Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Language and Literature > Links in The Chain
Displaying 921 of 4536         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Links in The Chain
Links in The Chain
Description

About the Book

 

A collection of eleven incisive and insightful essays on the plight of the Indian woman written by the celebrated Hindi poet Mahadevi Varma, recipient of the Padma Bhushan and Bharatiya Jnanpith Award. Priestess of the Chhayavadi School of poetry, Mahadevi Varma was also a prose writer par excellence. Translated by Neera Kuckreja Sohoni, these essays examine the inequitable situation of the Indian woman from various perspectives and cover several parameters of the Indian woman’s status ranging from the cultural and historical to the economic, civic, educational and legal. Written in the 1930s, they continue to be relevant even in the modern context.

 

“To what extent the present essays will inspire the reader to reflect further is impossible for me to say. But if the blurred outline of the Indian woman’s frightful conditions becomes somewhat clear in the light of these essays, compiling them will not then have been in vain.” - Mahadevi Varma

 

Preface

 

In moments of introspection, I have always liked to write prose because it provides enough space to analyze not only my own sensibility but also the external conditions. My first sociological essay was written when I was a student in the seventh grade. Thus, my acquaintance with life’s reality is nothing new.

 

The present collection carries some of those essays in which I have tried to view the inequitable situation of the Indian woman from various perspectives. I am by nature intolerant of injustice. It is therefore natural that these essays should reek of radicalism. But I have never believed in destruction for the sake of destruction. On the contrary, I am dedicated to those bright sources of constructive creativity in whose shining presence any distortion disappears like darkness. Until natural form manifests itself, to engage one’s energies in destroying what is unnatural is like attempting to turn darkness into light by repeatedly washing it with milk. In fact darkness itself is nothing other than absence of light. That is why even the tiniest of lamps is able to destroy its density.

 

The day the Indian woman awakens with the full force of her being, it will not be possible for anyone to stop her from marching forward. As regard to her rights, the fact is that they have not been nor ever will be secured through begging simply because they are not objects of exchange. An individual’s rights are determined by the contribution made by that individual to society and its development. Our rights too will be dependent on our strength and wisdom. This statement may not sound very practical but its empirical use will prove its undoubted veracity. Many a times, without paying attention to changing the woman’s external circumstances I have succeeded in bringing about an equilibrium to her situation by simply rousing her inner strengths. The solution to a problem lies in the knowledge of that problem. And that knowledge expects a seeker. It follows therefore that one desirous of attaining rights should also possess them. Generally it is this particular characteristic that will be found lacking in the Indian woman. At times one detects common piteousness in her and at others uncommon rebelliousness, but equilibrium is unknown to her life.

 

To what extent the present essays will inspire the reader to reflect further is impossible for me to say. But if the blurred outline of the Indian woman’s frightful conditions becomes somewhat clear in the light of these essays, compiling them will not then have been in vain.

 

Contents

 

Translator’s Preface

ix

Author’s Preface

xv

Links in Our Chain

3

War and Woman

23

The Curse of Womanhood

29

The Modern Woman

37

Home and Beyond

49

The Hindu Woman’s Wifehood

69

The Trafficking of Life

80

The Issue of Woman’s Economic Independence

93

Our Problems

104

Society and the Individual

122

The Art of Living

137

Mahadevi Varma: A Chronology

145

Works by Mahadevi Varma

148

Selected Reading

149

Biographical Note

150

 

Sample Pages









Links in The Chain

Item Code:
NAI345
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2004
Publisher:
ISBN:
9788187649342
Language:
English
Size:
8 inch X 5 inch
Pages:
170
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 235 gms
Price:
$15.00   Shipping Free
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Links in The Chain

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 3543 times since 31st Jul, 2016

About the Book

 

A collection of eleven incisive and insightful essays on the plight of the Indian woman written by the celebrated Hindi poet Mahadevi Varma, recipient of the Padma Bhushan and Bharatiya Jnanpith Award. Priestess of the Chhayavadi School of poetry, Mahadevi Varma was also a prose writer par excellence. Translated by Neera Kuckreja Sohoni, these essays examine the inequitable situation of the Indian woman from various perspectives and cover several parameters of the Indian woman’s status ranging from the cultural and historical to the economic, civic, educational and legal. Written in the 1930s, they continue to be relevant even in the modern context.

