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Books > Hindu > Festivals & Rituals > Holistic Approach of The Vedas
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Holistic Approach of The Vedas
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Holistic Approach of The Vedas
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From the Jacket

Editor: Prof. Vachaspati Upadhyaya

The Brahmana texts are known for the obscurity of their philosophical expositions. It is not easy to decipher the recondite thoughts enshrined in them but what is heartening is that Prof. Dayanand Bhargava has not only fathomed their depths by delving deep into these primary sources but has also presented his findings in a style which is at once fascinating and illuminating. Many western scholars like Fritof Capra have written copiously on these line but their writings are normally shorn of reference to the primary sources. Viewed from this standpoint Prof. Dayanand Bhargava’s work is a significant contribution to the cause of interpreting the Vedic obscurity in a modern idiom which scholars all over the world will find useful and interesting.

Needless to say that this work is very much relevant to the modern times as it propounds a holistic paradigm which is eco-friendly based on concept of sustainable development which combines peace with prosperity for the whole humanity.

I am confident that this work will prove to be a welcome addition to the existing identical literature of the East and the West.

 

About the Author

Reader Department of Sanskrit University of Delhi.

Principal Kendriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth Jammu & Allahabad

Professor & Head Department of Sanskrit University of Jodhpur
• Dean Faculty of Arts, Education & Social Sciences University of Jodhpure.
• Department of Jainolgy and Comparative Religion & Philosophy Jain Vishva Bharati Institute (Deemed University) Ladnun

Chairman Veda Vachaspati Pandit Madusudan Ojha (Veda Vijnana) Peeth Jagadguru Ramananda charya Sanskrit vishvavidyalaya Jaipur.

 

Editor’s Note

Notwithstanding the difference of opinion regarding the date of the Vedas and the entitlement of the Brahmana-texts to the status of the Veda, the Vedas represent the oldest literature of the world and the Brahmana-texts represent the earliest attempt to interpret that literature. Admittedly the interpretation of the Brähmana-texts is ritual- oriented but the latest researches have shown it beyond doubt that the Vedic rituals have a strong spiritual foundation. The Brãhmana-texts thus form a bridge between the karmakanda of the Vedas and jnanakanda of the Upanisads. This approach of the Brahmana-texts, providing a formidable bridge between the active and the spiritual life, is defined by the term vijnana by the Taittiriya Aranyaka Yajna, which is a Vedic ritual, is amplified by vijnana so as to bring out its hidden spiritual significance. The Brahmanas do it by means of art havada-vakyas, which explain the logic of a vidhi or prescription of the Vedic ritual.

It was on the basis of this vijnana aspect of the Brahmana-texts, that an eminent scholar of Jaipur, Pandit Madhusudan Ojha, wrote about a hundred works in chaste Sanskrit during the last century. Some of his important works, along with some other works written on the same line, have been surveyed in the present work. Not only did traditional stalwarts like Mahamahopadhyaya Pandit Giridhar Sharma Chaturvedi, Pandit Motilal Shastri and Svãmi Suijana Dass expressed their views following this line of approach, but modem scholars like Dr. V.S. Agrawal also devoted a large part of their scholarly works to the development of this school of thought.

In recent times Shri K.C. Kulish, the founder-editor of Rajasthan Patrika, a Hindi Daily, did a lot to propagate the above mentioned literature. Professor Dayanand Bhargava, an old friend of mine, came into contact with Shri K.C. Kulish and felt the need of presenting the essence of the vijnãna aspect of the Brahmana-texts through modern scientific research methodology. The present work embodies the result of his rigorously followed studies of the last two decades.

Dr. Bhargava has also been following the latest researches in the field of science along with his Vedic studies. Only the other day, he was talking about the efficacy of mantra by support of the scientific researches carried by a Japanese scholar, Masaru Emoto who wrote four volumes under the title the Hidden Messages of the water in which it has been shown how water responds to our words of praise and condemnation. If we speak in terms of praise to water it forms beautiful crystals when frozen but it we condemn it, it forms ugly crystals in a haphazard manner. It means that water, air, fire etc., which are profusely addressed in the Vedas are not blind to our prayers. Vedic mantras assume a new significance in the light of such findings.

