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Books > Buddhist > Visuddhimagga of Buddhaghosacariya (An Old and Rare Book)
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Visuddhimagga of Buddhaghosacariya (An Old and Rare Book)
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Preface

This edition of the Visuddhimagga is based chiefly upon manuscripts, described by Professor C. R. Lanman as follows:

B1 is an excellent MS. From the library of the late King Thebaw of Burma at Mandalay and is described in the Journal of the Pali Text Society for 1896, page 40, under numbers 128 and 129. It is now a part of the India Office Library in London and was lent to Mr. Warren by the kindness of H. M's Secretary of State for India in council. [In Burmese characters.].

B2 is a MS. Procured by the late Henry Rigg, Esq., consulting engineer to the Government of India for railways. The leaves are about 19 inches wide and 2½ inches from top to bottom, and are between boards finished in red lacquer. [In Burmese characters.]

C1 is from the private collection of the late Professor T. W. Rhys-Davids, founder of the Pali Text Society. It was bought by him at Colombo in 1887. The leaves are about 17½ " * 2½". [In Singhalese characters.]

C2 belonged to the late Reverend Dr. Richard Morris, formerly the President of the English Philological Society. The leaves are 21½" * 2½". [In Singhalese characters.]

Mr. Warren had these manuscripts typed in parallel lines, Roman characters, and in the order given above. The work fills fourteen folios. Moreover, he had prepared a typed manuscript of the whole book. Of this the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth chapters are in print. It seems that he intended to follow B1, giving all the variants of the other three.

The Harvard University Library possesses two other Singhalese manuscripts, the first from the late Venerable Waskaduwa Subhuti of Kalutara, Ceylon; the second procured for the late Dr. Paul Carus by the Anagarika H. Dharmapala. These two manuscripts, designated as C3 and C4, along with two Burmese and one Singhalese printed editions of the Visuddhimaga, were collated with Mr. Warren's typed copies by Mr. Edwin W. Friend, under the direction of Professor Lanman.

The present edition, however, has not followed Mr. Friend's collation. For the intention is to change Mr. Warren's work as little as possible, and his manuscripts contain all the good readings. In just one case [Chap. XVII. 170] I have adopted a different reading, from the new Siamese (printed) edition of the Visuddhimagga. In some places all of Mr. Warren's authorities needed correction on the authority of the Tika. With these exceptions, Mr. Warren's four manuscripts have been followed, but his original plan of printing B1 with all the variants has not been followed. For, in many places, even the B1 reading is faulty. Such mistakes are not recorded, being obviously clerical errors or mistakes of pronunciation. In the Burmese script, ha becomes ma by the addition of a stroke; for tha, dha is often written, e. g. gantha "book" as gandha "perfume"; gutha as gudha. In the Singhalese, n and n are frequently interchanged: vana "forest" and vana "wound"; gahana "accepting" and gahana "jungle." It would be superfluous to give such readings or variants. The inclusion and criticism of these would add to the bulk, but not to the value of the volume. Therefore the reading that makes the best sense, and only those variants that give possible meanings, have been retained. Certain common words are always differently spelt in the Burmese and Singhalese versions. Such words are given in a list at the end of the book.

Mr. Wareen's paragraphs I found either too large or too small. I have recast and numbered them to facilitate references and comparison with the translation. Some of these paragraphs are sub-sections of long stories [I. 117-121], or of long quotations [I. 144-150]. Though the Burmese punctuation marks are the same for paragraph, period, or semicolon, they have helped me more than the Singhalese, which have very little punctualtion. The quotations from the text of the Pitakas and from the other Pali texts are put in inverted commas, and the references in the square brackets immediately following are to the book volume, and page of the Pali Text Society edition, or of the other editions as described in the list of abbreviations. The Suttanipata, Dhammapada and the Theragatha are referred to by the numbers of the stanzas. This book, the Visuddhimagga, is referred to without a preceding letter, the Roman numeral being the chapter, the Arabic the paragraph. Unfilled brackets indicate that the quotations are not yet traced, most of these being from the old Singhalese atthakathas, now lost. The words upon which Buddhaghosa comments are italicized; so also the colophons to the chapters, and the headings of the pages. The omission of such indeclinable as pi, ti, eva, and ca when recorded in the footnotes, also removes the changes in the preceding consonants or vowels. For example, the Singhalese readings in I. 138, III. 43, III. 114 and XI. 9 are respectively, ahararj, upacchijjati, parig-gahavasena and kevalarj.

