Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Philosophy > Hindu > Horizons of The Self in Hindu Thought (A Study for the Perplexed)
Displaying 123 of 2831         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Horizons of The Self in Hindu Thought (A Study for the Perplexed)
Pages from the book
Horizons of The Self in Hindu Thought (A Study for the Perplexed)
Look Inside the Book
Description
About the Book

There is a variety of competing ideas about the nature of self in the Hindu tradition. Efforts to bring them together under a unitary conception were underway for many centuries. Much of the eighteenth-and nineteenth- century Oriental scholarship and the latter-day popularist movements made considerable effort to obscure the complexity and diversity of the idea of the self and its horizon in the broad spectrum of Hindu beliefs.

This modest study discusses the different conceptions of the self, and answers questions such as what is the self? And where does the self come from? How does the personal self retain its identity over time and space? In answering these questions it draws from the Vedic texts, Upanisads and the Vedanta system, especially Advaita (non-dualism). It also looks at the Samkhya system and its radically different conception of the self, which varies considerably from that of Upanisadic formulation. Buddhist and latter-day criticisms of the Hindu positions on the self via the “neo-self” theory are discussed.

The book also addresses questions such as what happens to the self, what does it do? Where does it go? and where ought it go? discussing fate or destiny of the self in the context of karma, dharma, death and rebirth. Issues such as ends or goals towards which a person has to strive, realizing the fullest potential and purpose of the self, are well deliberated upon. Sankara’s concept of the self and critique of the non-self are also examined.

 

About the Author

Prof. Purushottama Bilimoria, PhD, is a Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies and a Senior Lecturer at Graduate Thelogical Union in Berkeley. He is a Chancellor’s Scholar and Visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkelwy (California, USA), an Honorary Professor at the Deakin University and Senior Fellow at the University of Melbourne in Australia.

 

Introduction

There is no one single idea of the self in the Hindu tradition. In fact, there is a variety of competing ideas of the nature of the self that tradition has had to deal with, often striving to bring them together under an unitary conception. And this is not achieved without some conceptual difficulties. Thus, the conception of self that emerges in the course of the reformulation in at least one prominent classical system, namely Vedanta, appears to be somewhat paradoxical, in that here the self is denied at one level, while at another level its existence is asserted. However, much of the eighteenth to nineteenth-century Oriental scholarship and the latter-day popularist neo-Hindu movements did much to obscure the complexity and diversity of the idea of the self and its horizon in the broad spectrum of Hindu beliefs, not to mention the broader field of Indian religious and philosophical discourses.

A Note on the Term ‘Hindu’

We must note at the very outset that the designation ‘Hinduism’ is itself a problematical one, for the simple reason that it is a more recent term intended, apart from other things, to separate and sharply distinguish the continuing strands of classical Brahmanism from Buddhism which grew out of and in reaction to the Brahmanical tradition in Greater India. But this way of naming, on the one hand, lends to suppress the variety of beliefs that persisted in the remnants of the Brahmanical tradition and, on the other hand, also blurs some fundamental points of comparability, if not convergence, between Hindu and Buddhist beliefs on a number of issues, not the least on the question of the self, its nature, fate and so on. Indeed, Indian philosophers often do not carve up their professional spheres into watertight compartments of Hindu, Buddhist and other philosophies in the context of their history, but rather consider these as distinct systems or traditions of thought within that global genre known as Indian philosophy.

Structure of the Text

The material in this text is divided into four major parts. The first two parts (A and B) discuss the different conceptions of the self. They are responses to questions such as What is the self? Where does the self come from? Part A explores some imaginative notions that emerge in the context of cosmological reflections recorded in the very early Brahmanical texts called the Vedas. Their development towards a more unitary conception in later texts, particularly the philosophical Upanisads, usually identified with the Vedanta system, is examined in some detail. Part B looks at a divergent system, namely samkhya, and its radically different conception of the self, which appears to be opposed to the Upanisadic formulation. Some remarks are made on how the latter conception relates to the Buddhist idea of no-self.

Parts C and D focus on questions such as ‘What happens to the self? What does it do? Where does it go? Where ought it go?’ In Part C, the discussion on the ‘fate’ or destiny of the self is taken up in the context of the concepts of karma (action), dharma (rules, norms,) death and rebirth. Part D concentrates on the issue of the ‘ends’ or goals towards which a person has to strive with a view to obliterating the sense of the self, or to realizing its fullest potential and purpose, or both, part E has a supplemental essay on Sankara’s concept of the self and non- self.

Methodological Remarks

The treatment that we follow here will, in part, be diachronic, i.e. historical, and, in part, synchronic, i.e. the conceptual deepening reached at various points in the historical deepening development. It will also be important to ground the otherwise abstract discussion in the more concrete context of the ‘life-world’ or living tradition of the people for whom these conceptions had or have some meaning, and which may determine their goals and purpose in life. In Part D we shall pay particular attention to the tensions and conflicts that arise between the ideal and real, between the conception of the unchanging, transcendental self and the realities of human life with its variegated challenges.

