Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Mandu
Pages from the book
Mandu
Look Inside the Book
Description
About the Book

The Hill-Fort of Mandu (22° 2' N and 75° 26' E) is situated about 35 kilometres south of Dhar, headquarter of the District of that name in Madhya Pradesh. The hill rises 633.7 m above the sea-level and is separated from the main plateau of Malwa by a deep ravine, called the Kakra Khoh, which encircles it on its west, north and east and finally vanishes into the Nimar plain in the south. It is irregular in shape, with prominently higher spur of Songadh projecting into the west and a narrow but deep 'chasm of the ravine, penetrating right into the heart of the hill, to its east. Its length, east-to-west, is about 6 to 8 kilometres, whilst its width, north-to-south, is between 5 to 6 kilometres.

The hill range is endowed with a very attractive natural scenery, which is at its best during the rainy season, when on all sides, it is clothed in green with a number of brooks and torrents, rushing down into the ravine winding about its sides below. The vegetation is at its best and most luxurious in the monsoons, the beauty of which is further enhanced by about a dozen lakes and ponds interspersed on its top. The hill may, therefore, very well be styled as the beauty spot of Malwa and this is probably the reason why the city, enclosed within its fort-walls, when in its prime, was called by the Muslim rulers as Shadiabad, 'the City of Joy'. Indeed, to an emperor with aesthetic sense, like Jahangir, there was 'no place so pleasant in climate and so pretty in scenery as Mandu in the rainy season.'

The most convenient rail-heads for Mandu are Mhow and Indore from where it is connected by good roads, via Dhar, the distance being 92 kilometres from Mhow and 98 kilometres from Indore.

Introduction

IT WAS IN THE MIDST OF AN INVITING NATURE THAT sometime early in the sixth century A D history was first made here and some sort of fortification was attempted by the political power of the day. A Sanskrit inscription, dated Vikrama Sarhvat 612 (A D 555), on the pedestal of a Jaina image of Adinatha found at Talanpur, near Kukshi in District Dhar, says that the image was installed in a temple of Pativanatha, in a locality called Tarapura inside Mandapa-Durga, by a merchant named Chandrasirhha Sha.1 Firishta, the celebrated Muhammadan historian, quotes a legend saying that in the days of Khusrau Parviz (A D 590-628) the fort was built by `Anand Deo Rajput of the tribe of Bies', a name which is not traceable amongst the historical personalities of the day so far known to us. The above inscrip-tion, however, leaves no doubt about the existence of the hill-fort under the name of Mariclapa-Durga in the middle of the sixth century. It must have been built some time before A D 555. About the origin of the Sanskrit name Maridapa-Durga there is no clue available at present. Its Prakrit or vernacular equivalent is `Mandava', a name by which it is still popularly called in the region. The word Maridava has been further corrupted to the present name of Mandu. Ma ,ndava is found so mentioned also in Persian histories of the medieval period.

During the next three centuries we hear nothing about the fort. It seems, in the tenth century, that the fort formed part, probably as a frontier outpost, of the Gujara- Pratibara empire of Kanauj. In an in-scription of Vikrama Sarhvat 1003 (A D 946), found at Pratapgadh in Rajasthan, referring to the reign of king Mahendrapala of this dynasty, it is stated that prince Madhava was then acting as the 'great feudatory' or 'great governor' at Ujjain and his com-mander-in-chief (balcidhikrita) Sri-Sarman, was carrying on the affairs of the state at Mandapika i.e., Mandu. It is likely that the fortifications were strengthened at this time, since there was then a standing threat of inva-sions from the powerful kings of the Deccan. During the clearance of debris at Dilawar Khan's mosque in the fort an inscription datable to this age has been found.

By the end of the tenth century the Paramaras rose to power in Malwa raising it to the status of an independent kingdom, with their capital first at Ujjain and later at Dhar, 35 kilometres north of Mandu.

