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Management by Values (Towards Cultural Congruence)
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Foreword

During the 1980s I studied and wrote about management and leadership. Like others, my perspective was exclusively Western. In search of a different perspective, I travelled to Indian in 1988 where Professor Chakraborty and I became acquainted. The luxury of the Grand Oberoi Hotel where we met stood in sharp contrast to the Calcutta surroundings and to the humble and wise professor.

Professor Chakraborty has studied and written much about management and leadership from the Indian perspective. The professor identifies the Indian perspective, ‘Indian Ethos’, as being self/spirit oriented versus the Western parading ego/matter oriented.

In his books Human Response in Organizations: Towards the Indian Ethos (1985); Managerial Effectiveness and Quality of Work life: Indian Insight (1987); and foundations of Managerial Work: Contribution from Indian Thoughts (1989), Professor Chakraborty makes a strong case for Indian Ethos.

I had an opportunity of exploring the Indian Ethos at first hand in the autumn of 1989. Professor Chakraborty invited me to attend and to be a guest lecturer at a one week seminar, ‘Managerial Effectiveness’ based on Indian Ethos, that he was conducting. The seminar was held at the Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta for executives from Indian Companies.

The seminar was very different from European and American seminars I had attended. Professor Chakraborty had designed the seminar to allow each participant an opportunity to experience the Indian Ethos. He achieved this through integration of insightful lectures, selected readings, meditation and silence. Three times a day we meditated for 45 minutes were times of silence. These experiences, although at first foreign to me, resulted in a deep inner learning far beyond that which any intellectual or rational experience could have provided. I became convinced that Professor Chakraborty had much insight to offer established Western thinking in the field of leadership.

In this book, Management by Values: Towards Cultural Congruence, Professor Chakraborty delivers his message of Indian Ethos even more profoundly than before. In a penetrating way he analyses the shortcomings of an ego/matter orientation and illuminates the ‘reality’ of the self/spirit orientation. He argues that ‘It is from the depth of inner silence that they [leaders] derive their power to vision, lead and build’.

A great contribution of this book is Professor Chakraborty’s use of reason to help people open themselves to spiritual experiences that can result in a renaissance of true leadership in business and society.

Professor Chakraborty exposes the tragedy of India losing contact with her roots by importing Western ideas of management and leadership. It is ironic that as the West begins to discover what the East has always known, the East is in danger of changing and forgetting. It is possible that this book will be remembered even more for its importance in influencing Indian rather than Western more for its importance in influencing Indian rather than Western leadership perspectives.

Preface

Management by Objectives was a book I wrote in 1976. Over succeeding years, through an extensive range of organizational studies, it struck me that despite the range of elegant, rational systematized, analytic approaches employed-MBO included-neither effective and concrete organizational results, nor a wholesome and humane quality of work-life had become manifest in Indian. It gradually began to dawn on me that the problem lay substantially in the weaknesses afflicting the sphere of human values. For instance, in MBO, setting the level of objectives, or evaluating performance against them, and all such activities inevitably get entangled in the human values implicit within the role-players. This book, therefore, bears the title Management by Values. It is offered as ‘right brain foundation for the ‘left brain rational-analytic approaches like MBO to yield their potential benefits in much greater measure than is evident now.