In the Burmese and sometimes in the Singhalese MSS., these is a punctualtion sign before such sentences as "Cetiyapabbatavasi Maha-Tissatthero viya" [I. 55]. Modern editors connect these with the preceding sentences. But from two examples in the Papancasudani [M. Atth. I. 258], i. e. "Kalavallimandapavasi-Maha-Nagatthero viya ca," and "Galambatitthavihara vassupagata pannasa bhikkhu viya," I came to the conclusion that such sentences were not only separate, but often began a new paragraph.

Foreword

My brother Henry, Henry, born in 1854, fell out of a carriage when he was a mere child, and, in consequence, grew up much deformed, conspicuously humpbacked. Digestive trouble naturally followed, and he was never quite well; but he must have had originally a strong constitution, and was certainly careful of his health. I have heard of no special illness, save scarlet fever which left him partially deaf.

He went to Harvard College, lived in the northwestern corner of Beck Hall on the ground floor, and was graduated in 1879. His bodily disabilities were such that he could not join in the social life, nor make many friends. After graduation he went to the Johns Hopkins University to study Sanskrit under Professor Lanman.

Then he came home to 67 Mount Vernon Street, where he had a little room facing south and so heated with a fire that I used to call it Tophet. Outside this room there was a small table, on while were placed tow cold chops or some other refreshment, because he sometimes needed food in the night. He had a big desk, at which he worked standing. He slept on its top in a bag, with coverings. To put himself in bed was a circumstantial process.

He had chosen Buddhist studies (so he told me) because he disapproved of the modern Buddhism preached in Boston; he desired to show that it was not the genuine thing; but I never observed any tendency to believe in the genuine thing. "The heathen in his blindness" interested him as contradiction of the blind tradition of New England. His impulse, indeed, was skeptical reaction.

He disapproved of the objects for which some of our family lived. I agreed with him in part and protested. He would not protest: "We can do nothing; it is a storm; we must let it pass over." The "storm," if I remember, was expenditure on household ornaments, on decoration, and on pictures. He had no interest in art: I objected on other grounds. There was also a remark of his: "So-and-so's ambition seems to be only to enlarge his style of living." In short, though with us in the house, he had withdrawn into his little room and into his own life, which indeed needed all kinds of protection, if, with his handicap, he was to accomplish anything. He felt himself, however, still not independent enough. At one time he established himself at Cedar Hill, Waltham, the country house where we had spent our summers, but which we had now abandoned. There he lived with one servant and his big desk. I used to see strange dishes of herbs, gathered on the place. For climate he passed a winter at Coronado Beach in California.

Afterward, he bought the house on the corner of Quincy and Harvard Streets in Cambridge, which had belonged to Professor Charles Beck, the editor of Petronius. Here he lived till his death, and had again the advantage of intercourse with Professor Lanman. He had turned from Sanskrit to the study of Pali. I will not describe an invention of his, a little cabin set up in a bedroom and specially heated, which was intended to keep an even temperature sufficiently high to enable him to avoid the weight of bed-clothes. It was eventually abandoned on medical advice. I mention it only as one of his dogged efforts to render his life and work possible.

Though not emotional, he must have felt always that he was battling alone against odds. He showed no sign of loneliness save that he welcomed visits: I could make them rarely, living mostly abroad. There seemed a certain pathos in his request that I should select for him a soap dish. It was, I thought, an appeal for attention, rather than for the soap dish. His mental isolation was so complete that he could not enter into the purposes of others; he could show himself parsimonious, but the result was a benefaction. He bequeathed money and his house and land to Harvard College; the house was moved back, and the Union was built where it had stood.

When he new that he was to die in a few days, he did not change at all. He regretted that he must abandon his intention of supplementing his work on the Visuddhimagga by collection of parallel passages; but he spent his time, when members of the family came to see him, in telling them funny stories. His attendant was not suffered to stay on the floor where he slept. Henry rose in the night, went into a neighboring room, sank on the floor, and died, 1899.

There must have been much patience and will-power in his accomplishment.

I have been anxious that his work, of which I did not know the merit, should be published, and am heartily glad that it now appears.

