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Shiva and Family

Shiva and Family

Specifications

Item Code: BB03

Batik Painting On Cotton

2.3 ft x 3.7 ft
Price: $40.00   Shipping Free
SOLD
Viewed times since 2nd Oct, 2008

Description

Ganesha is the son of Shiva, the Hindu god of destruction and Parvati, his wife (also known as Uma).

In this artwork is shown Lord Ganesha in blissful harmony in the arms of his parents.

There is an interesting legend behind Ganesha's birth: Incensed by the refusal of her husband to respect her privacy, to the extent of entering her private chambers even while she was having her bath, Parvati decided to settle matters once and for all. Before going for her bath the next time, she rubbed off the sandalwood paste on her body and out of it created the figure of a young boy. She infused life into the figure and told him he was her son and should guard the entrance while she bathed.

Soon after, Shiva (Lord of destruction and husband of Parvati,) came to see Parvati but the young boy blocked his way and would not let him in. Shiva, unaware that this lad was his son, became furious and in great anger fought with this boy whose head got severed from his body in the ensuing battle. Parvati, returning from her bath, saw her headless son and threatened in her rage to destroy the heavens and the earth, so great was her sorrow.

Shiva pacified her and instructed his followers (known as ganas) to bring the head of the first living being they encounter. The first creature they encountered was an elephant. They thus cut off its head and placed it on the body of Parvati's son and breathed life into him. Thus overjoyed, Parvati embraced her son.

Ganesha is shown here holding a lotus in his hands, a symbol of auspiciousness. In another hand he holds a sweet (modaka), symbolic of the sweetness of the realized inner self.

This is a batik painting. Batik is a medium that lies somewhere between art and craft, and is believed to be at least 2000 years old.

The technique of batik is a demanding one. In general, the final design must be conceived before the picture is begun. The batik artist works intimately with color; if he wishes parts of his design to be light yellow, for example, all these parts must be waxed at the same time before any subsequent dyeing. He cannot isolate one part of his design and complete it before moving on to the others as an artist in oils or watercolor may. He must create his design in stages, each of which encompasses the whole picture.

The basic process of batik is simple. It consists of permeating an area of fabric with hot wax so that the wax resists the penetration of dye.

If the cloth we begin with is white, such as bleached cotton, linen, or silk, then wherever we apply hot wax that area will remain white in the final design. After the first waxing the fabric is dipped into a dye bath whose color is the lightest tone of those to be used. When the piece has dried, we see an area of white and an area of cloth that is the color of the first dyeing. Wax is now applied to those parts in which we wish to retain the first color, and the entire fabric is immersed in the second dye bath whose color is darker in tone than the first. This process is repeated until the darkest tone required in the final design has been achieved. When the fabric, now almost wholly waxed, has dried it is placed between sheets of absorbent paper and a hot iron applied. As the sheets of paper absorb the wax they are replaced by fresh sheets until the wax is removed. At this point the final design is seen clearly for the first time.

As with painting, color is an integral part of batik. A painter uses pigment; a batik artist uses dyes. The Painter can, if he chooses, completely obliterate an undesirable color by covering it with another color. Perhaps he must wait until the unwanted color is dry, but there is no doubt about it, he has another chance, he can cover up his mistake.

In batik the correction of mistakes, in most cases, is impossible. The Painter is not limited in any way in the variety of colors he uses and juxtaposes. In batik, however, each color used is significantly changed by the proceeding color; or at least it is certainly affected by the color "underneath". The only pure color is the first one, so all other colors used are mixtures, determined largely by the first color, or the first strong color.


Delivered by to all international destinations within 3 to 5 days, fully insured.

Of Related Interest:

Shiva Parivaar (Batik Painting On Silk)

Shiva and Family (Miniature Painting On Paper)

Shiva Parvati (Comic Book)

The Sons of Shiva (Comic Book)

Shiva-Parvati (Book)

Parvati the Love Goddess: Tales of Marriage and Devotion in Art and Mythology (Article)

Shiva - The Sensuous Yogi (Article)

Ganesha : the Elephant Headed God, Art and Mythology (Article)

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