About the subtitle, ‘Towards Cultural Congruence’, there are at least two points to make. Why cultural congruence? Isn’t humanity the same after all? Would we not, by aspiring for cultural congruence, undermine our openness to nourishment from other cultures? The premise of this book, as of its predecessors, is that it is a reality that cultures and civilization do vary a lot at the empirical, manifest, vyavabarika level. World civilization appears to have evolved like an orchestra, with a great many instruments in the ensemble. Although the underlying notes struck on each may be identical, yet each instrument is necessarily played in its own distinctive style and technique for true for true response. This is the major reason for my concern with cultural congruence. Another is that when in the name of openness we merely imitate, it cannot promote a genuine and enduring development capable of earning respect and admiration for India in the world. This volume does not subscribe to the determinism that importing the latest technology also mandates the import of methods for handling the human side of organizations, except at a very superficial level. Moreover, our openness to other cultures does tend to be sham unless it is preceded by respectful openness to our own roots. Honest, sincere cultural ‘chauvinism’ (as many call cultural congruence) has a solid redeeming core in contrast to gullible aping of other cultures. Nor do I share the facile assumption that the modern mind is more enlightened in any real sense than the classical mind. The second point about ‘cultural congruence’ is the widespread bewilderment affecting the Indian managerial mind-both academic and practising-about the very existence of a definable Indian culture. The surface strife and diversity in our Epics and society on so many scores confounds them and they surrender the task of delving deeper to discover the unity that lies beneath. It is sad therefore that our great modern thinkers-Tagore, Vivekananda, Gandhi, Aurobindo, for example-who have devoted their lives to the betterment of our society almost before the very eyes of this generation are often summarily dismissed in a scanty line or two as being irrelevant and much else. This seems to be scourge that afflicts the contemporary Indian mind. Hence, in Chapter 8 of this book, after a close, sustained and respectful scrutiny and assimilation of the thoughts of these modern rishis of Indian, I offer readers the phrascsacro-secular symbiosis’ to sum up Indian culture. As I understand it, it is Indian’s mission to recreate this synthesis of the spiritual and material-the former showing the light to the latter-through each endeavour of hers. It seems to be a crucial failure of the modern mind not to comprehend the great truth about Indian, that her material affluence has always followed her spiritual efflorescence. To enact again and anew this unique script is our basic duty today. This is India’s prime relevance to the world. The new-found, yet old-time, ecological awareness’ syndrome of our days unmistakably points to the duty of expressing this symbiosis in all kinds of organizations. Of course, in the light of human values, ecology has to include both ‘physical ecology’ and mental ecology’. The call to India, therefore, is to foster and offer ‘manager-sadhaks,’ and similarly, we need teacher-sadhaks, politician-sadhaks and so on to cultivate genuine Indian values.

Another thing about culture in a highly pluralistic society like India’s needs to be said. By culture we do not mean here just the sum total of external customs, i.e. deshachara (local customs) and lokachara (folk customs), or manner of prayer and worship, or architecture and music, and music, or dress and food, or poetry and paining...Culture viewed in this way has undoubtedly gained wonderful enrichmen from the ceaseless currents flowing into India from various corners of the earth millennia. Pluralism at this exterior level is therefore patent. But remaining content with our understanding of Indian culture at this level alone is akin to missing the wood for the trees. Nor is the ‘historical-anthropological-sociological’ interpretation of it adequate or integral. Tagore, in an essay entitled The Centre of Indian Culture (1919) said: The main river of Indian culture has flowed in four streams-the Vedic, the Puranic, the Buddhist, and the Jain. It had its source in the heights of the Indian consciousness’ (emphasis added), and Tagore is recognized as the most universalized embodiment of the essence of Indian Culture which remains concentrated deep in the collective unconscious of its people. This assessment has been a major inspiration to me in my work.

Currently there is a legitimate and growing interest in discovering the ‘Indianness’ of Indian management. These efforts are based primarily on empirical studies of various categories of successful Indian enterprises, probable following the lead of many recent American books of this genre. The approach in this book is almost the reverse. Whatever Indians apparently do today-good or bad, successful or sloppy-is not intrinsic ‘Indianness’ The empirical or the practical cannot determine the ideal or the normative. Rather, the empirical shall be judged as wholesome and worthwhile only if it represents the tireless striving to express the ideal. This is what ‘management by values’ should mean. Viewed thus, I doubt whether any Indian organization today reflects quite [that ideal ‘Indianness’ which, as mentioned before, lies in ‘sacro-secular symbiosis’.

