Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Hindu > Ways and Reasons for Thinking About The Mahabharata as a Whole
Displaying 2399 of 7299         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Ways and Reasons for Thinking About The Mahabharata as a Whole
Pages from the book
Ways and Reasons for Thinking About The Mahabharata as a Whole
Look Inside the Book
Description
Introduction

The completion of the Critical Edition of the Mahabharata 1 in 1966 constitutes a significant event in this epic's history. A long and venerable tradition of textual criticism assisted V. S. sukthankar in forging this edition-thus, at the very outset of this essay this scientific method is to be congratulated.' The significance of sukthankar's achievement is best illustrated in the following anecdote related to me by Prof. Dhadphale during the 14th World Sanskrit Conference:

Towards the end of his life Sukthankar increasingly had doubts about the sovereignty of the text-historical approach.' He began to wonder about the meaning of the text itself," When D. D. Kosambi came to visit Sukthankar on his death-bed, it was quite a sad moment. Kosambi wanted to cheer him up, so he said, "Sukthankar, all your life you have sought to reconstruct the oldest possible version of the Mahabharata, but what would you have to say if tomorrow it were announced that an even older manuscript has been discovered, older than any of the manuscripts you have seen?" Kosambi probably thought sukthankar would express regret. sukthankar, however, was quite a serious fellow. He didn't understand that Kosambi was teasing him, so he replied, "how old, Damodar?" Kosambi was surprised, but continued, "Let us say, century or so, definitely pre- Gupta." At this, Sukthankar looked straight at Kosambi and said, "Damodar, if such a manuscript were to be discovered tomorrow, I can tell you that it will correspond exactly to my manuscript excepting a few padas, and even those padas will be the ones under which I have drawn a wavy line."

This anecdote underlines something that is often forgotten in Mahabharata studies: that the critical method has fulfilled its promise and created a workable text-a text ready for a brave new world of interpreting the epic. This is the basic premise of the papers in this volume." Once textual criticism has fulfilled its promise and created not just a workable text, but a comprehensive text that encompasses all the major manuscript traditions, we stand before the challenge of understanding this text. Now by interpretation, I specifically mean a task distinct from recovering and preserving the text. The Mahabharata itself notes these dual tasks of preservation and inter- pretation: "Learned men elucidate the complex erudition in this Grand Collection; there are those who are experienced in explaining it, others in retaining it."" The former task explains the meaning of the text using many interpretive methods to suit the plural needs of any real life situation." But one method that is directly engendered by the text itself is to use the text to interpret it- the hermeneutic method." NOW, the task of explaining obscure or confusing portions of the text by keeping in view the larger contexts and aims of the text necessarily relies on the organic unity of the text. This unity cannot be first stated positivistically and then applied dogmatically. Nor can the unity be denied without demolishing the text. But this unity is not such that one is confident that every word in the text was written simultaneously by a single author. The hermeneutic approach is a living circle, where the text's unity is presupposed precisely in order to recover and substantiate this unity.

Even serious scholars who have made profound contributions to Mahabharata studies nevertheless view any attempt at interpreting the text with suspicion and out- right derision. For example, van Buitenen, in his introduction to his translation of the Udyogaparvan, includes an entire section of polemic titled "On Myth and Epic-1. Levels of Critictsm. He criticizes those who approach "the epic itself as one titanic myth on its own; and they attempt once more to put holistic interpretations on the Epic. The historical dimension of the text, which after all is an event in history, is in the process forgotten, or rather, consciously cast aside.?" van Buitenen's criticisms are specifically aimed at the French scholars Madeleine Biardeau and Georges Dumezil, although he also includes Dahlmann within the list of unhistorical approaches. But this polemic ends up ascribing views to Biardeau and Dahlmann they neither espoused nor could seriously have contemplated defending. Neither scholar would deny that the text is an event in history, or that this history can be studied-either separately or in conjunction with the text. The point of contention, rather, is whether a text can be reduced to the historical processes that have left their trace in it. The text is indeed an event in history, but is it itself a representation of it? Or is the history of texts a complicated affair, where texts attempt to both preserve and overcome their historical facticity? Apart from the fact that the interaction between texts and history is complex and reciprocal, the "history" a text presents is not necessarily a direct unmediated reproduction of its contemporaneous situation. Add to this the vagaries of histories of texts which are not the same as histories of textual traditions. Indeed, were we to also take our own historical facticity into account, we would use the word "history" with greater caution than scholars commonly do. The equation "history = fact = truth" represents a naive view of both the Enlightenment project and of Hegel's philosophy of history.