In the present work such parallels as that of the famous formula with the definition of yajna as the process of inter change of consciousness and matter into each other have been frequently drawn. This and many other finding well documented with about 1000 quotations from the Vedic literature make the present work valuable not only for the orient lists but also the scientists who are interested such problems as tracing the origin of the universe.

The Brahmana texts are known for the obscurity of their philosophical expositions. It is not easy to decipher the recondite thoughts enshrined in them but what is heartening is that Prof. Dayanand Bhargava Bhargava’s has not only fathomed their depths by delving deep into these primary sources but has also presented his findings in a style which is at once fascinating and illuminating. Many western scholars like Fritof Capra have written copiously on these line but their writings are normally shorn of reference to the primary sources. Viewed from this standpoint Prof. Dayanand Bhargava’s work is a significant contribution to the cause of interpreting the Vedic thought in a modern idiom which scholars all over the world will find useful and interesting.

Needless to say that this work is very much relevant to the modern times as it propounds a holistic paradigm which is eco friendly based on concept of sustainable development which combines peace with prosperity for the whole humanity at a global level.

I am confident that this work will prove to be a welcome addition to the already existing literature of the East and the West on the Vedas.

 

Contents

 

Acknowledgements V
Scheme of Transliteration VII
Editor’s Note IX
Chapter One Introduction
An Overview of the Approach of the Vedas
 