 

EDWARD PERRY WARREN

Note-A careful memorial of my brother, with full particulars of his life, was written by Professor Lanman and is to be found at the end of Doctor Burlingame's Buddhist Legends. it is reprinted at the end of the seventh and eighth issues of my brother's Buddhism in Translations.

About the Book:

Visuddhimagga or "The Path to Complete Purification" is a great work, " a mine of historic interest" in the words of Mrs Rhys-Davids, by the well-known fourth century stalwart Buddhaghosa who has in this work faithfully preserved ancient Buddhist traditions and who "enjoys a well-merited reputation among the Buddhist of Ceylon, Burma and Saim".

The present edition of the Visuddhimagga is based chiefly on four manuscripts belonging respectively to the library of King Thebaut of Burma, Henry Rigg, Prof. T.W. Rhys-Davids and Reverend Dr. Richard Morris. It is almost wholly the work of Henry Clarke Warren with a small exception, viz. that in just one case (Chap. XVII 170) a different reading from the new Siamese printed edition has been adopted.
 

Contents
Prefacevii
Forewordxvii
Abbreviationxx
CHAPTER
ISilaniddeso3
IIDhutanganiddeso48
IIIKammatthanagahananiddeso68
IVPathavikasinaniddeso96
VSesakasinaniddeso138
VIAsubhakammattananiddeso145
VIICha-anussatiniddeso162
VIIIAnussatikammatthananiddeso189
IXBrahmaviharaniddeso244
XAruppaniddeso271
XISamadhiniddeso285
XIIIddhividhaniddeso314
XIIIAbhinnaniddeso343
XIVKhandhaniddeso369
XVAyatanadhatuniddeso408
XVIIndriyasaccaniddeso417
XVIIPannabhuminiddeso440
XVIIIDitthivisuddhiniddeso503
XIXKankhavitaranavisuddhiniddeso513
XXMaggamaggananadassanavisuddhiniddeso520
XXIPatipadananadassanavisuddhiniddeso549
XXIINanadassanavisuddhiniddeso577
XXIIIPannabhavananisansaniddeso601
Words Differently Spelled615
Addenda617
Sample Pages


 

Visuddhimagga of Buddhaghosacariya (An Old and Rare Book)

Item Code:
IDC336
Cover:
HardCover
Edition:
1999
ISBN:
81-208-0653-0
Language:
English
Size:
10" X 6.75"
Pages:
631
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 102 gms
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$50.00   Shipping Free - 4 to 6 days
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Preface

This edition of the Visuddhimagga is based chiefly upon manuscripts, described by Professor C. R. Lanman as follows:

B1 is an excellent MS. From the library of the late King Thebaw of Burma at Mandalay and is described in the Journal of the Pali Text Society for 1896, page 40, under numbers 128 and 129. It is now a part of the India Office Library in London and was lent to Mr. Warren by the kindness of H. M's Secretary of State for India in council. [In Burmese characters.].

B2 is a MS. Procured by the late Henry Rigg, Esq., consulting engineer to the Government of India for railways. The leaves are about 19 inches wide and 2½ inches from top to bottom, and are between boards finished in red lacquer. [In Burmese characters.]

C1 is from the private collection of the late Professor T. W. Rhys-Davids, founder of the Pali Text Society. It was bought by him at Colombo in 1887. The leaves are about 17½ " * 2½". [In Singhalese characters.]

C2 belonged to the late Reverend Dr. Richard Morris, formerly the President of the English Philological Society. The leaves are 21½" * 2½". [In Singhalese characters.]

Mr. Warren had these manuscripts typed in parallel lines, Roman characters, and in the order given above. The work fills fourteen folios. Moreover, he had prepared a typed manuscript of the whole book. Of this the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth chapters are in print. It seems that he intended to follow B1, giving all the variants of the other three.

The Harvard University Library possesses two other Singhalese manuscripts, the first from the late Venerable Waskaduwa Subhuti of Kalutara, Ceylon; the second procured for the late Dr. Paul Carus by the Anagarika H. Dharmapala. These two manuscripts, designated as C3 and C4, along with two Burmese and one Singhalese printed editions of the Visuddhimaga, were collated with Mr. Warren's typed copies by Mr. Edwin W. Friend, under the direction of Professor Lanman.

