Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > History > Biography > Gandhi Gandhism and the Gandhians
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Gandhi Gandhism and the Gandhians
Gandhi Gandhism and the Gandhians
Description
From the Jacket

Mahatma Gandhi and his philosophy of truth and nonviolence have intrigued the world for decades. Looking at the Western and Indian influences that had gone into making Gandhi the Mahatma, and the central importance of Gandhi to nonviolent activism, these essays reclaim the power of truth an on violence, which can still change the destinies of people and nations.

In this collection Thomas Weber discusses Gandhi, his ideology, and how India and the rest of the world is interpreting and reinterpreting the Mahatma. The doctrine of conflict resolution theory, new environmentalism, peace research, deep ecology, and Buddhist economics based on Gandhian principles, renews the world's belief in Mahatma and his teachings for our life and our times.

Thomas Weber teaches politics and peace studies at Melbourne's La Trobe University. He has been researching and writing on Gandhi's life, thought and legacy for over twenty years. His Gandhi-related publications include Conflict Resolution and Gandhian Ethics; Hugging the Tress: The Story of the Chipko Movement; Gandhi's Peace Army; On the Salt March; Nonviolent Intervention Across Borders (Edited with Yeshua Moser-Puangsuwan); and Gandhi as Disciple and Mentor.

Foreword

Before remarking on Thomas Weber's latest book on Gandhi, let me refer to my experience of the frequency with which Gandhi is invoked in the United States, where I have been a visiting professor from the late 1990s, and offer my understanding of why this is the case..

Two African-Americans recall on TV their role in the 1963 sit-in in a restaurant in Birmingham, Alabama, when they stayed at the lunch counter until they received service or the lunch counter closed down. They say that Gandhi's fight in India inspired their successful protest in the American South. Asked (also on TV) to name a favorite hero from the last century, a young man says 'Gandhi'. As I write these words today (10 July 2006), Michael Lerner, a Jewish rabbi actively working for justice in the Middle East, reiterates (in a blog) his view that Palestinians 'would be far more effective if they were to adopt the nonviolent strategies of Gandhi, King, and Mandela'.

One reason for remembering Gandhi is the glaring failure of violence to achieve results in places like Palestine, Kashmir, Chechnya and Sri Lanka. Tried year after year, violence has not only failed to obtain the redress asked for; it has obscured rather than highlighted the issues at stake. We are intrigued therefore by Gandhi's nonviolence.

Our greater understanding of the dangers from global warming also foregrounds Gandhi, who insisted on clean air and clean water as an Indian village's first need. Most of all, perhaps, people think of Gandhi as someone who showed that the weak can stand up to the strong.

A scholar of conflict resolution and a well-known researcher of Gandhi's life, ideas and legacy, Tom Weber has contributed immensely to our understanding of one of Gandhi's greatest initiatives through his outstanding and meticulous book, on the Salt March. No one writing on Gandhi or on the Salt March can afford to give that work a miss.

With his legal background Weber hunts for facts when others seem content to record feelings and perceptions. In Gandhi, Gandhism and the Gandhians, he revisits the march; examines Gandhi in the light of modern conflict resolution theory; makes a comparative study of two famous Indians who tried to apply Gandhi's strategies and principles, Vinoba Bhave and Jayaprakash Narayan; critiques the Shanti Sena that Gandhi hoped would intervene courageously and nonviolently in conflicts; looks at Gandhi in the economic and ecological contexts; and analyses why the number of Gandhians in today's India ha dwindled.

On the last question, Weber has done more than almost anyone else to learn about and describe individuals in the rank-and-file that enabled Gandhi's movements to succeed. Perhaps rank-and-file is an unjust phrase-many of these individuals were leaders in their own right and contributors to the making of history. But they remained in the shadows. Weber has performed a great service in throwing light on their fascinating lives. But I am not wholly comfortable about the phrase 'Gandhians', and I am sure Weber shares the unease. There are times of course when the phrase is unavoidable, and it also seems reasonable, for how else would you describe individuals trying to apply Gandhi's ideas and methods to their situations? Yet apart from the fact that Gandhi himself was unwilling to sponsor any 'Gandhian' group or following, if these 'ideas and methods' of Gandhi are understood; in their broadest terms, then many have pursued and will pursue these without necessarily using the Gandhi name.