 

“To what extent the present essays will inspire the reader to reflect further is impossible for me to say. But if the blurred outline of the Indian woman’s frightful conditions becomes somewhat clear in the light of these essays, compiling them will not then have been in vain.” - Mahadevi Varma

 

Preface

 

In moments of introspection, I have always liked to write prose because it provides enough space to analyze not only my own sensibility but also the external conditions. My first sociological essay was written when I was a student in the seventh grade. Thus, my acquaintance with life’s reality is nothing new.

 

The present collection carries some of those essays in which I have tried to view the inequitable situation of the Indian woman from various perspectives. I am by nature intolerant of injustice. It is therefore natural that these essays should reek of radicalism. But I have never believed in destruction for the sake of destruction. On the contrary, I am dedicated to those bright sources of constructive creativity in whose shining presence any distortion disappears like darkness. Until natural form manifests itself, to engage one’s energies in destroying what is unnatural is like attempting to turn darkness into light by repeatedly washing it with milk. In fact darkness itself is nothing other than absence of light. That is why even the tiniest of lamps is able to destroy its density.

 

The day the Indian woman awakens with the full force of her being, it will not be possible for anyone to stop her from marching forward. As regard to her rights, the fact is that they have not been nor ever will be secured through begging simply because they are not objects of exchange. An individual’s rights are determined by the contribution made by that individual to society and its development. Our rights too will be dependent on our strength and wisdom. This statement may not sound very practical but its empirical use will prove its undoubted veracity. Many a times, without paying attention to changing the woman’s external circumstances I have succeeded in bringing about an equilibrium to her situation by simply rousing her inner strengths. The solution to a problem lies in the knowledge of that problem. And that knowledge expects a seeker. It follows therefore that one desirous of attaining rights should also possess them. Generally it is this particular characteristic that will be found lacking in the Indian woman. At times one detects common piteousness in her and at others uncommon rebelliousness, but equilibrium is unknown to her life.

 

To what extent the present essays will inspire the reader to reflect further is impossible for me to say. But if the blurred outline of the Indian woman’s frightful conditions becomes somewhat clear in the light of these essays, compiling them will not then have been in vain.

 

Contents

 

Translator’s Preface

ix

Author’s Preface

xv

Links in Our Chain

3

War and Woman

23

The Curse of Womanhood

29

The Modern Woman

37

Home and Beyond

49

The Hindu Woman’s Wifehood

69

The Trafficking of Life

80

The Issue of Woman’s Economic Independence

93

Our Problems

104

Society and the Individual

122

The Art of Living

137

Mahadevi Varma: A Chronology

145

Works by Mahadevi Varma

148

Selected Reading

149

Biographical Note

150

 

Sample Pages









Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Based on your browsing history

Loading... Please wait

Related Items

यामा: Yama
Item Code: NZA940
$8.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
सन्धिनी: Sandhini
Item Code: NZA936
$10.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
नीरजा: Neerja
Item Code: NZA927
$8.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
दीपशिखा: Deepshikha
Item Code: NZA924
$10.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

I received my black Katappa Stone Shiva Lingam today and am extremely satisfied with my purchase. I would not hesitate to refer friends to your business or order again. Thank you and God Bless.
Marc, UK
The altar arrived today. Really beautiful. Thank you
Morris, Texas.
Very Great Indian shopping website!!!
Edem, Sweden
I have just received the Phiran I ordered last week. Very beautiful indeed! Thank you.
Gonzalo, Spain
I am very satisfied with my order, received it quickly and it looks OK so far. I would order from you again.
Arun, USA
We received the order and extremely happy with the purchase and would recommend to friends also.
Chandana, USA
The statue arrived today fully intact. It is beautiful.
Morris, Texas.
Thank you Exotic India team, I love your website and the quick turn around with helping me with my purchase. It was absolutely a pleasure this time and look forward to do business with you.
Pushkala, USA.
Very grateful for this service, of making this precious treasure of Haveli Sangeet for ThakurJi so easily in the US. Appreciate the fact that notation is provided.
Leena, USA.
The Bhairava painting I ordered by Sri Kailash Raj is excellent. I have been purchasing from Exotic India for well over a decade and am always beyond delighted with my extraordinary purchases and customer service. Thank you.
Marc, UK
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India