Contents

 

Foreword

vii

 

Preface

ix

1

Values for Indian Managers:

 
 

Roots in the Deep Structure

 

I

Values and Skills

1

II

Values System: Japan and China V. America

4

III

Values System: A Few Indian Examples

12

IV

Values from the ‘Deep Structure’

18

V

Conclusion: Closing of the Indian Mind

23

2

Anatomy of Ethico-Moral Management

 

I

The Ferment

28

II

Glimpses of the Indian Backstage

30

III

Science and Technology v. Ethics and Morals

34

IV

Ethics and Morals: Intellect or Emotions?

40

V

Ethics and Morals: Differentiation or Unity, Cause or Effect, Grabbing or Giving?

47

VI

On to the Pilgrim Path

54

VII

Conclusion: True Counsel

57

3

From Self To SELF: The Ascent from Pettiness to Dignity

 

I

The Setting

62

II

Values and Purity of Mind

63

III

Towards a Feel or Anubhuti of the Self

67

IV

What Next?-From Outsight to Insight’

70

V

The Indian Manager on Self v. SELF

78

VI

Conclusion: The Tryst with SELF for Teamwork

84

 

Appendix I Few Things About Yourself

88

 

Appendix II Analysis of Sample

89

4

Management-by- Values Programmes:

 
 

A Qualitative Appraisal

 

I

The Panorama

93

II

The Three Modules: Concepts and Practice

94

III

(Towards an) Assessment of Results from the Modules

102

IV

Conclusion: Towards Institutionalization

117

Appendix I:

Nirvanshatakam or Atmashatakam (Song of the Self)

120

Appendix II:

Questionnaires on the Evaluation of Values-System Modules

121

Appendix III:

A Letter from the Head of the Management Development Division of a very large Private enterprise

125

5

Socio-Cultural Change and the Manager’s Travails

 

I

The Groaning Engineer

126

II

Is Change Being Deified?

127

III

A Few Salient Aspects of Socio-Cultural

 
 

Change in India

128

IV

Conclusion: What Could Be Done

References

134

136

6

Social Values and Individual Attitudes:

 
 

Whither Behaviour?

 

I

Values: VAB or BAV?

 

II

The Spectrum of Changes: A Diver’s Eyeview

138

III

Conclusion: Sorting out the Cause and Effect Sequence

147

 

Appendix: Facilities to Officers

150

 

Reference

157

6

Social Values and Individual Attitudes:

 
 

Whither Behaviour?

 

I

Values: VAB or BAV?

138

II

The Spectrum of Changes: A Diver’s Eyeview

139

III

Conclusion: Sorting out the Cause and Effect Sequence

147

 

Appendix: Facilities to Officers

150

 

References

157

7

Detached Involvement: Work-Ethic and Ethics in Work

 

I

Work Commitment

159

II

Self- Actualization

160

III

De-Egoization

161

IV

De- Personification

162

V

Work Ethic v. Ethics-in-Work

163

VI

Constellation of Factors and Work-Results

165

VII

The Law of Sacrifice and Service Through Work

166

VIII

Karma-vada, karma-yoga, Ethics-in-work and Work Ethic

169

IX

Conclusion: Gita as Tranquilizer Energizer?

171

 

References

172

8

Sacro-Secular Symbiosis: India’s Vision of Humanism

 

I

Culture- specificity of Humanism

173

II

The Sacro-Secular Role Model

174

III

A Few Modern Experiments for Sacro-Secular Education by Indians

177

IV

Need for Sadhna

179

V

Counterwave to Technicism

180

VI

Sacro-Secular, Low-Entropy Society

181

VII

Physicists: What Have They Got to Say?

182

VIII

Conclusion: Why Lose the Paradise?

