Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > History > The Social Space of Language (Vernacular Culture in British Colonial Punjab)
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
The Social Space of Language (Vernacular Culture in British Colonial Punjab)
The Social Space of Language (Vernacular Culture in British Colonial Punjab)
Description
About the Book

This rich cultural history set in Punjab examines a little-studied body of popular literature to illustrate both the durability of a vernacular literary tradition and the limits of colonial dominance in British India.

Farina Mir asks how qisse, a vibrant genre of epics and romances, flourished in colonial Punjab despite British efforts to marginalize the Punjabi language. The topics she explores include Punjabi linguistic practices, print and performance, and the symbolic content of qisse.

She finds that although the British denied Punjabi language and literature almost all forms of state patronage, the resilience of qisse came from its old but dynamic corpus of stories, its representations of place, and the moral sensibility that suffused the genre.

This multidisciplinary study reframes inquiry into cultural formations in latecolonial north India away from a focus on religious communal identities and nationalist politics and towards a widespread, ecumenical, and place-centred poetics of belonging in the region.

About the Author

Farina Mir is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Michigan.

Introduction

The following story has been circulating in northwest India for at least the past four hundred years: A young man named Dhido sets out from his village Takht Hazara on an epic journey in search of the renowned beauty named Hir. Through trials and tribulations, he makes his way to Hir's hometown of [hang, where the two fall in love at first sight. Their love blossoms on the banks of the Chenab River, where Ranjha (as Dhido is always called) takes cattle to pasture each day, Hir's father having hired him-at her suggestion-as a cowherd. Hir and Ranjhas idyll is soon interrupted, however, when Hir's family learns of her liaison. Her parents reject Ranjha as a suitor for their daughter because of his low-status occupation and they betroth Hir to Seido Khera, a bridegroom Hir's father considers more appropriate to his family's landlord status. Hir is forcibly married to Khera but refuses to consummate her marriage, and Ranjha makes his way, disguised as a yogi, to her married home. In this disguise, Ranjha is able to contact Hir and the two elope. The Kheras pursue the lovers and in most renditions of this tale commonly known as Hir-Ranjha, or simply as Hir, the two die for their love.

Hir-Ranjha-part epic, part romance, and almost certainly fictional-has circulated orally and textually for centuries in north India, principally in the Punjab (map 1). Its longevity alone is not what makes this tale noteworthy, however, given that epics such as the Mahabharata have circulated in South Asia (and beyond) for millennia. What makes Hir-Ranjha particularly compelling is that this ostensibly simple love story surfaces repeatedly in Punjab's history in places one would least expect to find it or any other love story. For example, it is embedded in Ganesh Dass Char Bagh-i Punjab, a Persian-language history of the Punjab from earliest antiquity through the period of Sikh sovereignty (1799-1849). Written in 1849 as the English East India Company annexed the Sikh kingdom of Lahore and transformed its territories into the colonial Punjab province, the Char Bagh-i Punjab is primarily a political history of the establishment, decline, and fall of Sikh rule in the region, along with a detailed account of many of the area's towns, cities, and villages.' Nestled in the middle of Dass work is an account of Hir-Ranjha alongside other fictional love stories, including Sohni-Mahival and Mirza-Sahiban. Why did Ganesh Das find Hir-Ranjha, and the Punjabi-language qissa (epic-romance; pI. qisse) tradition, to which all three romances belong, relevant to writing the region's history?

Many years later, in a very different setting, an Indian revolutionary stood trial for the murder of Michael O'Dwyer, who had been lieutenant-governor of the Punjab in 1919 when the Jallianwala Bagh massacre took place.' Today this revolutionary is popularly known by his given name, Udham Singh, but while in custody he gave his name as Ram Mohammad Singh Azad, a name that invoked the three major religious communities of the Punjab-Hindu, Muslim, and Sikh-as well as his anticolonial sentiment (azad means "free"). At his trial in England in April 1940, Udham Singh asked to take the required oath on Hir Waris, an eighteenth century rendition of Hir-Ranjha by the poet Waris Shah, which he had requested from a friend while in jail." Why did Udharn Singh-Ram Muhammad Singh Azad want to swear on this Punjabi epic-romance in place of religious scripture? What authority was vested in the romance of Hir and Ranjha for this political revolutionary?