**Contents and Sample Pages**





Mandu

Item Code:
NAR322
Cover:
PAPERBACK
Edition:
2004
Language:
English
Size:
9.00 X 5.50 inch
Pages:
68
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 0.13 Kg
Price:
$13.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Mandu
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 855 times since 30th Dec, 2019
About the Book

The Hill-Fort of Mandu (22° 2' N and 75° 26' E) is situated about 35 kilometres south of Dhar, headquarter of the District of that name in Madhya Pradesh. The hill rises 633.7 m above the sea-level and is separated from the main plateau of Malwa by a deep ravine, called the Kakra Khoh, which encircles it on its west, north and east and finally vanishes into the Nimar plain in the south. It is irregular in shape, with prominently higher spur of Songadh projecting into the west and a narrow but deep 'chasm of the ravine, penetrating right into the heart of the hill, to its east. Its length, east-to-west, is about 6 to 8 kilometres, whilst its width, north-to-south, is between 5 to 6 kilometres.

The hill range is endowed with a very attractive natural scenery, which is at its best during the rainy season, when on all sides, it is clothed in green with a number of brooks and torrents, rushing down into the ravine winding about its sides below. The vegetation is at its best and most luxurious in the monsoons, the beauty of which is further enhanced by about a dozen lakes and ponds interspersed on its top. The hill may, therefore, very well be styled as the beauty spot of Malwa and this is probably the reason why the city, enclosed within its fort-walls, when in its prime, was called by the Muslim rulers as Shadiabad, 'the City of Joy'. Indeed, to an emperor with aesthetic sense, like Jahangir, there was 'no place so pleasant in climate and so pretty in scenery as Mandu in the rainy season.'

The most convenient rail-heads for Mandu are Mhow and Indore from where it is connected by good roads, via Dhar, the distance being 92 kilometres from Mhow and 98 kilometres from Indore.

Introduction

IT WAS IN THE MIDST OF AN INVITING NATURE THAT sometime early in the sixth century A D history was first made here and some sort of fortification was attempted by the political power of the day. A Sanskrit inscription, dated Vikrama Sarhvat 612 (A D 555), on the pedestal of a Jaina image of Adinatha found at Talanpur, near Kukshi in District Dhar, says that the image was installed in a temple of Pativanatha, in a locality called Tarapura inside Mandapa-Durga, by a merchant named Chandrasirhha Sha.1 Firishta, the celebrated Muhammadan historian, quotes a legend saying that in the days of Khusrau Parviz (A D 590-628) the fort was built by `Anand Deo Rajput of the tribe of Bies', a name which is not traceable amongst the historical personalities of the day so far known to us. The above inscrip-tion, however, leaves no doubt about the existence of the hill-fort under the name of Mariclapa-Durga in the middle of the sixth century. It must have been built some time before A D 555. About the origin of the Sanskrit name Maridapa-Durga there is no clue available at present. Its Prakrit or vernacular equivalent is `Mandava', a name by which it is still popularly called in the region. The word Maridava has been further corrupted to the present name of Mandu. Ma ,ndava is found so mentioned also in Persian histories of the medieval period.

During the next three centuries we hear nothing about the fort. It seems, in the tenth century, that the fort formed part, probably as a frontier outpost, of the Gujara- Pratibara empire of Kanauj. In an in-scription of Vikrama Sarhvat 1003 (A D 946), found at Pratapgadh in Rajasthan, referring to the reign of king Mahendrapala of this dynasty, it is stated that prince Madhava was then acting as the 'great feudatory' or 'great governor' at Ujjain and his com-mander-in-chief (balcidhikrita) Sri-Sarman, was carrying on the affairs of the state at Mandapika i.e., Mandu. It is likely that the fortifications were strengthened at this time, since there was then a standing threat of inva-sions from the powerful kings of the Deccan. During the clearance of debris at Dilawar Khan's mosque in the fort an inscription datable to this age has been found.

By the end of the tenth century the Paramaras rose to power in Malwa raising it to the status of an independent kingdom, with their capital first at Ujjain and later at Dhar, 35 kilometres north of Mandu.