 

Contents

 

Indroduction vii
Hermeneutics and Narrative Architecture in the Mahabharata 1
New Possibilities in Considering the Mahabharata's Intention as "History" 29
The Southern Recension of the Mahabharata, the Harivamsa, and Alvar Vaisnavism 63
Ruru, Etymology from Hell 119
Some Textological Observations on the Analytic and Synthetic Modes 135
Greek Sources in the Mahabharata 155

Sample Pages













Ways and Reasons for Thinking About The Mahabharata as a Whole

Item Code:
NAK919
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2013
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
233
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 398 gms
Price:
$40.00
Discounted:
$30.00   Shipping Free
You Save:
$10.00 (25%)
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Ways and Reasons for Thinking About The Mahabharata as a Whole

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 2164 times since 25th Sep, 2016
Introduction

The completion of the Critical Edition of the Mahabharata 1 in 1966 constitutes a significant event in this epic's history. A long and venerable tradition of textual criticism assisted V. S. sukthankar in forging this edition-thus, at the very outset of this essay this scientific method is to be congratulated.' The significance of sukthankar's achievement is best illustrated in the following anecdote related to me by Prof. Dhadphale during the 14th World Sanskrit Conference:

Towards the end of his life Sukthankar increasingly had doubts about the sovereignty of the text-historical approach.' He began to wonder about the meaning of the text itself," When D. D. Kosambi came to visit Sukthankar on his death-bed, it was quite a sad moment. Kosambi wanted to cheer him up, so he said, "Sukthankar, all your life you have sought to reconstruct the oldest possible version of the Mahabharata, but what would you have to say if tomorrow it were announced that an even older manuscript has been discovered, older than any of the manuscripts you have seen?" Kosambi probably thought sukthankar would express regret. sukthankar, however, was quite a serious fellow. He didn't understand that Kosambi was teasing him, so he replied, "how old, Damodar?" Kosambi was surprised, but continued, "Let us say, century or so, definitely pre- Gupta." At this, Sukthankar looked straight at Kosambi and said, "Damodar, if such a manuscript were to be discovered tomorrow, I can tell you that it will correspond exactly to my manuscript excepting a few padas, and even those padas will be the ones under which I have drawn a wavy line."

This anecdote underlines something that is often forgotten in Mahabharata studies: that the critical method has fulfilled its promise and created a workable text-a text ready for a brave new world of interpreting the epic. This is the basic premise of the papers in this volume." Once textual criticism has fulfilled its promise and created not just a workable text, but a comprehensive text that encompasses all the major manuscript traditions, we stand before the challenge of understanding this text. Now by interpretation, I specifically mean a task distinct from recovering and preserving the text. The Mahabharata itself notes these dual tasks of preservation and inter- pretation: "Learned men elucidate the complex erudition in this Grand Collection; there are those who are experienced in explaining it, others in retaining it."" The former task explains the meaning of the text using many interpretive methods to suit the plural needs of any real life situation." But one method that is directly engendered by the text itself is to use the text to interpret it- the hermeneutic method." NOW, the task of explaining obscure or confusing portions of the text by keeping in view the larger contexts and aims of the text necessarily relies on the organic unity of the text. This unity cannot be first stated positivistically and then applied dogmatically. Nor can the unity be denied without demolishing the text. But this unity is not such that one is confident that every word in the text was written simultaneously by a single author. The hermeneutic approach is a living circle, where the text's unity is presupposed precisely in order to recover and substantiate this unity.

Even serious scholars who have made profound contributions to Mahabharata studies nevertheless view any attempt at interpreting the text with suspicion and out- right derision. For example, van Buitenen, in his introduction to his translation of the Udyogaparvan, includes an entire section of polemic titled "On Myth and Epic-1. Levels of Critictsm. He criticizes those who approach "the epic itself as one titanic myth on its own; and they attempt once more to put holistic interpretations on the Epic. The historical dimension of the text, which after all is an event in history, is in the process forgotten, or rather, consciously cast aside.?" van Buitenen's criticisms are specifically aimed at the French scholars Madeleine Biardeau and Georges Dumezil, although he also includes Dahlmann within the list of unhistorical approaches. But this polemic ends up ascribing views to Biardeau and Dahlmann they neither espoused nor could seriously have contemplated defending. Neither scholar would deny that the text is an event in history, or that this history can be studied-either separately or in conjunction with the text. The point of contention, rather, is whether a text can be reduced to the historical processes that have left their trace in it. The text is indeed an event in history, but is it itself a representation of it? Or is the history of texts a complicated affair, where texts attempt to both preserve and overcome their historical facticity? Apart from the fact that the interaction between texts and history is complex and reciprocal, the "history" a text presents is not necessarily a direct unmediated reproduction of its contemporaneous situation. Add to this the vagaries of histories of texts which are not the same as histories of textual traditions. Indeed, were we to also take our own historical facticity into account, we would use the word "history" with greater caution than scholars commonly do. The equation "history = fact = truth" represents a naive view of both the Enlightenment project and of Hegel's philosophy of history.