In 1947, the British Indian province of Punjab was divided between the newly independent nation-states of India and Pakistan. Partitioned along ostensibly religious lines, the Punjab was mired in religious violence in which at least one million people were killed. The poet Amrita Pritam (b. 1919) fled Lahore for Delhi in 1947 and expressed through her poetry the anguish caused by partition and its attendant violence. Her "To Waris Shah" is perhaps the most famous Punjabi poem of the twentieth century. It is an exceptionally vivid and evocative tableau of the events of 1947:

Today I call on Waris Shah-from beyond the grave-speak! And turn, today, a new page in the Book of Love!

Once wept a daughter of the Punjab [Hir], your pen unleashed a million cries. Today millions of them weep, and to you, Waris Shah, they say:

o sympathizer of sufferers! Rise, and look at your Punjab!

Today corpses lie in the thickets and full of blood is the Chenab [River]. Somebody mixed poison into the five rivers,

And those waters watered the earth.

Lost is the flute where once sounded the pipings oflove. Ranjha and his kind have forgotten how to play.

Blood upon the earth has even seeped into graves. Love's princesses cry today in their mausoleums.

Today where can we find another Waris Shah?

Today I call on Waris Shah-from out of your grave-speak! And turn today a new page of the Book of Love!"

In evoking the violence and tragedy of Punjab's partition, Amrita Pritam turned to Waris Shah, the eighteenth-century qissa poet whose Hir-Ranjha continues to enthrall audiences to this day. Why did Pritam use Hir-Ranjha as a metaphor in her lament on the tragedy of Punjab's partition in 1947?

The narrative Hir-Ranjha and its principle genre, the qissa, are both deeply embedded in Punjab's history, as these examples suggest. The qissa was a leading genre of Punjabi literary production from the seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries sand Hir-Ranjha was among its most popular texts. Punjabi qisse served as both high literature and popular entertainment, and were widely accessible due to their being composed in a vernacular language and disseminated through oral performance and printed media. The examples above also indicate that qisse functioned as more than literary texts, and more than forms of popular entertainment. Ganesh Dass history, Udham Singh's actions, and Amrita Pritam's poem suggest that the qissa-and Hir-Ranjha in particular-was central to constructing and narrating historical imaginations in colonial Punjab.

This book is a study of Punjabi language literary traditions during the colonial period (1849-1947), with a particular focus on the qissa. Punjabi literary culture was particularly vibrant in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, marked by an abundance of original literary compositions, a burgeoning print culture, and ubiquitous oral performances. Syad Muhammad Latif's 1892 history of Lahore provides an indication of this vitality, describing the sounds cape of a Punjabi city street in which "young people. recite [Punjabi] epic and other poetry, or sing songs descriptive of love or intrigue," Latif's remarks give little indication of how the colonial state attempted to marginalize Punjabi through policies that denied the language and its literature almost all forms of state patronage (something taken up in chapter 1). Despite those policies, however, Punjabi, both as a colloquial language and a literary tradition, thrived during the colonial period (map 2).7

Punjabi's survival and continuous vitality through the colonial period signals a discernible limit to colonial dominance in British India. Mapping the limits of the colonial state by tracing the resilience of a Punjabi cultural formation is one of my critical objectives, and the historical dynamic between the Punjabi language and the colonial state is centrally important to the arguments presented here. Although some scholars have chosen to read the Punjabi language's survival as a mode of Indian resistance to colonialism," my approach in this book emphasizes resilience over resistance by showing that Punjabi literary culture operated at considerable remove from colonial institutions and venues. Indeed, I argue that Punjabi literary culture enjoyed relative independence from the colonial state, particularly vis-avis certain other Indian vernacular languages such as Hindi, Urdu, and Bengali.' This relative independence allowed greater scope for continuity with precolonial practices. Punjabi literary culture offers, therefore, a particular instance of stability through a period usually marked for its ruptures, as people and institutions traversed the divide between pre-colonial and colonial rule. In examining this continuity, the chapters that follow concentrate on how a regional literary tradition was kept vibrant and socially meaningful despite the profound transformations taking place in the institutional sites of its production and the social milieus of its reception.