**Contents and Sample Pages**





Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Mandu (History | Books)

Mandu (Travel Guide)
Deal 20% Off
by Swati Mitra
Paperback (Edition: 2009)
Eicher Goodearth Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAF089
$17.50$14.00
You save: $3.50 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Monuments of India and the Indianized States: The Plans of major and Notable Temples, Tombs, Palace and Pavilions
Deal 20% Off
by Fredrick W. Bunce
Hardcover (Edition: 2007)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDI054
$90.00$72.00
You save: $18.00 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Mosques of The Indian Subcontinent (Their Development and Iconography)
Deal 12% Off
by Fredrick W. Bunce
Hardcover (Edition: 2008)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDK826
$57.00$50.16
You save: $6.84 (12%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A History of Early Vedanta Philosophy - Part Two
Item Code: IDE528
$52.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Indore - City Guide
by Swati Mitra
Paperback (Edition: 2008)
Eicher Goodearth Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAO727
$16.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Omkareshwar and Maheshwar (Travel Guide)
by Swati Mitra
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Eicher Goodearth Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAO877
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Art Shrines of Ancient India
by V.K. Subramanian
Hardcover (Edition: 2003)
Abhinav Publication
Item Code: IHL115
$52.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Roopmati (The Tragic Story of a Rajput Princess)
Deal 20% Off
by Jagjir Uppal
Paperback (Edition: 2010)
Amar Chitra Katha
Item Code: NAD306
$6.50$5.20
You save: $1.30 (20%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Mughal Romance
by Ghob Singh Verma
Paperback (Edition: 2007)
Prakash Books India Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IHL503
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A Vibrant Adventure (Travel Tales)
by Geeta Menon
HARDCOVER (Edition: 2017)
Children Book, Trust
Item Code: NAV263
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Unmissable India
Paperback (Edition: 2016)
Outlook Publishing Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAP197
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Along The Narmada (Travel Guide)
by Swati Mitra
Paperback (Edition: 2015)
Eicher Goodearth Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAO878
$21.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Romantic Holidays In India
by Vinod Mehta
Paperback (Edition: 2008)
Outlook Publishing Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAE077
$31.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
I love antique brass pieces and your site is the best. Not only can I browse through it but can purchase very easily.
Indira, USA
Je vis à La Martinique dans les Caraïbes. J'ai bien reçu votre envoi 'The ten great cosmic Powers' et Je vous remercie pour la qualité de votre service. Ce livre est une clé pour l’accès à la Connaissance de certains aspects de la Mère. A bientôt
GABRIEL-FREDERIC Daniel
Namaskar. I am writing to thank Exotic India Arts for shipping the books I had ordered in the past few months. As I had mentioned earlier, I was eagerly awaiting the 'Braj Sahityik Kosh' (3 volumes). I am happy to say that all the three volumes of it eventually arrived a couple of days ago in good condition. The delay is understandable in view of the COVID19 conditions and I want to thank you for procuring the books despite challenges. My best wishes for wellness for everyone in India,
Prof Madhulika, USA
Love your collection of books! I have purchased many throughout the years. I love you guys!
Stevie, USA
Love your products!
Jason, USA
Excellent quality and service, best wishes to you all.
James, UK
Thank you so much for your wonderful store and wonderful service. A Naga Kanya stat arrived yesterday. The sculpture was very well packaged, and it is very beautiful. I am very very happy with the statue and very grateful to your company for providing access to such lovely works of art. Thank you for providing truly beautiful objects and for providing great service. All the very best to you,
Jigme, Canada
Thank you! You guys saved me... there were no other options online for the book I purchased today that I needed for a specific course. So thank you for carrying the book and the easy purchase process. I look forward to receiving the books.
Amanda, USA
Great selection of Books Timely delivery
Ed, USA
Namaste Exotic India Art. Thank you so much for the beautiful statues. Absolutely stunning craftsmanship. I am very grateful and blessed to have such beautiful artworks in my home.
Stephanie, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2020 © Exotic India