186

 

Reference

186

9

Hierarchism as an Organizational Value

 

I

The Issue

188

II

Hierarchy and Culture-Specificity

189

III

Theoretical Basis of Hierarchism

197

IV

Refurbished Hierarchism for India

202

V

Conclusion Humane Hierarchism for Ever

205

 

Reference

206

10

Re- Discovering Indian Psychology for Man-agers

 

I

The Crux of the Confusion

209

II

Indian Psychology of Bliss (Ananda)

211

III

The Means, Process and Culmination of ‘Anandology

215

IV

Anandology’: Its Relevance to Human Response Development

223

V

A Polemical Detour

230

VI

Conclusion: The Will to Ananda

240

 

Reference

242

11

Metaphysical Empiricism in Leadership and Institution-Building: The Role-Model of Swami Vivekananda

246

I

Metaphysical keynote: The First Principle

247

II

Vivekananda’s Insights into a Leader’s Oualities

249

III

Vivekananda’s Insights into Nation-Building

252

IV

Vivekananda’s Own Leadership Modelling

258

V

Conclusion: Towards Classical Love and Discipline

264

 

Reference

267

12

Mental Health: Rise from the ‘yayati Syndrome’ to ‘Atmic Poornatwa

 

I

The Impediments to Sound Mental Health

270

II

Counselling for Illness to Health-In the Mind

276

III

Conclusion: The Subjective Not the Objective

298

 

Appendix: LETTER FROM A STUDENT

300

 

Reference

301

 

Glossary

305

 

Index

311

 

Management by Values (Towards Cultural Congruence)

Item Code:
NAL435
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2011
ISBN:
9780195632187
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch x 5.5 inch
Pages:
340
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 320 gms
Price:
$25.00
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Foreword

During the 1980s I studied and wrote about management and leadership. Like others, my perspective was exclusively Western. In search of a different perspective, I travelled to Indian in 1988 where Professor Chakraborty and I became acquainted. The luxury of the Grand Oberoi Hotel where we met stood in sharp contrast to the Calcutta surroundings and to the humble and wise professor.

Professor Chakraborty has studied and written much about management and leadership from the Indian perspective. The professor identifies the Indian perspective, ‘Indian Ethos’, as being self/spirit oriented versus the Western parading ego/matter oriented.

In his books Human Response in Organizations: Towards the Indian Ethos (1985); Managerial Effectiveness and Quality of Work life: Indian Insight (1987); and foundations of Managerial Work: Contribution from Indian Thoughts (1989), Professor Chakraborty makes a strong case for Indian Ethos.

I had an opportunity of exploring the Indian Ethos at first hand in the autumn of 1989. Professor Chakraborty invited me to attend and to be a guest lecturer at a one week seminar, ‘Managerial Effectiveness’ based on Indian Ethos, that he was conducting. The seminar was held at the Indian Institute of Management, Calcutta for executives from Indian Companies.

The seminar was very different from European and American seminars I had attended. Professor Chakraborty had designed the seminar to allow each participant an opportunity to experience the Indian Ethos. He achieved this through integration of insightful lectures, selected readings, meditation and silence. Three times a day we meditated for 45 minutes were times of silence. These experiences, although at first foreign to me, resulted in a deep inner learning far beyond that which any intellectual or rational experience could have provided. I became convinced that Professor Chakraborty had much insight to offer established Western thinking in the field of leadership.

In this book, Management by Values: Towards Cultural Congruence, Professor Chakraborty delivers his message of Indian Ethos even more profoundly than before. In a penetrating way he analyses the shortcomings of an ego/matter orientation and illuminates the ‘reality’ of the self/spirit orientation. He argues that ‘It is from the depth of inner silence that they [leaders] derive their power to vision, lead and build’.

A great contribution of this book is Professor Chakraborty’s use of reason to help people open themselves to spiritual experiences that can result in a renaissance of true leadership in business and society.

Professor Chakraborty exposes the tragedy of India losing contact with her roots by importing Western ideas of management and leadership. It is ironic that as the West begins to discover what the East has always known, the East is in danger of changing and forgetting. It is possible that this book will be remembered even more for its importance in influencing Indian rather than Western more for its importance in influencing Indian rather than Western leadership perspectives.