These transformations occurred largely as a result of colonialism, and language was a key site of colonial intervention. It was also a site where colonial officials felt sure of their ability to effect change. When asked in 1863 about the language practices of the people in his Punjab division (a subprovincial administrative unit), one British divisional commissioner proclaimed, "The Punjabee [language] itself is dying OUFIO His conviction that colonial policies would precipitate this demise, that they would bring about the death of a language, were misplaced, however, for nothing of the sort happened. Throughout the colonial period, Punjabi language and literature were robust and they remain so today. Reading evidence of the limits of colonial rule in Punjabi's resilience is one aspect of a more complicated history, however. Why did colonial policy not cause Punjabi to atrophy? What sustained the language and its literary traditions throughout the colonial period?

At the broadest level, the answer to these questions is that this cultural formation's pragmatic engagements with colonial institutions were far less important than the affective attachments its adherents had established with a place and with an old but dynamic corpus of stories. These attachments were produced, in part, through the pleasures of composing, performing, reading, and listening to Punjabi literature. But pleasure alone did not preserve this tradition. Punjabi literature's survival also hinged on a distinctive array of devotional practices, social relations, vocations, and commerce that accompanied its production and circulation from the seventeenth through the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Equally important was a continued commitment on behalf of composers, performers, readers, and listeners to the moral sensibilities that suffused a key genre of this literature, the qissa. Punjabi qisse present a widespread, religiously plural, and placecentered poetics of belonging, strong enough and deeply embedded enough in society to withstand well-organized efforts to dismiss outright the language and its literature. Fundamental to a historical understanding of qisse is that this tradition was the focal point of what I will call a Punjabi literary formation: those individuals who shared the practices of producing, circulating, performing, and consuming Punjabi literary texts. For this formation, the qissa was a key site for the construction, contestation, and articulation of a particular historical imagination. By analyzing the qissa through the colonial period, with its pre-colonial history as an important reference, we can analyze the extent to which colonialism shaped and transformed the literary formation's historical imagination.

The history of the qissa and the Punjabi literary formation for which it was a focal point also allows for a reconsideration of two fundamental aspects of South Asian historiography. First, the vitality of the Punjabi qissa tradition in the colonial period, despite predictions of its imminent demise, forces a re evaluation of the nature and extent of colonial power in British India. Not only did the British deny patronage to the Punjabi language, they actively promoted another vernacular language in the Punjab: Urdu. Their efforts to change the linguistic and literary practices of the region's inhabitants were only partially successful. Though Urdu became an important language of literary production and the principal language of Punjab's incipient public sphere, Punjabi continued to be the main colloquial language in the province and Punjabi literary activity not only continued unabated, but may even have enjoyed a resurgence during the colonial period. Second, this history redirects inquiry into late nineteenth and early twentieth-century cultural formations in north India away from a focus on religious communal identities and nationalist politics-the dominant emphases in the present historiography-to analyze a set of practices and ideas that Punjab's inhabitants shared, no matter what their religious persuasion, which were not easily assimilated to nationalist

Contents

List of Illustrationsvii
Acknowledgmentsix
A Note on Translation, Transliteration, and Use of Foreign Termsxiii
Introduction1
1Forging a Language Policy27
2Puajabi Print Culture62
3A Punjabi Literary Formation91
4Place and Personhood123
5Piety and Devotion150
Conclusion183
Appendix A. Colonial-Era Hir-Ranjha Texts Consulted195
Appendix B. Punjabi Newspapers, 1880-1905203
Appendix C. Punjabi Books Published Prior to 1867206
Notes209
Bibliography245
Index271

Sample Pages

















The Social Space of Language (Vernacular Culture in British Colonial Punjab)

Item Code:
NAG013
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2010
Publisher:
ISBN:
9788178243078
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
292 (14 B/W Illustrations)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 414 gms
Price:
$40.00
Discounted:
$30.00   Shipping Free
You Save:
$10.00 (25%)
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
The Social Space of Language (Vernacular Culture in British Colonial Punjab)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 2706 times since 7th Mar, 2016
About the Book

This rich cultural history set in Punjab examines a little-studied body of popular literature to illustrate both the durability of a vernacular literary tradition and the limits of colonial dominance in British India.

Farina Mir asks how qisse, a vibrant genre of epics and romances, flourished in colonial Punjab despite British efforts to marginalize the Punjabi language. The topics she explores include Punjabi linguistic practices, print and performance, and the symbolic content of qisse.