As I see it, and perhaps Weber may agree, anyone who honestly and fully follows his mind and conscience does what Gandhi did and what Gandhi would want us to do. Both mind and conscience were of vital importance to Gandhi, who strove to be as innocent as a child but also as astute as the fight against an empire required.

But; he completely rejected a worship of the mind that neglected the conscience. Whether religious or non-religious, the conscience steers us towards what is necessary, what is right, what is just; it provides a key corrective to the mind, which can always find reasons for doing what is convenient and what we want.

As long as India and the world contain people committed to obey both their minds and consciences, the tribe of 'Gandhians' will endure. It is a tribe that Tom Weber has stimulated and nurtured. I warmly welcome his latest offering.

CONTENTS
ForewordVII
IntroductionX
IGandhi
1Kharag Bahadur Singh: The Eightieth Marcher3
2Historiography and the Dandi March:
The Other Myths of Gandhi' Salt March
20
3Gandhi Moves47
4Gandhi and the Nobel Prize95
II Gandhism
5Legal Ethics/Gandhian Ethics123
6Gandhian Philosophy, Conflict Resolution Theory and Practical Approaches to Negotiation143
7'The Marchers Simply Walked Forward Until Struck Down': Nonviolent Suffering and Conversion181
8The Lesson from the Disciples: Is There a Contradiction in Gandhi's Philosophy of Action ? 207
III. Gandhians
9Peacekeeping, the Shanti Sena and Divisions in the Gandhian Movement During the Border War with China235
10A Brief History of the Shanti Sena as Seen Through the Changing Pledges of the Shanti Sainik254
11Gandhi is Dead. Long Lie Gandhi: The Post-Gandhi Gandhian Movement in India269
12Gandhi, Deep Ecology, Peace Research and Buddhist Economics317
Bibliography340

Gandhi Gandhism and the Gandhians

Item Code:
IDI583
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2006
ISBN:
8174364684
Size:
8.6"X 5.5
Pages:
382
Price:
$32.50   Shipping Free
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Gandhi Gandhism and the Gandhians

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 8896 times since 2nd Oct, 2008
From the Jacket

Mahatma Gandhi and his philosophy of truth and nonviolence have intrigued the world for decades. Looking at the Western and Indian influences that had gone into making Gandhi the Mahatma, and the central importance of Gandhi to nonviolent activism, these essays reclaim the power of truth an on violence, which can still change the destinies of people and nations.

In this collection Thomas Weber discusses Gandhi, his ideology, and how India and the rest of the world is interpreting and reinterpreting the Mahatma. The doctrine of conflict resolution theory, new environmentalism, peace research, deep ecology, and Buddhist economics based on Gandhian principles, renews the world's belief in Mahatma and his teachings for our life and our times.

Thomas Weber teaches politics and peace studies at Melbourne's La Trobe University. He has been researching and writing on Gandhi's life, thought and legacy for over twenty years. His Gandhi-related publications include Conflict Resolution and Gandhian Ethics; Hugging the Tress: The Story of the Chipko Movement; Gandhi's Peace Army; On the Salt March; Nonviolent Intervention Across Borders (Edited with Yeshua Moser-Puangsuwan); and Gandhi as Disciple and Mentor.

Foreword

Before remarking on Thomas Weber's latest book on Gandhi, let me refer to my experience of the frequency with which Gandhi is invoked in the United States, where I have been a visiting professor from the late 1990s, and offer my understanding of why this is the case..

