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Six-Armed Winged Vajrakumara (Vajrakila) Father-Mother

Six-Armed Winged Vajrakumara (Vajrakila) Father-Mother

Specifications

Item Code: TK86

Tibetan Thangka Painting

Size of Painted Surface 17.0" X 26.5"
Size with Brocade 27.5" X 40.0"
Price: $255.00   Shipping Free - 4 to 6 days
SOLD
Viewed times since 2nd Oct, 2008

Description

The esoteric black thangka portrays winged form of Vajrakila Yab-Yum. Vajrakila or Vajrakumara is an archetype deity of the Nyingma tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. This archetype deity relates to the triangular dagger kila or kilaya itself, which represents the ultimate reality of the three doors of liberation – voidness, singleness, and wishlessness – and the unity of the Three Bodies of Buddhahood, mobilized here into a one-pointed force for conquering evil and transmuting it into goodness. The cult of Vajrakila is very much famous in Tibet, Nepal, Mongolia and China. It is said that lay devotees generally invoke and worship powerful deity for protection from evil spirits and negative forces and also to perceive esoteric knowledge.

Here deep blue complexioned Vajrakila is shown in terrific union with his consort (wisdom or Prajna). He is dancing ecstatically and closely embracing his consort. Together they represent the union of wisdom (female) and artful method (male), which is compassion's action. The expression of both the deities are extremely terrifying. They stand on prostrate figures, one male and one female, symbolizing their triumph over delusion. Vajrakila has three heads, six-arms and four legs. He is embracing his consort with his two principal hands, and also holding a triangular dagger (kila) or (phurpa), in the same manner as when single. His remaining two right hands are holding vajra, while his upper left hand is in threatening gesture and the lower left hand holds trident-tipped khatvanga staff. His all three heads wear crown of skulls with jewels. His hair is upswept in loose, however center portion of his hair is tied in loose knot with the decoration of half vajra and serpent. There is flying Garuda with a snake on the top of his hair. Moreover he is adorned with a long garland of severed human heads, elephant skin cloak, human skin, tiger-skin skirt and exquisitely designed gold ornaments – hoop earrings, armlets, bracelets and anklets.

His Consort (Prajna) is closely embracing him. Her right hand is around his neck and She lifts a skull bowl in her left hand, offering sips of its elixir to her lord. Her right leg is extended along his, while the left is wrapped around his waist. She is also adorned with a crown of skulls with jewels, a long garland of human skulls, a leopard-skin skirt and gold ornaments. There is protective fire aureole with clouds behind the back of Vajrakila. Adi-Buddha Samantabhadra Father-Mother is seated on the top in clouds with rainbow streams. Two flying eagles with snakes are depicted below the upper corners. The middle ground shows plain mountainous landscape, while the foreground depicts, stylized trees, peaceful and wrathful offerings, and a beautiful lake. The dark setting of the painting is effective in creating a serious mood; hence it is very much suitable for esoteric practices and rituals.

Select Bibliography

Ben Meulenbeld, Buddhist Symbolism in Tibetan Thangka, Holland, 2001

J.C. Huntington and D. Bangdel, The Circle of Bliss: Buddhist Meditational Art, Ohio, 2004

Marylin M. Rhie & Robert A.F. Thurman, Wisdom and Compassion: The Sacred Art of Tibet, Thames and Hudson, 1996

Marylin M. Rhie & Robert A.F. Thurman, Worlds of Transformation: Tibetan Art of Wisdom and Compassion, New York, 1999

R. Linrothe & J. Watt, Demonic Divine: Himalayan Art and Beyond, New York, 2005

This description is by Dr. Shailendra K. Verma, whose Doctorate thesis is on "Emergence and Evolution of the Buddha Image (From its inception to 8th century A.D.)".

Click Here to View the Thangka Painting along with its Brocade


Delivered by to all international destinations within 3 to 5 days, fully insured.

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