She finds that although the British denied Punjabi language and literature almost all forms of state patronage, the resilience of qisse came from its old but dynamic corpus of stories, its representations of place, and the moral sensibility that suffused the genre.

This multidisciplinary study reframes inquiry into cultural formations in latecolonial north India away from a focus on religious communal identities and nationalist politics and towards a widespread, ecumenical, and place-centred poetics of belonging in the region.

About the Author

Farina Mir is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Michigan.

Introduction

The following story has been circulating in northwest India for at least the past four hundred years: A young man named Dhido sets out from his village Takht Hazara on an epic journey in search of the renowned beauty named Hir. Through trials and tribulations, he makes his way to Hir's hometown of [hang, where the two fall in love at first sight. Their love blossoms on the banks of the Chenab River, where Ranjha (as Dhido is always called) takes cattle to pasture each day, Hir's father having hired him-at her suggestion-as a cowherd. Hir and Ranjhas idyll is soon interrupted, however, when Hir's family learns of her liaison. Her parents reject Ranjha as a suitor for their daughter because of his low-status occupation and they betroth Hir to Seido Khera, a bridegroom Hir's father considers more appropriate to his family's landlord status. Hir is forcibly married to Khera but refuses to consummate her marriage, and Ranjha makes his way, disguised as a yogi, to her married home. In this disguise, Ranjha is able to contact Hir and the two elope. The Kheras pursue the lovers and in most renditions of this tale commonly known as Hir-Ranjha, or simply as Hir, the two die for their love.

Hir-Ranjha-part epic, part romance, and almost certainly fictional-has circulated orally and textually for centuries in north India, principally in the Punjab (map 1). Its longevity alone is not what makes this tale noteworthy, however, given that epics such as the Mahabharata have circulated in South Asia (and beyond) for millennia. What makes Hir-Ranjha particularly compelling is that this ostensibly simple love story surfaces repeatedly in Punjab's history in places one would least expect to find it or any other love story. For example, it is embedded in Ganesh Dass Char Bagh-i Punjab, a Persian-language history of the Punjab from earliest antiquity through the period of Sikh sovereignty (1799-1849). Written in 1849 as the English East India Company annexed the Sikh kingdom of Lahore and transformed its territories into the colonial Punjab province, the Char Bagh-i Punjab is primarily a political history of the establishment, decline, and fall of Sikh rule in the region, along with a detailed account of many of the area's towns, cities, and villages.' Nestled in the middle of Dass work is an account of Hir-Ranjha alongside other fictional love stories, including Sohni-Mahival and Mirza-Sahiban. Why did Ganesh Das find Hir-Ranjha, and the Punjabi-language qissa (epic-romance; pI. qisse) tradition, to which all three romances belong, relevant to writing the region's history?

Many years later, in a very different setting, an Indian revolutionary stood trial for the murder of Michael O'Dwyer, who had been lieutenant-governor of the Punjab in 1919 when the Jallianwala Bagh massacre took place.' Today this revolutionary is popularly known by his given name, Udham Singh, but while in custody he gave his name as Ram Mohammad Singh Azad, a name that invoked the three major religious communities of the Punjab-Hindu, Muslim, and Sikh-as well as his anticolonial sentiment (azad means "free"). At his trial in England in April 1940, Udham Singh asked to take the required oath on Hir Waris, an eighteenth century rendition of Hir-Ranjha by the poet Waris Shah, which he had requested from a friend while in jail." Why did Udharn Singh-Ram Muhammad Singh Azad want to swear on this Punjabi epic-romance in place of religious scripture? What authority was vested in the romance of Hir and Ranjha for this political revolutionary?

In 1947, the British Indian province of Punjab was divided between the newly independent nation-states of India and Pakistan. Partitioned along ostensibly religious lines, the Punjab was mired in religious violence in which at least one million people were killed. The poet Amrita Pritam (b. 1919) fled Lahore for Delhi in 1947 and expressed through her poetry the anguish caused by partition and its attendant violence. Her "To Waris Shah" is perhaps the most famous Punjabi poem of the twentieth century. It is an exceptionally vivid and evocative tableau of the events of 1947:

Today I call on Waris Shah-from beyond the grave-speak! And turn, today, a new page in the Book of Love!