The Mystery 3
Consciousness the Origin of the Universe 4
The Whole and the part 4
Esoteric style 5
The Divine Triad 6
The Divine Triad and the four Vedas 6
Trayi and Atharva Veda 6
The Duad of Agni and Soma 7
Symbolism the Vedas 8
The Tradition of the Brahmana Texts 9
Cosmos oriented Approach 10
The difficulty of terminology 10
The Model of nature 11
The Art of Living 11
Arya is not a race 12
Knowledge and action 13
Holistic Approach neglected 13
The Divine Science 14
Unity in Diversity 15
Mind and Matter 15
Creator and the creation 16
The Relation of the whole and its parts 16
One Becomes many 17
Four Quadruplet 17
Four Duads 18
Triads 19
The Process of Assimilation 19
The Seasons 20
The Cow 20
Our Bodies 22
The Philosophy of Dynamism 22
Desires 22
The Man 23
The Evolution 24
The Ends of Human life 26
The Five Layers at Micro and macro level 26
The Yajna and our life 27
Chapter Two
Harmony
29-43
The Vedic Ethos  
Worldly well being 31
Education 34
Family Life 34
The Cow 36
Harmony 36
Aryas 37
Pauranic Geography 39
Wars 39
Spiritualism 41
Morality 41
Monotheism 42
Conclusion 43
Chapter Three
Pioneers
45-78
A Survey of the representative Major works  
Brahmanas are the part and parcel of the Vedas 48
Two Portions of the Brahmanas 48
Neglect of Arthavada Portion 48
Condemnation of the Brahmanas 49
Holistic Approach of Modern Science and the Brahmanas 49
Works of Madhusudan Ojha 50
Works of Cosmology 50
Works on Ethics and rituals 51
Works of Giridhara Sharma Chaturvedi: A Disciple of Madhusudan Ojha 52
A Brief summary of Madhusuddan Ojha’s approach 52
The Essence of the four Vedas (Tattva-veda) 52
The Trinity 54
Becoming and being 54
The Universe 55
Macrocosm and Microcosm 55
Sacrifice at Macro level 56
Institutional Aspect of the Vedic view point 57
Shri V.s. Agrawala, Agra 1959 43
Published by 1972, (Second Edition) 66
Sparks from the Vedic fire by Prof. V.S. Agrawala (Benaras, 1962) 70
Before the beginning and after the end by Shri Rishi Kumar Mishra (New Delhi 2000) 75
Chapter Four
Four Vedas
79-100
The Meaning of the Nomenclature of the Vedas  
The Authority of Manu 82
The Evidence of the Brahmana Texts 82
The Position of Atharva Veda Vstrayl 83
Texts Human Creation but not the reality 85
All Pervasiveness of Trayl 86
Trayl in Space 86
Trayl in Territory 86
Trayl in Time 86
Two Formulas 86
Trayl in Dvijas 87
Extension of Trayl 87
Veda and Vedanta 87
Rgveda 88
Yajus 89
Samveda 91
Atharvaveda 96
Veda as Brahma 97
Chapter Five
Psychic Energies
101-128
Treatment of Vedic Devas Rsis, Chandas and Piraras  
Difference between Deva and Devata 103
Number of Devas 103
The Basis of Monotheism 104
The Basis of Polytheism 105
The Role of Trayl 105
Three Fold Division of thirty three days 106
Anthropomorphic Nature of Devas 106
The Characteristics of Devas 107
Agni 109
Vayu 111
Indra 113
Aditya 116
Indra 117
Dhata 118
Pusa 118
Mira Varuna 118
Aryama 118
Chandas 120
Rssis 123
Pitaras 126
Chapter Six
Divine Trinity
129-154
Mana, Prana and Vak  
The Concept of Purusa 131
The Relation of three Pususas 132
Rasa and Bala 134
Five Kalas of Avyaya 134
Prajapati 135
Mana 136
Prana 143
Prana and Vak 145
Vak 148
Vak as Agni 148
Vak As constituent of Atma 149
Vak as Prajapati 149
Vak in Five Fold Universe 150
Aksara Purusa 151
Principle of Movement 151
Five Kalas of Aksara 151
The Formation of womb 152
Ksara Purusa 153
Quintuplication 153
Chapter Seven
Micro Level
155-184
Self and life hereafter  
The Meaning of Atma 157
Micro and Macro 157
Vedic Terms 157
The Trinity 159
Trivrtkarana 159
Three Questions 161
The Concepts of Equality 161
Give and take 162
Divine Yajna and Human personality 162
Macro Level 163
The Question of Rights 163
Food and Personality 164
Five fold Personality 166
Gross Body or Annamayakosa 168
Pranamayakosa 168
Manomayakosa 169
Vijnanamayakosa 169
Anandamayakosa 171
Different Concepts of Self 172
Three Stages 173
The Transcendental Stage 174
Part II  
Life Hereafter 176
Re-Birth 176
Heaven 177
Liberation 178
Different Paths 180
Nerves Channels 182
Chapter Eight
The Origin of Universe
185-206
Brahmavada and ten theories of Purva-Paksa  
Vital Energies 188
Two Movements 189
Desires 190
The Birth of Devas 191
Penance 192
Ten theories 194
Sadvada Asadvada 195
Rajovada 197
Aparavada 200
Avaranavada 201
Ambhovada 202
Ahoratravada 203
Deva Vada 205
Samsaya Vada 205
Conclusion 205
Chapter Nine
Structure of Universe
Five Fold (Pancha-Parva) Universe
207-218
Three Kinds of Creation 209
Three Tier Universe 210
Stability in Movement 211
Five Tier Universe 211
Yajna in the Universe 213
Correspondence of the Universe 216
Movement in the Universe 217
Universe and the Man 217
Chapter Ten
Philosophy of Action
 