The present edition, however, has not followed Mr. Friend's collation. For the intention is to change Mr. Warren's work as little as possible, and his manuscripts contain all the good readings. In just one case [Chap. XVII. 170] I have adopted a different reading, from the new Siamese (printed) edition of the Visuddhimagga. In some places all of Mr. Warren's authorities needed correction on the authority of the Tika. With these exceptions, Mr. Warren's four manuscripts have been followed, but his original plan of printing B1 with all the variants has not been followed. For, in many places, even the B1 reading is faulty. Such mistakes are not recorded, being obviously clerical errors or mistakes of pronunciation. In the Burmese script, ha becomes ma by the addition of a stroke; for tha, dha is often written, e. g. gantha "book" as gandha "perfume"; gutha as gudha. In the Singhalese, n and n are frequently interchanged: vana "forest" and vana "wound"; gahana "accepting" and gahana "jungle." It would be superfluous to give such readings or variants. The inclusion and criticism of these would add to the bulk, but not to the value of the volume. Therefore the reading that makes the best sense, and only those variants that give possible meanings, have been retained. Certain common words are always differently spelt in the Burmese and Singhalese versions. Such words are given in a list at the end of the book.

Mr. Wareen's paragraphs I found either too large or too small. I have recast and numbered them to facilitate references and comparison with the translation. Some of these paragraphs are sub-sections of long stories [I. 117-121], or of long quotations [I. 144-150]. Though the Burmese punctuation marks are the same for paragraph, period, or semicolon, they have helped me more than the Singhalese, which have very little punctualtion. The quotations from the text of the Pitakas and from the other Pali texts are put in inverted commas, and the references in the square brackets immediately following are to the book volume, and page of the Pali Text Society edition, or of the other editions as described in the list of abbreviations. The Suttanipata, Dhammapada and the Theragatha are referred to by the numbers of the stanzas. This book, the Visuddhimagga, is referred to without a preceding letter, the Roman numeral being the chapter, the Arabic the paragraph. Unfilled brackets indicate that the quotations are not yet traced, most of these being from the old Singhalese atthakathas, now lost. The words upon which Buddhaghosa comments are italicized; so also the colophons to the chapters, and the headings of the pages. The omission of such indeclinable as pi, ti, eva, and ca when recorded in the footnotes, also removes the changes in the preceding consonants or vowels. For example, the Singhalese readings in I. 138, III. 43, III. 114 and XI. 9 are respectively, ahararj, upacchijjati, parig-gahavasena and kevalarj.

In the Burmese and sometimes in the Singhalese MSS., these is a punctualtion sign before such sentences as "Cetiyapabbatavasi Maha-Tissatthero viya" [I. 55]. Modern editors connect these with the preceding sentences. But from two examples in the Papancasudani [M. Atth. I. 258], i. e. "Kalavallimandapavasi-Maha-Nagatthero viya ca," and "Galambatitthavihara vassupagata pannasa bhikkhu viya," I came to the conclusion that such sentences were not only separate, but often began a new paragraph.

Foreword

My brother Henry, Henry, born in 1854, fell out of a carriage when he was a mere child, and, in consequence, grew up much deformed, conspicuously humpbacked. Digestive trouble naturally followed, and he was never quite well; but he must have had originally a strong constitution, and was certainly careful of his health. I have heard of no special illness, save scarlet fever which left him partially deaf.

He went to Harvard College, lived in the northwestern corner of Beck Hall on the ground floor, and was graduated in 1879. His bodily disabilities were such that he could not join in the social life, nor make many friends. After graduation he went to the Johns Hopkins University to study Sanskrit under Professor Lanman.

Then he came home to 67 Mount Vernon Street, where he had a little room facing south and so heated with a fire that I used to call it Tophet. Outside this room there was a small table, on while were placed tow cold chops or some other refreshment, because he sometimes needed food in the night. He had a big desk, at which he worked standing. He slept on its top in a bag, with coverings. To put himself in bed was a circumstantial process.

He had chosen Buddhist studies (so he told me) because he disapproved of the modern Buddhism preached in Boston; he desired to show that it was not the genuine thing; but I never observed any tendency to believe in the genuine thing. "The heathen in his blindness" interested him as contradiction of the blind tradition of New England. His impulse, indeed, was skeptical reaction.

