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Books > Language and Literature > Second Book of Sanskrit: A Treatise on Grammar with Exercises
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Second Book of Sanskrit: A Treatise on Grammar with Exercises
Second Book of Sanskrit: A Treatise on Grammar with Exercises
Description
Preface

This Second Book of Sanskrit has been prepared under instructions from Sir A. Grant, Director of Public Instruction. Its plan is nearly the same as that of the First Book, which the student is supposed to have read and mastered. Each lesson consists of four parts: - 1st Grammar: 2nd Sanskrit sentences for translation into English: 3rd English sentences for translation into Sanskrit – both intended to exercise the student in the rules of Grammar given at the top of the Lesson; and 4th a vocabulary.

This and First Book together contains as much Grammar as is needed for all practical purposes, perhaps more. I have adopted the terminology of the English terminology of the English Grammarians of Sanskrit but have strictly followed Panini, as explained by bhattoji Diksita in his siddhantakaumudi. Most of the rules are mere translations of the sutras. Besides the terms, guna, Vrddhi, and a few other, which have been adopted from Native Grammarians by nearly all European writers on the subject, I have found it necessary to appropriate two more viz, Set and anit. The prejudice against mere Native terms, in deference to which professor benfey seems in his smaller Grammar to have discarded even the words guna and Vrddhi, without substituting any other, is, in my humble opinion, very unreasonable, when it is difficult to frame new words to designate the things which they signify. It is very inconvenient to have to describe the same thing again and again whenever on has occasion to speak of its. It will at the same time be somewhat difficult for the learner to make out, when a thing is so described in a variety of cases, that it is the same. Words adapted to express a particular meaning are as necessary here as in other affairs of human life. What are amount of inconvenience would it, for instance entail, if whenever we had to speak of the human race, we were instead of being allowed to use the world man must not elevate an ordinary truism to the rank of a newly discovered truth.

The general rules of grammar, and such exceptions as are important, have been given in this book, those of the least render a book liable to the charge of inaccuracy. But it is unavoidable in an elementary work, and after all it will produce little or no practical inconvenience.

There is one point in Sanskrit Grammar, in my explanation of which I have departed from ordinary usage, though I think I do agree with Panini and his commentators. It is the sense to be attached to the so-called Aorist.

CONTENT

 

  Preface v
Lesson I Irregularities belonging to the 1st, 4th, 6th and 10th Conjugations 1
Lesson II Fifth and eighth Conjugations Present Tense 13
Lesson III Imperfect Tense 20
Lesson IV Imperative and Potential 24
Lesson V Ninth Conjugation- Present and Imperative 29
Lesson VI Imperfect and Potential 36
Lesson VII Second Conjugation- Present and Imperative 39
Lesson VIII Imperfect and Potential 50
Lesson IX Second Conjugation (continued) Present and Imperative 56
Lesson X Imperfect and Potential 67
Lesson XI Third Conjugation 71
Lesson XII Seventh Conjugation 81
Lesson XIII Perfect 88
Lesson XIV Perfect (continued) 99
Lesson XV Part-I First and Second Futures and Conditional 110
  Part II- Passive Forms 117
Lesson XVI Declensional Irregularities 121
Lesson XVII Numerals 138
Lesson XVIII Comparative and Superlative Degrees of Adjective 147
Lesson XIX Compounds- Dvandva and Tatpurusa 155
Lesson XX Bahuvrihi and Avyayibhava 164
Lesson XXI Causals 172
Lesson XXII Aorist- First, Second and Third Varities 178
Lesson XXIII Sixth and seventh Varities 189
Lesson XXIV Part I- Fourth and Fifth Varities 194
  Part II- Benedictive Mood 206
Lesson XXV Desideratives 208
Lesson XXVI Verbal Derivatives- Past, Perfect, Future and Potential Participles 215
  Glossary, Sanskrit into English 237
  Glossary, English into Sanskrit 246

 