The Meaning of Yajna 221
Knowledge and Action 221
Unselfishness 222
Non Possessiveness 222
Essentiality of Karma 222
Creation As a Yajna 223
Five Fold Yajna 223
Liberation and Yajna 224
Another Five Fold Yajna 224
Modern Science and Yajna 226
Einstein and the process of Yajna A Comparison 226
Definition of Yajna by Rsi Aitareya 227
Consciousness in Modern Science 227
Process of Yajna according to Brahmana texts 228
The Role of will power 228
The Role of Vital powers 228
The Vedic Devas and Trayl Vidya 229
Psychology of Yajna 230
Trayl and the classical philosophy 230
Gosava Yajna 230
Cayana Yajna 231
Cit and Citis 231
Punasciti 232
Yajna in the body 232
Karma Yoga 233
Categories of Karmas 233
Tapa 235
Dana 235
Man and Morality 235
Chapter Eleven
Celestial Song
237-268
The Gita: Essence of the Vedas  
The Meaning of the Title of the Gita 240
What is the Meaning of Bhagavan 240
Detachment 240
Knowledge 240
Aisvarya 241
Dharma 241
What is Upanisad 241
What makes a Karma Kamya 242
Gita The Application 242
Classification of the Contents of the Gita 242
Twenty Four Upanisads of the Gita 243
The Higher and the lower Self 245
Two Alternatives 246
Sensuous Pleasures 246
Knowledge of the Immutable 246
Diversity because of limitation 246
Soul is free from modification 247
Obstacles and progress 247
Role of Intellect 247
Buddhi Yoga 248
The Witness 248
Attachment 248
The Nature of Desires 249
The Desire to create 249
Desires 249
Natural desires 250
Nature 250
Wishes of God 250
Concepts of Duty 250
All duties are Equal 251
Performance of duty is not a sin 251
Brahma and Ksatra 251
Injustice 252
Role of Punishment 252
Nature of Reality 252
Change the Aim of Action 253
Action and knowledge 254
Development 255
Education 257
What is Yoga 258
The Root cause of Misery 258
Extroversion and introversion 258
The Three Attitudes 259
Means of Success 259
Three Fold Karmas 259
Another Classification if Karmas 260
Karmas and Division of Life Span 260
Effect and Result of Karma 260
How Karmas Yield Their Results 261
Samskaras 261
Karma and Dharma 262
Yajna in the Nature 262
The Model of divine Way of Acting 263
Harmony 264
Three Bodies 264
Soul: The Source of Happiness 264
Enjoyments 265
Three Kinds of Openness 265
Gradation 265
Happiness of Openness 266
Three Layers of Purusa 266
Ksara Purusa 266
Aksara Purusa 267
Avyaya Purusa 267
Preference for Karma Yoga 268
Bhumodarka 268
Chapter Twelve
Epilogue
269-277
Indian Culture: The Holistic Approach of the Vedas  
Holistic Approach 271
Four ends of human life 272
Material Aspect 272
Trivarga 272
Summum Bonum of life 272
Four Asramas 273
Four Varnas 273
Four Vedas 274
Rgveda 274
Yajurveda 275
Samaveda 275
Apara and Para 276
Atharvaveda 276
Appendix One
The Space Time Continuum
279-303
An Introduction of the two Kalasuktas of the Atharvaveda  
Place of Kala 281
Kala and Mahakala 281
The Real View of Kala 282
Practical view 282
What is present 283
Natural Watches 283
Time And movement 284
Division of time 284
Life Span of Deva 284
Caturyuga 284
Life Span of Sun 286
Present Age of Sun 286
The Smaller Divisions of time 287
Beyond the Solar System 288
Pure Movement 288
Infinite Time Contains the practical time 288
Kala and Movement 289
Role of Kala 289
The Process of Manifestation illustrated 289
Another Role of Movement 290
Five Forms of Movement 290
Trinity of Time 290
The Relations of Time and Space 290
The Role of Chanda 292
Time Eats and We Eat Time 292
Two Forms of Samvatsara 292
Why the Movement is Circular 292
First Kala Sukta Explained 293
Second Kala Sukta Explained 300
Appendix Two 304-311
A Brief Survey of Works on Vedic Literature  
Works on Cosmology 305
Works on Ethics 305
Works on Vedas From Arya Samaja’s View Point 306
Works on the Philosophy of the Vedas 307
Aurobindo’s Approach 308
Vedas as the Source Book of Philosophy 309
Appendix Three 312-315
A Note on the Position of Atharvaveda
(from the introduction of Swami Surjan Dass of Sabda Veda, Compiled by Shri K.C. Kulish)
 