Once wept a daughter of the Punjab [Hir], your pen unleashed a million cries. Today millions of them weep, and to you, Waris Shah, they say:

o sympathizer of sufferers! Rise, and look at your Punjab!

Today corpses lie in the thickets and full of blood is the Chenab [River]. Somebody mixed poison into the five rivers,

And those waters watered the earth.

Lost is the flute where once sounded the pipings oflove. Ranjha and his kind have forgotten how to play.

Blood upon the earth has even seeped into graves. Love's princesses cry today in their mausoleums.

Today where can we find another Waris Shah?

Today I call on Waris Shah-from out of your grave-speak! And turn today a new page of the Book of Love!"

In evoking the violence and tragedy of Punjab's partition, Amrita Pritam turned to Waris Shah, the eighteenth-century qissa poet whose Hir-Ranjha continues to enthrall audiences to this day. Why did Pritam use Hir-Ranjha as a metaphor in her lament on the tragedy of Punjab's partition in 1947?

The narrative Hir-Ranjha and its principle genre, the qissa, are both deeply embedded in Punjab's history, as these examples suggest. The qissa was a leading genre of Punjabi literary production from the seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries sand Hir-Ranjha was among its most popular texts. Punjabi qisse served as both high literature and popular entertainment, and were widely accessible due to their being composed in a vernacular language and disseminated through oral performance and printed media. The examples above also indicate that qisse functioned as more than literary texts, and more than forms of popular entertainment. Ganesh Dass history, Udham Singh's actions, and Amrita Pritam's poem suggest that the qissa-and Hir-Ranjha in particular-was central to constructing and narrating historical imaginations in colonial Punjab.

This book is a study of Punjabi language literary traditions during the colonial period (1849-1947), with a particular focus on the qissa. Punjabi literary culture was particularly vibrant in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, marked by an abundance of original literary compositions, a burgeoning print culture, and ubiquitous oral performances. Syad Muhammad Latif's 1892 history of Lahore provides an indication of this vitality, describing the sounds cape of a Punjabi city street in which "young people. recite [Punjabi] epic and other poetry, or sing songs descriptive of love or intrigue," Latif's remarks give little indication of how the colonial state attempted to marginalize Punjabi through policies that denied the language and its literature almost all forms of state patronage (something taken up in chapter 1). Despite those policies, however, Punjabi, both as a colloquial language and a literary tradition, thrived during the colonial period (map 2).7

Punjabi's survival and continuous vitality through the colonial period signals a discernible limit to colonial dominance in British India. Mapping the limits of the colonial state by tracing the resilience of a Punjabi cultural formation is one of my critical objectives, and the historical dynamic between the Punjabi language and the colonial state is centrally important to the arguments presented here. Although some scholars have chosen to read the Punjabi language's survival as a mode of Indian resistance to colonialism," my approach in this book emphasizes resilience over resistance by showing that Punjabi literary culture operated at considerable remove from colonial institutions and venues. Indeed, I argue that Punjabi literary culture enjoyed relative independence from the colonial state, particularly vis-avis certain other Indian vernacular languages such as Hindi, Urdu, and Bengali.' This relative independence allowed greater scope for continuity with precolonial practices. Punjabi literary culture offers, therefore, a particular instance of stability through a period usually marked for its ruptures, as people and institutions traversed the divide between pre-colonial and colonial rule. In examining this continuity, the chapters that follow concentrate on how a regional literary tradition was kept vibrant and socially meaningful despite the profound transformations taking place in the institutional sites of its production and the social milieus of its reception.

These transformations occurred largely as a result of colonialism, and language was a key site of colonial intervention. It was also a site where colonial officials felt sure of their ability to effect change. When asked in 1863 about the language practices of the people in his Punjab division (a subprovincial administrative unit), one British divisional commissioner proclaimed, "The Punjabee [language] itself is dying OUFIO His conviction that colonial policies would precipitate this demise, that they would bring about the death of a language, were misplaced, however, for nothing of the sort happened. Throughout the colonial period, Punjabi language and literature were robust and they remain so today. Reading evidence of the limits of colonial rule in Punjabi's resilience is one aspect of a more complicated history, however. Why did colonial policy not cause Punjabi to atrophy? What sustained the language and its literary traditions throughout the colonial period?