Two African-Americans recall on TV their role in the 1963 sit-in in a restaurant in Birmingham, Alabama, when they stayed at the lunch counter until they received service or the lunch counter closed down. They say that Gandhi's fight in India inspired their successful protest in the American South. Asked (also on TV) to name a favorite hero from the last century, a young man says 'Gandhi'. As I write these words today (10 July 2006), Michael Lerner, a Jewish rabbi actively working for justice in the Middle East, reiterates (in a blog) his view that Palestinians 'would be far more effective if they were to adopt the nonviolent strategies of Gandhi, King, and Mandela'.

One reason for remembering Gandhi is the glaring failure of violence to achieve results in places like Palestine, Kashmir, Chechnya and Sri Lanka. Tried year after year, violence has not only failed to obtain the redress asked for; it has obscured rather than highlighted the issues at stake. We are intrigued therefore by Gandhi's nonviolence.

Our greater understanding of the dangers from global warming also foregrounds Gandhi, who insisted on clean air and clean water as an Indian village's first need. Most of all, perhaps, people think of Gandhi as someone who showed that the weak can stand up to the strong.

A scholar of conflict resolution and a well-known researcher of Gandhi's life, ideas and legacy, Tom Weber has contributed immensely to our understanding of one of Gandhi's greatest initiatives through his outstanding and meticulous book, on the Salt March. No one writing on Gandhi or on the Salt March can afford to give that work a miss.

With his legal background Weber hunts for facts when others seem content to record feelings and perceptions. In Gandhi, Gandhism and the Gandhians, he revisits the march; examines Gandhi in the light of modern conflict resolution theory; makes a comparative study of two famous Indians who tried to apply Gandhi's strategies and principles, Vinoba Bhave and Jayaprakash Narayan; critiques the Shanti Sena that Gandhi hoped would intervene courageously and nonviolently in conflicts; looks at Gandhi in the economic and ecological contexts; and analyses why the number of Gandhians in today's India ha dwindled.

On the last question, Weber has done more than almost anyone else to learn about and describe individuals in the rank-and-file that enabled Gandhi's movements to succeed. Perhaps rank-and-file is an unjust phrase-many of these individuals were leaders in their own right and contributors to the making of history. But they remained in the shadows. Weber has performed a great service in throwing light on their fascinating lives. But I am not wholly comfortable about the phrase 'Gandhians', and I am sure Weber shares the unease. There are times of course when the phrase is unavoidable, and it also seems reasonable, for how else would you describe individuals trying to apply Gandhi's ideas and methods to their situations? Yet apart from the fact that Gandhi himself was unwilling to sponsor any 'Gandhian' group or following, if these 'ideas and methods' of Gandhi are understood; in their broadest terms, then many have pursued and will pursue these without necessarily using the Gandhi name.

As I see it, and perhaps Weber may agree, anyone who honestly and fully follows his mind and conscience does what Gandhi did and what Gandhi would want us to do. Both mind and conscience were of vital importance to Gandhi, who strove to be as innocent as a child but also as astute as the fight against an empire required.

But; he completely rejected a worship of the mind that neglected the conscience. Whether religious or non-religious, the conscience steers us towards what is necessary, what is right, what is just; it provides a key corrective to the mind, which can always find reasons for doing what is convenient and what we want.

As long as India and the world contain people committed to obey both their minds and consciences, the tribe of 'Gandhians' will endure. It is a tribe that Tom Weber has stimulated and nurtured. I warmly welcome his latest offering.