 

Contents

 

  Transliteration Ascheme ix
  Abbreviations x
  Introduction 1
Part A Self in Brahmanism: The Vedas and Upanisads 7
Part B The Samkhya Alternative 29
Part C Destiny of the Self: Karma, Rebirth and Eschatology 40
Part D Purusartha: The Human ?Kingdom of Ends 52
Part E On Sankara's Attempted Reconciliation of 'you' and 'I' 66
  Bibliography 98

 

Sample Pages








Horizons of The Self in Hindu Thought (A Study for the Perplexed)

Item Code:
NAN414
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2016
ISBN:
9788124608500
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch x 5.5 inch
Pages:
110 (6 B/W Illustrations)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 170 gms
Price:
$22.00
Discounted:
$17.60   Shipping Free
You Save:
$4.40 (20%)
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Horizons of The Self in Hindu Thought (A Study for the Perplexed)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 1428 times since 21st Mar, 2018
About the Book

There is a variety of competing ideas about the nature of self in the Hindu tradition. Efforts to bring them together under a unitary conception were underway for many centuries. Much of the eighteenth-and nineteenth- century Oriental scholarship and the latter-day popularist movements made considerable effort to obscure the complexity and diversity of the idea of the self and its horizon in the broad spectrum of Hindu beliefs.

This modest study discusses the different conceptions of the self, and answers questions such as what is the self? And where does the self come from? How does the personal self retain its identity over time and space? In answering these questions it draws from the Vedic texts, Upanisads and the Vedanta system, especially Advaita (non-dualism). It also looks at the Samkhya system and its radically different conception of the self, which varies considerably from that of Upanisadic formulation. Buddhist and latter-day criticisms of the Hindu positions on the self via the “neo-self” theory are discussed.

The book also addresses questions such as what happens to the self, what does it do? Where does it go? and where ought it go? discussing fate or destiny of the self in the context of karma, dharma, death and rebirth. Issues such as ends or goals towards which a person has to strive, realizing the fullest potential and purpose of the self, are well deliberated upon. Sankara’s concept of the self and critique of the non-self are also examined.

 

About the Author

Prof. Purushottama Bilimoria, PhD, is a Senior Research Fellow at the Oxford Centre for Hindu Studies and a Senior Lecturer at Graduate Thelogical Union in Berkeley. He is a Chancellor’s Scholar and Visiting Professor at the University of California, Berkelwy (California, USA), an Honorary Professor at the Deakin University and Senior Fellow at the University of Melbourne in Australia.

 

Introduction

There is no one single idea of the self in the Hindu tradition. In fact, there is a variety of competing ideas of the nature of the self that tradition has had to deal with, often striving to bring them together under an unitary conception. And this is not achieved without some conceptual difficulties. Thus, the conception of self that emerges in the course of the reformulation in at least one prominent classical system, namely Vedanta, appears to be somewhat paradoxical, in that here the self is denied at one level, while at another level its existence is asserted. However, much of the eighteenth to nineteenth-century Oriental scholarship and the latter-day popularist neo-Hindu movements did much to obscure the complexity and diversity of the idea of the self and its horizon in the broad spectrum of Hindu beliefs, not to mention the broader field of Indian religious and philosophical discourses.

A Note on the Term ‘Hindu’

We must note at the very outset that the designation ‘Hinduism’ is itself a problematical one, for the simple reason that it is a more recent term intended, apart from other things, to separate and sharply distinguish the continuing strands of classical Brahmanism from Buddhism which grew out of and in reaction to the Brahmanical tradition in Greater India. But this way of naming, on the one hand, lends to suppress the variety of beliefs that persisted in the remnants of the Brahmanical tradition and, on the other hand, also blurs some fundamental points of comparability, if not convergence, between Hindu and Buddhist beliefs on a number of issues, not the least on the question of the self, its nature, fate and so on. Indeed, Indian philosophers often do not carve up their professional spheres into watertight compartments of Hindu, Buddhist and other philosophies in the context of their history, but rather consider these as distinct systems or traditions of thought within that global genre known as Indian philosophy.

Structure of the Text

The material in this text is divided into four major parts. The first two parts (A and B) discuss the different conceptions of the self. They are responses to questions such as What is the self? Where does the self come from? Part A explores some imaginative notions that emerge in the context of cosmological reflections recorded in the very early Brahmanical texts called the Vedas. Their development towards a more unitary conception in later texts, particularly the philosophical Upanisads, usually identified with the Vedanta system, is examined in some detail. Part B looks at a divergent system, namely samkhya, and its radically different conception of the self, which appears to be opposed to the Upanisadic formulation. Some remarks are made on how the latter conception relates to the Buddhist idea of no-self.

Parts C and D focus on questions such as ‘What happens to the self? What does it do? Where does it go? Where ought it go?’ In Part C, the discussion on the ‘fate’ or destiny of the self is taken up in the context of the concepts of karma (action), dharma (rules, norms,) death and rebirth. Part D concentrates on the issue of the ‘ends’ or goals towards which a person has to strive with a view to obliterating the sense of the self, or to realizing its fullest potential and purpose, or both, part E has a supplemental essay on Sankara’s concept of the self and non- self.