He disapproved of the objects for which some of our family lived. I agreed with him in part and protested. He would not protest: "We can do nothing; it is a storm; we must let it pass over." The "storm," if I remember, was expenditure on household ornaments, on decoration, and on pictures. He had no interest in art: I objected on other grounds. There was also a remark of his: "So-and-so's ambition seems to be only to enlarge his style of living." In short, though with us in the house, he had withdrawn into his little room and into his own life, which indeed needed all kinds of protection, if, with his handicap, he was to accomplish anything. He felt himself, however, still not independent enough. At one time he established himself at Cedar Hill, Waltham, the country house where we had spent our summers, but which we had now abandoned. There he lived with one servant and his big desk. I used to see strange dishes of herbs, gathered on the place. For climate he passed a winter at Coronado Beach in California.

Afterward, he bought the house on the corner of Quincy and Harvard Streets in Cambridge, which had belonged to Professor Charles Beck, the editor of Petronius. Here he lived till his death, and had again the advantage of intercourse with Professor Lanman. He had turned from Sanskrit to the study of Pali. I will not describe an invention of his, a little cabin set up in a bedroom and specially heated, which was intended to keep an even temperature sufficiently high to enable him to avoid the weight of bed-clothes. It was eventually abandoned on medical advice. I mention it only as one of his dogged efforts to render his life and work possible.

Though not emotional, he must have felt always that he was battling alone against odds. He showed no sign of loneliness save that he welcomed visits: I could make them rarely, living mostly abroad. There seemed a certain pathos in his request that I should select for him a soap dish. It was, I thought, an appeal for attention, rather than for the soap dish. His mental isolation was so complete that he could not enter into the purposes of others; he could show himself parsimonious, but the result was a benefaction. He bequeathed money and his house and land to Harvard College; the house was moved back, and the Union was built where it had stood.

When he new that he was to die in a few days, he did not change at all. He regretted that he must abandon his intention of supplementing his work on the Visuddhimagga by collection of parallel passages; but he spent his time, when members of the family came to see him, in telling them funny stories. His attendant was not suffered to stay on the floor where he slept. Henry rose in the night, went into a neighboring room, sank on the floor, and died, 1899.

There must have been much patience and will-power in his accomplishment.

I have been anxious that his work, of which I did not know the merit, should be published, and am heartily glad that it now appears.

 

EDWARD PERRY WARREN

Note-A careful memorial of my brother, with full particulars of his life, was written by Professor Lanman and is to be found at the end of Doctor Burlingame's Buddhist Legends. it is reprinted at the end of the seventh and eighth issues of my brother's Buddhism in Translations.

About the Book:

Visuddhimagga or "The Path to Complete Purification" is a great work, " a mine of historic interest" in the words of Mrs Rhys-Davids, by the well-known fourth century stalwart Buddhaghosa who has in this work faithfully preserved ancient Buddhist traditions and who "enjoys a well-merited reputation among the Buddhist of Ceylon, Burma and Saim".

The present edition of the Visuddhimagga is based chiefly on four manuscripts belonging respectively to the library of King Thebaut of Burma, Henry Rigg, Prof. T.W. Rhys-Davids and Reverend Dr. Richard Morris. It is almost wholly the work of Henry Clarke Warren with a small exception, viz. that in just one case (Chap. XVII 170) a different reading from the new Siamese printed edition has been adopted.
 

Contents
Prefacevii
Forewordxvii
Abbreviationxx
CHAPTER
ISilaniddeso3
IIDhutanganiddeso48
IIIKammatthanagahananiddeso68
IVPathavikasinaniddeso96
VSesakasinaniddeso138
VIAsubhakammattananiddeso145
VIICha-anussatiniddeso162
VIIIAnussatikammatthananiddeso189
IXBrahmaviharaniddeso244
XAruppaniddeso271
XISamadhiniddeso285
XIIIddhividhaniddeso314
XIIIAbhinnaniddeso343
XIVKhandhaniddeso369
XVAyatanadhatuniddeso408
XVIIndriyasaccaniddeso417
XVIIPannabhuminiddeso440
XVIIIDitthivisuddhiniddeso503
XIXKankhavitaranavisuddhiniddeso513
XXMaggamaggananadassanavisuddhiniddeso520
XXIPatipadananadassanavisuddhiniddeso549
XXIINanadassanavisuddhiniddeso577
XXIIIPannabhavananisansaniddeso601
Words Differently Spelled615
Addenda617
Sample Pages


 

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