 

Contents

 

Indroduction vii
Hermeneutics and Narrative Architecture in the Mahabharata 1
New Possibilities in Considering the Mahabharata's Intention as "History" 29
The Southern Recension of the Mahabharata, the Harivamsa, and Alvar Vaisnavism 63
Ruru, Etymology from Hell 119
Some Textological Observations on the Analytic and Synthetic Modes 135
Greek Sources in the Mahabharata 155

Sample Pages













Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Based on your browsing history

Loading... Please wait

Related Items

Essays on the Mahabharata
Item Code: IDI067
$35.00$26.25
You save: $8.75 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Mahabharata: Essays and Translations by Sri Aurobindo
by Sri Aurobindo
Paperback (Edition: 2014)
Sri Aurobindo Ashram
Item Code: NAD020
$15.00$11.25
You save: $3.75 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Mahabharata (Essays and Translations)
by Sri Aurobindo
Paperback (Edition: 2014)
Sri Aurobindo Ashram
Item Code: IDI897
$9.50$7.12
You save: $2.38 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Nitya Yoga (The Yoga of Constant Communion)<br>Essays on the Sreemad Bhagavad Gita
by Vanamali
Hardcover (Edition: 2015)
Aryan Books International
Item Code: IDD894
$35.00$26.25
You save: $8.75 (25%)
SOLD
The Mahabharata An Inquiry in the Human Condition
Item Code: IDJ815
$35.00$26.25
You save: $8.75 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Indian Art of War: The Mahabharata Paradigm
by Brigadier G.D. Bakshi
Hardcover (Edition: 2002)
Sharada Publishing House
Item Code: NAL942
$40.00$30.00
You save: $10.00 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Bridging Souls (A Journey from Mahabharata to Bharata)
Item Code: NAL575
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Lessons from the Mahabharata
by G. N. Das
Hardcover (Edition: 1998)
Abhinav Publications
Item Code: IDE118
$20.00$15.00
You save: $5.00 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Mahabharata: What is not here is nowhere else (Yannehasti na Tadkvacit)
Item Code: IDE807
$35.00$26.25
You save: $8.75 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Mahabharata (Condensed in The Poet’s Own Words)
Item Code: NAI321
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Ethics in the Mahabharata: A Philosophical Inquiry for Today
Item Code: IDI103
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Tales and Teachings of the Mahabharat
by Janaki Abhishekhi
Hardcover (Edition: 1998)
Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan
Item Code: IDK768
$37.50$28.12
You save: $9.38 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Marvels & Mysteries of the Mahabharata (Probing The Folds of India’s Epochal Tragedy)
by Abhijit Basu
Hardcover (Edition: 2013)
Platinum Press
Item Code: NAJ656
$20.00$15.00
You save: $5.00 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

I love your site and although today is my first order, I have been seeing your site for the past several years. Thank you for providing such great art and books to people around the World who can't make it to India as often as we would like.
Rupesh
Heramba Ganapati arrived safely today and was shipped promptly. Another fantastic find from Exotic India with perfect customer service. Thank you. Jai Ganesha Deva
Marc, UK
I ordered Padmapani Statue. I have received my statue. The delivering process was very fast and the statue looks so beautiful. Thank you exoticindia, Mr. Vipin (customer care). I am very satisfied.
Hartono, Indonesia
Very easy to buy, great site! Thanks
Ilda, Brazil
Our Nandi sculpture arrived today and it surpasses all expectations - it is wonderful. We are not only pleasantly surprised by the speed of international delivery but also are extremely grateful for the care of your packaging. Our sculpture needed to travel to an off-lying island of New Zealand but it arrived safely because of how well it had been packaged. Based upon my experience of all aspects of your service, I have no hesitation in recommending Exotic India.
BWM, NZ
Best web site to shop on line.
Suman, USA
Thank you for having such a great website. I have given your site to all the people I get compliments on your merchandise.
Pat, Canada.
Love the website and the breadth of selection. Thanks for assembling such a great collection of art and sculpture.
Richard, USA
Another three books arrived during the last weeks, all of them diligently packed. Excellent reading for the the quieter days at the end of the year. Greetings to Vipin K. and his team.
Walter
Your products are uncommon yet have advanced my knowledge and devotion to Sanatana Dharma. Also, they are reasonably priced and ship quickly. Thank you for all you do.
Gregory, USA
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India