Preface

Management by Objectives was a book I wrote in 1976. Over succeeding years, through an extensive range of organizational studies, it struck me that despite the range of elegant, rational systematized, analytic approaches employed-MBO included-neither effective and concrete organizational results, nor a wholesome and humane quality of work-life had become manifest in Indian. It gradually began to dawn on me that the problem lay substantially in the weaknesses afflicting the sphere of human values. For instance, in MBO, setting the level of objectives, or evaluating performance against them, and all such activities inevitably get entangled in the human values implicit within the role-players. This book, therefore, bears the title Management by Values. It is offered as ‘right brain foundation for the ‘left brain rational-analytic approaches like MBO to yield their potential benefits in much greater measure than is evident now.

About the subtitle, ‘Towards Cultural Congruence’, there are at least two points to make. Why cultural congruence? Isn’t humanity the same after all? Would we not, by aspiring for cultural congruence, undermine our openness to nourishment from other cultures? The premise of this book, as of its predecessors, is that it is a reality that cultures and civilization do vary a lot at the empirical, manifest, vyavabarika level. World civilization appears to have evolved like an orchestra, with a great many instruments in the ensemble. Although the underlying notes struck on each may be identical, yet each instrument is necessarily played in its own distinctive style and technique for true for true response. This is the major reason for my concern with cultural congruence. Another is that when in the name of openness we merely imitate, it cannot promote a genuine and enduring development capable of earning respect and admiration for India in the world. This volume does not subscribe to the determinism that importing the latest technology also mandates the import of methods for handling the human side of organizations, except at a very superficial level. Moreover, our openness to other cultures does tend to be sham unless it is preceded by respectful openness to our own roots. Honest, sincere cultural ‘chauvinism’ (as many call cultural congruence) has a solid redeeming core in contrast to gullible aping of other cultures. Nor do I share the facile assumption that the modern mind is more enlightened in any real sense than the classical mind. The second point about ‘cultural congruence’ is the widespread bewilderment affecting the Indian managerial mind-both academic and practising-about the very existence of a definable Indian culture. The surface strife and diversity in our Epics and society on so many scores confounds them and they surrender the task of delving deeper to discover the unity that lies beneath. It is sad therefore that our great modern thinkers-Tagore, Vivekananda, Gandhi, Aurobindo, for example-who have devoted their lives to the betterment of our society almost before the very eyes of this generation are often summarily dismissed in a scanty line or two as being irrelevant and much else. This seems to be scourge that afflicts the contemporary Indian mind. Hence, in Chapter 8 of this book, after a close, sustained and respectful scrutiny and assimilation of the thoughts of these modern rishis of Indian, I offer readers the phrascsacro-secular symbiosis’ to sum up Indian culture. As I understand it, it is Indian’s mission to recreate this synthesis of the spiritual and material-the former showing the light to the latter-through each endeavour of hers. It seems to be a crucial failure of the modern mind not to comprehend the great truth about Indian, that her material affluence has always followed her spiritual efflorescence. To enact again and anew this unique script is our basic duty today. This is India’s prime relevance to the world. The new-found, yet old-time, ecological awareness’ syndrome of our days unmistakably points to the duty of expressing this symbiosis in all kinds of organizations. Of course, in the light of human values, ecology has to include both ‘physical ecology’ and mental ecology’. The call to India, therefore, is to foster and offer ‘manager-sadhaks,’ and similarly, we need teacher-sadhaks, politician-sadhaks and so on to cultivate genuine Indian values.