CONTENTS
ForewordVII
IntroductionX
IGandhi
1Kharag Bahadur Singh: The Eightieth Marcher3
2Historiography and the Dandi March:
The Other Myths of Gandhi' Salt March
20
3Gandhi Moves47
4Gandhi and the Nobel Prize95
II Gandhism
5Legal Ethics/Gandhian Ethics123
6Gandhian Philosophy, Conflict Resolution Theory and Practical Approaches to Negotiation143
7'The Marchers Simply Walked Forward Until Struck Down': Nonviolent Suffering and Conversion181
8The Lesson from the Disciples: Is There a Contradiction in Gandhi's Philosophy of Action ? 207
III. Gandhians
9Peacekeeping, the Shanti Sena and Divisions in the Gandhian Movement During the Border War with China235
10A Brief History of the Shanti Sena as Seen Through the Changing Pledges of the Shanti Sainik254
11Gandhi is Dead. Long Lie Gandhi: The Post-Gandhi Gandhian Movement in India269
12Gandhi, Deep Ecology, Peace Research and Buddhist Economics317
Bibliography340
Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Gandhi Gandhism and the Gandhians (History | Books)

Between Gandhi and Hitler: The Forgotten Freedom Fighter (DVD)
Sound Entertainment (2009)
60 min. Approx
Item Code: IZZ782
$28.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Ram Raga: Essence of All Prayer (Commemorating 60th Anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi's Martyrdom) (Audio CD)
Pandit Chhannulal Mishra
Devi Foundation (2008)
1 hr Approx.
Item Code: IZZ713
$22.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Homage to Mahatma Gandhi: Raga Mohan Kauns and Raga Hemant (Audio CD)
Pt. Ravi Shankar and Ustad Alla Rakha
Universal Music India Pvt. Ltd.(2008)
Item Code: IZZ502
$24.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Path of Non-Violence: With Mahatma Gandhi and Nelson Mandela (The Discovering History Series) (DVD)
Shemaroo Entertainment Pvt. Ltd.(2010)
78 mins. Approx.
Item Code: IZZ578
$28.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Poet & The Mahatma: tagore and Gandhi (A Documentary Film on DVD)
Debabrata Roy
Baba International Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IZZ178
$40.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Bapu Kuti: Journeys in Rediscovery of Gandhi
by RAJNI BAKSHI
Paperback (Edition: 1998)
Penguin Books
Item Code: IDE402
$22.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Gandhi Quiz
Item Code: NAE230
$15.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Gandhi's Prisoner? : The Life of Gandhi's Son Manilal
by Uma Dhupelia & Mesthrie
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
Permanent Black
Item Code: IDE154
$55.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Dear friends, I just placed my order for one Radhe-Shyam copper bangle and I am looking forward to seeing the quality of your products. I have been searching for years for this price range of bangle with 'Radhe Radhe' or 'Radhe-Shyam'. I may add more items as I was not through shopping when I clicked on PayPal. Thanks sooo much for providing such hard-to-find and fair-priced items! Sincerely, David Briscoe
David, USA
I got my two dupattas today and I'm SO HAPPY! Thank you so much. Such amazing quality and the pictures totally do it justice They are beautiful!!! Thank you
Nony, USA
I received my Ganesha Purana order today Books received in good condition and delivery was very fast. Thank you very much..:)) Very good customer service.
Lukesh sithambaram
I'm happy to order from you and not the global monopoly that is Amazon. ;)
Tom, USA
A great 'Dorje' has arrived. Thank you for your sincerity.
Hideo, Japan
Thank you for your amazing customer service! I ordered Liberating Isolation Sunday, March 24 and received it Friday, March 29! Much sooner than expected:) The book was packaged nicely and is in great shape! Thank you again!
James, USA
Om Shanti Shanti Shanti !!! Exotic India Thank You Thank You Thank You !!!
Fotis Kosmidis
Hi, I would like to thankyou for your excellent service. Postage was quick. Books were packaged well and all in good condition.
Pauline, Australia
Thank you very much. Your sale prices are wonderful.
Michael, USA
Kailash Raj’s art, as always, is marvelous. We are so grateful to you for allowing your team to do these special canvases for us. Rarely do we see this caliber of art in modern times. Kailash Ji has taken the Swaminaryan monks’ suggestions to heart and executed each one with accuracy and a spiritual touch.
Sadasivanathaswami, Hawaii
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2019 © Exotic India