Methodological Remarks

The treatment that we follow here will, in part, be diachronic, i.e. historical, and, in part, synchronic, i.e. the conceptual deepening reached at various points in the historical deepening development. It will also be important to ground the otherwise abstract discussion in the more concrete context of the ‘life-world’ or living tradition of the people for whom these conceptions had or have some meaning, and which may determine their goals and purpose in life. In Part D we shall pay particular attention to the tensions and conflicts that arise between the ideal and real, between the conception of the unchanging, transcendental self and the realities of human life with its variegated challenges.

 

Contents

 

  Transliteration Ascheme ix
  Abbreviations x
  Introduction 1
Part A Self in Brahmanism: The Vedas and Upanisads 7
Part B The Samkhya Alternative 29
Part C Destiny of the Self: Karma, Rebirth and Eschatology 40
Part D Purusartha: The Human ?Kingdom of Ends 52
Part E On Sankara's Attempted Reconciliation of 'you' and 'I' 66
  Bibliography 98

 

Sample Pages








Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Based on your browsing history

Loading... Please wait

Related Items

Self on Self (Bhagavan Ramana Answers)
Item Code: NAH332
$6.00$4.80
You save: $1.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Self-Restraint V. Self-Indulgence
by M.K. Gandhi
Paperback (Edition: 2007)
Navajivan Publishing House
Item Code: NAH043
$10.00$8.00
You save: $2.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Philosophy of Spirituality from Divided Self to Integrated Self
by H.B. Danesh
Paperback (Edition: 1998)
Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDK148
$27.50$22.00
You save: $5.50 (20%)
SOLD
Aparokshanubhuti or Self-Realization of Sri Sankaracharya (Shankaracharya)
by Swami Vimuktananda
Paperback (Edition: 2014)
Advaita Ashrama
Item Code: IDF820
$5.00$4.00
You save: $1.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Yoga of Dejection: Self beyond Identity Crisis
by SATYA NARAYAN DASA
Hardcover (Edition: 2000)
Jiva Institute, Vrindavan
Item Code: IDG277
$50.00$40.00
You save: $10.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Living Nonduality (Enlightenment Teachings of Self-Realization)
by Robert Wolfe
Paperback (Edition: 2017)
Zen Publications
Item Code: NAN357
$35.00$28.00
You save: $7.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Awakening - A Seven Step Practical Guide to Self Realization (With CD Inside)
by Yaron Etzion
Paperback (Edition: 2017)
Sri Sri Publications Trust
Item Code: NAN300
$25.00$20.00
You save: $5.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Paramaamrita - Pointers to Self Realization
by Ramesh Balsekar
Paperback (Edition: 2017)
Zen Publications
Item Code: NAN707
$20.00$16.00
You save: $4.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Self - Love: The Original Dream (Shri Nisargadatta Maharaj's Direct Pointers to Reality)
by Mohan Gaitonde
Paperback (Edition: 2017)
Zen Publications
Item Code: NAN844
$35.00$28.00
You save: $7.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Pratyabhijnahrdayam (The Secret of Self-Recognition)
Item Code: IDD577
$31.00$24.80
You save: $6.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Harnam Sethi's Journey to Self Discovery
by P S Wasu
Paperback (Edition: 2013)
Life Positive Pvt. Ltd
Item Code: NAN257
$20.00$16.00
You save: $4.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Ramana Maharshi and The Path of Self-Knowledge
Item Code: IDI857
$16.00$12.80
You save: $3.20 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Sure Ways to Self-Realization
Item Code: IDF178
$30.00$24.00
You save: $6.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Astavakragita (The Song of The Self Supreme)
Item Code: IDI721
$25.00$20.00
You save: $5.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

Excellent e-commerce website with the most exceptional, rare and sought after authentic India items. Thank you!
Cabot, USA
Excellent service and fast shipping. An excellent supplier of Indian philosophical texts
Libero, Italy.
I am your old customer. You have got a wonderful collection of all products, books etc.... I am very happy to shop from you.
Usha, UK
I appreciate the books offered by your website, dealing with Shiva sutra theme.
Antonio, Brazil
I love Exotic India!
Jai, USA
Superzoom delivery and beautiful packaging! Thanks! Very impressed.
Susana
Great service. Keep on helping the people
Armando, Australia
I bought DVs supposed to receive 55 in the set instead got 48 and was in bad condition appears used and dusty. I contacted the seller to return the product and the gave 100% credit with apologies. I am very grateful because I had bought and will continue to buy products here and have never received defective product until now. I bought paintings saris..etc and always pleased with my purchase until now. But I want to say a public thank you to whom it may concern for giving me the credit. Thank you. Navieta.
Navieta N Bhudu
I have no words to thank you and your company. I received the Saundarananda Maha Kavya that I have ordered from you few weeks ago. I hope to order any more books, if I will have a need. Thank you
Ven. Bopeththe, Sri Lanka
Thank you so much just received my order. Very very happy with the blouse and fast delivery also bindi was so pretty. I will sure order from you again.
Aneeta, Canada
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2018 © Exotic India