
Cheerfulness and Happiness 173-175
Sorrow and Suffering 177-180
Depression and Despondency 182-206
Sentimentalism, Sensitiveness, Instability, Laxity 210-214
Section Three Vital Defects
Ego and Its Forms 217-250
Desire 251-264
Anger and Violence 267-279
Fear 278
Section Four Human Relations in Yoga
Human Relations and the Spiritual Life 283-310
Interactions with Others and the Practice of Yoga 312-344
Problems in Human Relations 346-352
Part Three Sadhana on the Physical, Subconscient and Inconscient Levels
Section One Sadhana on the Level of the Physical
The Transformation of the Physical 359-367
Levels of the Physical Being 372-387
Difficulties of the Physical Nature 388-415
Section Two Food, Sleep, Dreams and Sex
Food 419-435
Sleep 437-452
Dreams 455-477
Sex 485-545
Section Three Illness, Doctors and Medicines
Illness and Health 549-575
Doctors and Medicines 578-584
Specific Illness, Ailments and Other Physical Problems 586-590
Section Four The Subconscient and the Inconscient and the Process of Yoga
The Subconscient and the Integral Yoga 595-612
The Inconscient and the Integral Yoga 617
Part Four Difficulties in the Practice of the Integral Yoga
Section One Difficulties of the Path
The Difficulties of Yoga 625-635
The Difficulties of Human Nature 638-653
Imperfections and Periods of Arrest 655-663
Resistances, Sufferings and Falls 667-674
Section Two Overcoming the Difficulties of Yoga
The Right Attitude towards Difficulties 681-694
Steps towards Overcoming Difficulties 696-699
Vigilance, Resolution, Will and the Divine Help 709-724
Time and Change of the Nature 726-732
Dealing with Despression and Despondency 734-747
Section Three The Opposition of the Hostile Forces
The Hostile Forces and the Difficulties of Yoga 757-768
Attacks by the Hostile Forces 769-780
Dealing with Hostile Attacks 782-797
Accidents, Possession, Madness 800-806
Note on The Texts 813

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