Another thing about culture in a highly pluralistic society like India’s needs to be said. By culture we do not mean here just the sum total of external customs, i.e. deshachara (local customs) and lokachara (folk customs), or manner of prayer and worship, or architecture and music, and music, or dress and food, or poetry and paining...Culture viewed in this way has undoubtedly gained wonderful enrichmen from the ceaseless currents flowing into India from various corners of the earth millennia. Pluralism at this exterior level is therefore patent. But remaining content with our understanding of Indian culture at this level alone is akin to missing the wood for the trees. Nor is the ‘historical-anthropological-sociological’ interpretation of it adequate or integral. Tagore, in an essay entitled The Centre of Indian Culture (1919) said: The main river of Indian culture has flowed in four streams-the Vedic, the Puranic, the Buddhist, and the Jain. It had its source in the heights of the Indian consciousness’ (emphasis added), and Tagore is recognized as the most universalized embodiment of the essence of Indian Culture which remains concentrated deep in the collective unconscious of its people. This assessment has been a major inspiration to me in my work.

Currently there is a legitimate and growing interest in discovering the ‘Indianness’ of Indian management. These efforts are based primarily on empirical studies of various categories of successful Indian enterprises, probable following the lead of many recent American books of this genre. The approach in this book is almost the reverse. Whatever Indians apparently do today-good or bad, successful or sloppy-is not intrinsic ‘Indianness’ The empirical or the practical cannot determine the ideal or the normative. Rather, the empirical shall be judged as wholesome and worthwhile only if it represents the tireless striving to express the ideal. This is what ‘management by values’ should mean. Viewed thus, I doubt whether any Indian organization today reflects quite [that ideal ‘Indianness’ which, as mentioned before, lies in ‘sacro-secular symbiosis’.

Contents

 

Foreword

vii

 

Preface

ix

1

Values for Indian Managers:

 
 

Roots in the Deep Structure

 

I

Values and Skills

1

II

Values System: Japan and China V. America

4

III

Values System: A Few Indian Examples

12

IV

Values from the ‘Deep Structure’

18

V

Conclusion: Closing of the Indian Mind

23

2

Anatomy of Ethico-Moral Management

 

I

The Ferment

28

II

Glimpses of the Indian Backstage

30

III

Science and Technology v. Ethics and Morals

34

IV

Ethics and Morals: Intellect or Emotions?

40

V

Ethics and Morals: Differentiation or Unity, Cause or Effect, Grabbing or Giving?

47

VI

On to the Pilgrim Path

54

VII

Conclusion: True Counsel

57

3

From Self To SELF: The Ascent from Pettiness to Dignity

 

I

The Setting

62

II

Values and Purity of Mind

63

III

Towards a Feel or Anubhuti of the Self

67

IV

What Next?-From Outsight to Insight’

70

V

The Indian Manager on Self v. SELF

78

VI

Conclusion: The Tryst with SELF for Teamwork

84

 

Appendix I Few Things About Yourself

88

 

Appendix II Analysis of Sample

89

4

Management-by- Values Programmes:

 
 

A Qualitative Appraisal

 

I

The Panorama

93

II

The Three Modules: Concepts and Practice

94

III

(Towards an) Assessment of Results from the Modules

102

IV

Conclusion: Towards Institutionalization

117

Appendix I:

Nirvanshatakam or Atmashatakam (Song of the Self)

120

Appendix II:

Questionnaires on the Evaluation of Values-System Modules

121

Appendix III:

A Letter from the Head of the Management Development Division of a very large Private enterprise

125

5

Socio-Cultural Change and the Manager’s Travails

 

I

The Groaning Engineer

126

II

Is Change Being Deified?

127

III

A Few Salient Aspects of Socio-Cultural

 
 

Change in India

128

IV

Conclusion: What Could Be Done

References

134

136

6

Social Values and Individual Attitudes:

 
 

Whither Behaviour?

 

I

Values: VAB or BAV?

 

II

The Spectrum of Changes: A Diver’s Eyeview

138

III

Conclusion: Sorting out the Cause and Effect Sequence

147

 

Appendix: Facilities to Officers

150

 

Reference

157

6

Social Values and Individual Attitudes:

 
 

Whither Behaviour?

 

I

Values: VAB or BAV?