Sample Pages

Second Book of Sanskrit: A Treatise on Grammar with Exercises

Item Code:
IDF928
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2007
ISBN:
9788170800498
Language:
English
Size:
7.0" X 4.7"
Pages:
218
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 265 gms
Price:
$15.00   Shipping Free
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Preface

This Second Book of Sanskrit has been prepared under instructions from Sir A. Grant, Director of Public Instruction. Its plan is nearly the same as that of the First Book, which the student is supposed to have read and mastered. Each lesson consists of four parts: - 1st Grammar: 2nd Sanskrit sentences for translation into English: 3rd English sentences for translation into Sanskrit – both intended to exercise the student in the rules of Grammar given at the top of the Lesson; and 4th a vocabulary.

This and First Book together contains as much Grammar as is needed for all practical purposes, perhaps more. I have adopted the terminology of the English terminology of the English Grammarians of Sanskrit but have strictly followed Panini, as explained by bhattoji Diksita in his siddhantakaumudi. Most of the rules are mere translations of the sutras. Besides the terms, guna, Vrddhi, and a few other, which have been adopted from Native Grammarians by nearly all European writers on the subject, I have found it necessary to appropriate two more viz, Set and anit. The prejudice against mere Native terms, in deference to which professor benfey seems in his smaller Grammar to have discarded even the words guna and Vrddhi, without substituting any other, is, in my humble opinion, very unreasonable, when it is difficult to frame new words to designate the things which they signify. It is very inconvenient to have to describe the same thing again and again whenever on has occasion to speak of its. It will at the same time be somewhat difficult for the learner to make out, when a thing is so described in a variety of cases, that it is the same. Words adapted to express a particular meaning are as necessary here as in other affairs of human life. What are amount of inconvenience would it, for instance entail, if whenever we had to speak of the human race, we were instead of being allowed to use the world man must not elevate an ordinary truism to the rank of a newly discovered truth.

The general rules of grammar, and such exceptions as are important, have been given in this book, those of the least render a book liable to the charge of inaccuracy. But it is unavoidable in an elementary work, and after all it will produce little or no practical inconvenience.

There is one point in Sanskrit Grammar, in my explanation of which I have departed from ordinary usage, though I think I do agree with Panini and his commentators. It is the sense to be attached to the so-called Aorist.

CONTENT

 

  Preface v
Lesson I Irregularities belonging to the 1st, 4th, 6th and 10th Conjugations 1
Lesson II Fifth and eighth Conjugations Present Tense 13
Lesson III Imperfect Tense 20
Lesson IV Imperative and Potential 24
Lesson V Ninth Conjugation- Present and Imperative 29
Lesson VI Imperfect and Potential 36
Lesson VII Second Conjugation- Present and Imperative 39
Lesson VIII Imperfect and Potential 50
Lesson IX Second Conjugation (continued) Present and Imperative 56
Lesson X Imperfect and Potential 67
Lesson XI Third Conjugation 71
Lesson XII Seventh Conjugation 81
Lesson XIII Perfect 88
Lesson XIV Perfect (continued) 99
Lesson XV Part-I First and Second Futures and Conditional 110
  Part II- Passive Forms 117
Lesson XVI Declensional Irregularities 121
Lesson XVII Numerals 138
Lesson XVIII Comparative and Superlative Degrees of Adjective 147
Lesson XIX Compounds- Dvandva and Tatpurusa 155
Lesson XX Bahuvrihi and Avyayibhava 164
Lesson XXI Causals 172
Lesson XXII Aorist- First, Second and Third Varities 178
Lesson XXIII Sixth and seventh Varities 189
Lesson XXIV Part I- Fourth and Fifth Varities 194
  Part II- Benedictive Mood 206
Lesson XXV Desideratives 208
Lesson XXVI Verbal Derivatives- Past, Perfect, Future and Potential Participles 215
  Glossary, Sanskrit into English 237
  Glossary, English into Sanskrit 246

 

Sample Pages

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  • Will this book help me with my pronunciation of the Sanskirt language? If not is there a better book? Or are there a series of books that would help?
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