Bibliography 316-322

 

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Holistic Approach of The Vedas

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2007
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English
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From the Jacket

Editor: Prof. Vachaspati Upadhyaya

The Brahmana texts are known for the obscurity of their philosophical expositions. It is not easy to decipher the recondite thoughts enshrined in them but what is heartening is that Prof. Dayanand Bhargava has not only fathomed their depths by delving deep into these primary sources but has also presented his findings in a style which is at once fascinating and illuminating. Many western scholars like Fritof Capra have written copiously on these line but their writings are normally shorn of reference to the primary sources. Viewed from this standpoint Prof. Dayanand Bhargava’s work is a significant contribution to the cause of interpreting the Vedic obscurity in a modern idiom which scholars all over the world will find useful and interesting.

Needless to say that this work is very much relevant to the modern times as it propounds a holistic paradigm which is eco-friendly based on concept of sustainable development which combines peace with prosperity for the whole humanity.

I am confident that this work will prove to be a welcome addition to the existing identical literature of the East and the West.

 

About the Author

Reader Department of Sanskrit University of Delhi.

Principal Kendriya Sanskrit Vidyapeeth Jammu & Allahabad

Professor & Head Department of Sanskrit University of Jodhpur
• Dean Faculty of Arts, Education & Social Sciences University of Jodhpure.
• Department of Jainolgy and Comparative Religion & Philosophy Jain Vishva Bharati Institute (Deemed University) Ladnun

Chairman Veda Vachaspati Pandit Madusudan Ojha (Veda Vijnana) Peeth Jagadguru Ramananda charya Sanskrit vishvavidyalaya Jaipur.

 

Editor’s Note

Notwithstanding the difference of opinion regarding the date of the Vedas and the entitlement of the Brahmana-texts to the status of the Veda, the Vedas represent the oldest literature of the world and the Brahmana-texts represent the earliest attempt to interpret that literature. Admittedly the interpretation of the Brähmana-texts is ritual- oriented but the latest researches have shown it beyond doubt that the Vedic rituals have a strong spiritual foundation. The Brãhmana-texts thus form a bridge between the karmakanda of the Vedas and jnanakanda of the Upanisads. This approach of the Brahmana-texts, providing a formidable bridge between the active and the spiritual life, is defined by the term vijnana by the Taittiriya Aranyaka Yajna, which is a Vedic ritual, is amplified by vijnana so as to bring out its hidden spiritual significance. The Brahmanas do it by means of art havada-vakyas, which explain the logic of a vidhi or prescription of the Vedic ritual.

It was on the basis of this vijnana aspect of the Brahmana-texts, that an eminent scholar of Jaipur, Pandit Madhusudan Ojha, wrote about a hundred works in chaste Sanskrit during the last century. Some of his important works, along with some other works written on the same line, have been surveyed in the present work. Not only did traditional stalwarts like Mahamahopadhyaya Pandit Giridhar Sharma Chaturvedi, Pandit Motilal Shastri and Svãmi Suijana Dass expressed their views following this line of approach, but modem scholars like Dr. V.S. Agrawal also devoted a large part of their scholarly works to the development of this school of thought.

In recent times Shri K.C. Kulish, the founder-editor of Rajasthan Patrika, a Hindi Daily, did a lot to propagate the above mentioned literature. Professor Dayanand Bhargava, an old friend of mine, came into contact with Shri K.C. Kulish and felt the need of presenting the essence of the vijnãna aspect of the Brahmana-texts through modern scientific research methodology. The present work embodies the result of his rigorously followed studies of the last two decades.

Dr. Bhargava has also been following the latest researches in the field of science along with his Vedic studies. Only the other day, he was talking about the efficacy of mantra by support of the scientific researches carried by a Japanese scholar, Masaru Emoto who wrote four volumes under the title the Hidden Messages of the water in which it has been shown how water responds to our words of praise and condemnation. If we speak in terms of praise to water it forms beautiful crystals when frozen but it we condemn it, it forms ugly crystals in a haphazard manner. It means that water, air, fire etc., which are profusely addressed in the Vedas are not blind to our prayers. Vedic mantras assume a new significance in the light of such findings.