138

II

The Spectrum of Changes: A Diver’s Eyeview

139

III

Conclusion: Sorting out the Cause and Effect Sequence

147

 

Appendix: Facilities to Officers

150

 

References

157

7

Detached Involvement: Work-Ethic and Ethics in Work

 

I

Work Commitment

159

II

Self- Actualization

160

III

De-Egoization

161

IV

De- Personification

162

V

Work Ethic v. Ethics-in-Work

163

VI

Constellation of Factors and Work-Results

165

VII

The Law of Sacrifice and Service Through Work

166

VIII

Karma-vada, karma-yoga, Ethics-in-work and Work Ethic

169

IX

Conclusion: Gita as Tranquilizer Energizer?

171

 

References

172

8

Sacro-Secular Symbiosis: India’s Vision of Humanism

 

I

Culture- specificity of Humanism

173

II

The Sacro-Secular Role Model

174

III

A Few Modern Experiments for Sacro-Secular Education by Indians

177

IV

Need for Sadhna

179

V

Counterwave to Technicism

180

VI

Sacro-Secular, Low-Entropy Society

181

VII

Physicists: What Have They Got to Say?

182

VIII

Conclusion: Why Lose the Paradise?

186

 

Reference

186

9

Hierarchism as an Organizational Value

 

I

The Issue

188

II

Hierarchy and Culture-Specificity

189

III

Theoretical Basis of Hierarchism

197

IV

Refurbished Hierarchism for India

202

V

Conclusion Humane Hierarchism for Ever

205

 

Reference

206

10

Re- Discovering Indian Psychology for Man-agers

 

I

The Crux of the Confusion

209

II

Indian Psychology of Bliss (Ananda)

211

III

The Means, Process and Culmination of ‘Anandology

215

IV

Anandology’: Its Relevance to Human Response Development

223

V

A Polemical Detour

230

VI

Conclusion: The Will to Ananda

240

 

Reference

242

11

Metaphysical Empiricism in Leadership and Institution-Building: The Role-Model of Swami Vivekananda

246

I

Metaphysical keynote: The First Principle

247

II

Vivekananda’s Insights into a Leader’s Oualities

249

III

Vivekananda’s Insights into Nation-Building

252

IV

Vivekananda’s Own Leadership Modelling

258

V

Conclusion: Towards Classical Love and Discipline

264

 

Reference

267

12

Mental Health: Rise from the ‘yayati Syndrome’ to ‘Atmic Poornatwa

 

I

The Impediments to Sound Mental Health

270

II

Counselling for Illness to Health-In the Mind

276

III

Conclusion: The Subjective Not the Objective

298

 

Appendix: LETTER FROM A STUDENT

300

 

Reference

301

 

Glossary

305

 

Index

311

 

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Item Code: NAH540
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Inspirations (Values and Guidance for Students and Youths)
Item Code: NAJ552
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Indian Artisans – Social Institutions and Cultural Values
Item Code: IHL825
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The Value of Nature: Ecological Politics in India
Item Code: IDF646
$25.00$18.75
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Self, Society and Value: Reflections on Indian Philosophical Thought
by Shashiprabha Kumar
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
Vidyanidhi Prakashan, Delhi
Item Code: IDI125
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Business Sutra (A Very Indian Approach to Management)
by Devdutt Pattanaik
Hardcover (Edition: 2013)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAG512
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Readings in Sanskrit on Economics and Management
by V. R. Panchamukhi
Hardcover (Edition: 2012)
Rashtriya Sanskrit Sansthan
Item Code: NAM217
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25 Management Strategies for Delhi Metro's
by Anuj Dayal
Hardcover (Edition: 2013)
Delhi Metro Rail Corporation Ltd.
Item Code: NAF831
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Canakya On Management
by Ashok R. Garde
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Jaico Publishing House
Item Code: NAG457
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Everyday Vegetarian Cooking with Nutritional Details and Kitchen Management Tips
Deal 15% Off
by Meenakshi Kumar
Hardcover (Edition: 2007)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDK055
$55.00$35.06
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