In the present work such parallels as that of the famous formula with the definition of yajna as the process of inter change of consciousness and matter into each other have been frequently drawn. This and many other finding well documented with about 1000 quotations from the Vedic literature make the present work valuable not only for the orient lists but also the scientists who are interested such problems as tracing the origin of the universe.

The Brahmana texts are known for the obscurity of their philosophical expositions. It is not easy to decipher the recondite thoughts enshrined in them but what is heartening is that Prof. Dayanand Bhargava Bhargava’s has not only fathomed their depths by delving deep into these primary sources but has also presented his findings in a style which is at once fascinating and illuminating. Many western scholars like Fritof Capra have written copiously on these line but their writings are normally shorn of reference to the primary sources. Viewed from this standpoint Prof. Dayanand Bhargava’s work is a significant contribution to the cause of interpreting the Vedic thought in a modern idiom which scholars all over the world will find useful and interesting.

Needless to say that this work is very much relevant to the modern times as it propounds a holistic paradigm which is eco friendly based on concept of sustainable development which combines peace with prosperity for the whole humanity at a global level.

I am confident that this work will prove to be a welcome addition to the already existing literature of the East and the West on the Vedas.

 

Contents

 

Acknowledgements V
Scheme of Transliteration VII
Editor’s Note IX
Chapter One Introduction
An Overview of the Approach of the Vedas
 
The Mystery 3
Consciousness the Origin of the Universe 4
The Whole and the part 4
Esoteric style 5
The Divine Triad 6
The Divine Triad and the four Vedas 6
Trayi and Atharva Veda 6
The Duad of Agni and Soma 7
Symbolism the Vedas 8
The Tradition of the Brahmana Texts 9
Cosmos oriented Approach 10
The difficulty of terminology 10
The Model of nature 11
The Art of Living 11
Arya is not a race 12
Knowledge and action 13
Holistic Approach neglected 13
The Divine Science 14
Unity in Diversity 15
Mind and Matter 15
Creator and the creation 16
The Relation of the whole and its parts 16
One Becomes many 17
Four Quadruplet 17
Four Duads 18
Triads 19
The Process of Assimilation 19
The Seasons 20
The Cow 20
Our Bodies 22
The Philosophy of Dynamism 22
Desires 22
The Man 23
The Evolution 24
The Ends of Human life 26
The Five Layers at Micro and macro level 26
The Yajna and our life 27
Chapter Two
Harmony
29-43
The Vedic Ethos  
Worldly well being 31
Education 34
Family Life 34
The Cow 36
Harmony 36
Aryas 37
Pauranic Geography 39
Wars 39
Spiritualism 41
Morality 41
Monotheism 42
Conclusion 43
Chapter Three
Pioneers
45-78
A Survey of the representative Major works  
Brahmanas are the part and parcel of the Vedas 48
Two Portions of the Brahmanas 48
Neglect of Arthavada Portion 48
Condemnation of the Brahmanas 49
Holistic Approach of Modern Science and the Brahmanas 49
Works of Madhusudan Ojha 50
Works of Cosmology 50
Works on Ethics and rituals 51
Works of Giridhara Sharma Chaturvedi: A Disciple of Madhusudan Ojha 52
A Brief summary of Madhusuddan Ojha’s approach 52
The Essence of the four Vedas (Tattva-veda) 52
The Trinity 54
Becoming and being 54
The Universe 55
Macrocosm and Microcosm 55
Sacrifice at Macro level 56
Institutional Aspect of the Vedic view point 57
Shri V.s. Agrawala, Agra 1959 43
Published by 1972, (Second Edition) 66
Sparks from the Vedic fire by Prof. V.S. Agrawala (Benaras, 1962) 70
Before the beginning and after the end by Shri Rishi Kumar Mishra (New Delhi 2000) 75
Chapter Four
Four Vedas
79-100
The Meaning of the Nomenclature of the Vedas  
The Authority of Manu 82
The Evidence of the Brahmana Texts 82
The Position of Atharva Veda Vstrayl 83
Texts Human Creation but not the reality 85
All Pervasiveness of Trayl 86
Trayl in Space 86
Trayl in Territory 86
Trayl in Time 86
Two Formulas 86
Trayl in Dvijas 87
Extension of Trayl 87
Veda and Vedanta 87
Rgveda 88
Yajus 89
Samveda 91
Atharvaveda 96
Veda as Brahma 97
Chapter Five
Psychic Energies
101-128
Treatment of Vedic Devas Rsis, Chandas and Piraras  
Difference between Deva and Devata 103
Number of Devas 103
The Basis of Monotheism 104
The Basis of Polytheism 105
The Role of Trayl 105
Three Fold Division of thirty three days 106
Anthropomorphic Nature of Devas 106
The Characteristics of Devas 107
Agni 109
Vayu 111
Indra 113
Aditya 116
Indra 117
Dhata 118
Pusa 118
Mira Varuna 118
Aryama 118
Chandas 120
Rssis 123
Pitaras 126
Chapter Six
Divine Trinity
129-154
Mana, Prana and Vak  
The Concept of Purusa 131
The Relation of three Pususas 132
Rasa and Bala 134
Five Kalas of Avyaya 134
Prajapati 135
Mana 136
Prana 143
Prana and Vak 145
Vak 148
Vak as Agni 148
Vak As constituent of Atma 149
Vak as Prajapati 149
Vak in Five Fold Universe 150
Aksara Purusa 151
Principle of Movement 151
Five Kalas of Aksara 151
The Formation of womb 152
Ksara Purusa 153
Quintuplication 153
Chapter Seven
Micro Level
155-184
Self and life hereafter  
The Meaning of Atma 157
Micro and Macro 157
Vedic Terms 157
The Trinity 159
Trivrtkarana 159
Three Questions 161
The Concepts of Equality 161
Give and take 162
Divine Yajna and Human personality 162
Macro Level 163
The Question of Rights 163
Food and Personality 164
Five fold Personality 166
Gross Body or Annamayakosa 168
Pranamayakosa 168
Manomayakosa 169
Vijnanamayakosa 169
Anandamayakosa 171
Different Concepts of Self 172
Three Stages 173
The Transcendental Stage 174
Part II  
Life Hereafter 176
Re-Birth 176
Heaven 177
Liberation 178
Different Paths 180
Nerves Channels 182
Chapter Eight
The Origin of Universe
185-206
Brahmavada and ten theories of Purva-Paksa  
Vital Energies 188
Two Movements 189
Desires 190
The Birth of Devas 191
Penance 192
Ten theories 194
Sadvada Asadvada 195
Rajovada 197
Aparavada 200
Avaranavada 201
Ambhovada 202
Ahoratravada 203
Deva Vada 205
Samsaya Vada 205
Conclusion 205
Chapter Nine
Structure of Universe
Five Fold (Pancha-Parva) Universe
207-218
Three Kinds of Creation 209
Three Tier Universe 210
Stability in Movement 211
Five Tier Universe 211
Yajna in the Universe 213
Correspondence of the Universe 216
Movement in the Universe 217
Universe and the Man 217
Chapter Ten
Philosophy of Action
 
The Meaning of Yajna 221
Knowledge and Action 221
Unselfishness 222
Non Possessiveness 222
Essentiality of Karma 222
Creation As a Yajna 223
Five Fold Yajna 223
Liberation and Yajna 224
Another Five Fold Yajna 224
Modern Science and Yajna 226
Einstein and the process of Yajna A Comparison 226
Definition of Yajna by Rsi Aitareya 227
Consciousness in Modern Science 227
Process of Yajna according to Brahmana texts 228
The Role of will power 228
The Role of Vital powers 228
The Vedic Devas and Trayl Vidya 229
Psychology of Yajna 230
Trayl and the classical philosophy 230
Gosava Yajna 230
Cayana Yajna 231
Cit and Citis 231
Punasciti 232
Yajna in the body 232
Karma Yoga 233
Categories of Karmas 233
Tapa 235
Dana 235
Man and Morality 235
Chapter Eleven
Celestial Song
237-268
The Gita: Essence of the Vedas  
The Meaning of the Title of the Gita 240
What is the Meaning of Bhagavan 240
Detachment 240
Knowledge 240
Aisvarya 241
Dharma 241
What is Upanisad 241
What makes a Karma Kamya 242
Gita The Application 242
Classification of the Contents of the Gita 242
Twenty Four Upanisads of the Gita 243
The Higher and the lower Self 245
Two Alternatives 246
Sensuous Pleasures 246
Knowledge of the Immutable 246
Diversity because of limitation 246
Soul is free from modification 247
Obstacles and progress 247
Role of Intellect 247
Buddhi Yoga 248
The Witness 248
Attachment 248
The Nature of Desires 249
The Desire to create 249
Desires 249
Natural desires 250
Nature 250
Wishes of God 250
Concepts of Duty 250
All duties are Equal 251
Performance of duty is not a sin 251
Brahma and Ksatra 251
Injustice 252
Role of Punishment 252
Nature of Reality 252
Change the Aim of Action 253
Action and knowledge 254
Development 255
Education 257
What is Yoga 258
The Root cause of Misery 258
Extroversion and introversion 258
The Three Attitudes 259
Means of Success 259
Three Fold Karmas 259
Another Classification if Karmas 260
Karmas and Division of Life Span 260
Effect and Result of Karma 260
How Karmas Yield Their Results 261
Samskaras 261
Karma and Dharma 262
Yajna in the Nature 262
The Model of divine Way of Acting 263
Harmony 264
Three Bodies 264
Soul: The Source of Happiness 264
Enjoyments 265
Three Kinds of Openness 265
Gradation 265
Happiness of Openness 266
Three Layers of Purusa 266
Ksara Purusa 266
Aksara Purusa 267
Avyaya Purusa 267
Preference for Karma Yoga 268
Bhumodarka 268
Chapter Twelve
Epilogue
269-277
Indian Culture: The Holistic Approach of the Vedas  
Holistic Approach 271
Four ends of human life 272
Material Aspect 272
Trivarga 272
Summum Bonum of life 272
Four Asramas 273
Four Varnas 273
Four Vedas 274
Rgveda 274
Yajurveda 275
Samaveda 275
Apara and Para 276
Atharvaveda 276
Appendix One
The Space Time Continuum
279-303
An Introduction of the two Kalasuktas of the Atharvaveda  
Place of Kala 281
Kala and Mahakala 281
The Real View of Kala 282
Practical view 282
What is present 283
Natural Watches 283
Time And movement 284
Division of time 284
Life Span of Deva 284
Caturyuga 284
Life Span of Sun 286
Present Age of Sun 286
The Smaller Divisions of time 287
Beyond the Solar System 288
Pure Movement 288
Infinite Time Contains the practical time 288
Kala and Movement 289
Role of Kala 289
The Process of Manifestation illustrated 289
Another Role of Movement 290
Five Forms of Movement 290
Trinity of Time 290
The Relations of Time and Space 290
The Role of Chanda 292
Time Eats and We Eat Time 292
Two Forms of Samvatsara 292
Why the Movement is Circular 292
First Kala Sukta Explained 293
Second Kala Sukta Explained 300
Appendix Two 304-311
A Brief Survey of Works on Vedic Literature  
Works on Cosmology 305
Works on Ethics 305
Works on Vedas From Arya Samaja’s View Point 306
Works on the Philosophy of the Vedas 307
Aurobindo’s Approach 308
Vedas as the Source Book of Philosophy 309
Appendix Three 312-315
A Note on the Position of Atharvaveda
(from the introduction of Swami Surjan Dass of Sabda Veda, Compiled by Shri K.C. Kulish)
 
Bibliography 316-322

 

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