At the broadest level, the answer to these questions is that this cultural formation's pragmatic engagements with colonial institutions were far less important than the affective attachments its adherents had established with a place and with an old but dynamic corpus of stories. These attachments were produced, in part, through the pleasures of composing, performing, reading, and listening to Punjabi literature. But pleasure alone did not preserve this tradition. Punjabi literature's survival also hinged on a distinctive array of devotional practices, social relations, vocations, and commerce that accompanied its production and circulation from the seventeenth through the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Equally important was a continued commitment on behalf of composers, performers, readers, and listeners to the moral sensibilities that suffused a key genre of this literature, the qissa. Punjabi qisse present a widespread, religiously plural, and placecentered poetics of belonging, strong enough and deeply embedded enough in society to withstand well-organized efforts to dismiss outright the language and its literature. Fundamental to a historical understanding of qisse is that this tradition was the focal point of what I will call a Punjabi literary formation: those individuals who shared the practices of producing, circulating, performing, and consuming Punjabi literary texts. For this formation, the qissa was a key site for the construction, contestation, and articulation of a particular historical imagination. By analyzing the qissa through the colonial period, with its pre-colonial history as an important reference, we can analyze the extent to which colonialism shaped and transformed the literary formation's historical imagination.

The history of the qissa and the Punjabi literary formation for which it was a focal point also allows for a reconsideration of two fundamental aspects of South Asian historiography. First, the vitality of the Punjabi qissa tradition in the colonial period, despite predictions of its imminent demise, forces a re evaluation of the nature and extent of colonial power in British India. Not only did the British deny patronage to the Punjabi language, they actively promoted another vernacular language in the Punjab: Urdu. Their efforts to change the linguistic and literary practices of the region's inhabitants were only partially successful. Though Urdu became an important language of literary production and the principal language of Punjab's incipient public sphere, Punjabi continued to be the main colloquial language in the province and Punjabi literary activity not only continued unabated, but may even have enjoyed a resurgence during the colonial period. Second, this history redirects inquiry into late nineteenth and early twentieth-century cultural formations in north India away from a focus on religious communal identities and nationalist politics-the dominant emphases in the present historiography-to analyze a set of practices and ideas that Punjab's inhabitants shared, no matter what their religious persuasion, which were not easily assimilated to nationalist

Contents

List of Illustrationsvii
Acknowledgmentsix
A Note on Translation, Transliteration, and Use of Foreign Termsxiii
Introduction1
1Forging a Language Policy27
2Puajabi Print Culture62
3A Punjabi Literary Formation91
4Place and Personhood123
5Piety and Devotion150
Conclusion183
Appendix A. Colonial-Era Hir-Ranjha Texts Consulted195
Appendix B. Punjabi Newspapers, 1880-1905203
Appendix C. Punjabi Books Published Prior to 1867206
Notes209
Bibliography245
Index271

Sample Pages

















Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to The Social Space of Language (Vernacular Culture in British Colonial... (History | Books)

The Indian Army and The Making of Punjab
by Rajit Mazumder
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Permanent Black
Item Code: NAG486
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
1857: The Role of Punjab, Haryana and Himachal Pradesh
by K. C. Yadav
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
National Book Trust, India
Item Code: NAD366
$28.00$21.00
You save: $7.00 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Through The Indian Mutiny: The Memoirs of James Fairweather 4th Punjab Native Infanty 1857-58
by William Wright
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Westland Ltd.
Item Code: NAE303
$30.00$22.50
You save: $7.50 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Making of Little Punjab in Canada: Patterns of Immigration
Item Code: IDE591
$45.00$33.75
You save: $11.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Simla The Summer Capital of British India
by Raaja Bhasin
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAF436
$30.00$22.50
You save: $7.50 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
India's Environmental History: From Ancient Times to The Colonial Period (Set of Two Volumes)
Item Code: NAF835
$70.00$52.50
You save: $17.50 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Language of Secular Islam: Urdu Nationalism and Colonial India
Item Code: NAF598
$40.00$30.00
You save: $10.00 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Recasting Women (Essays in Colonial History)
Item Code: NAF928
$35.00$26.25
You save: $8.75 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Rhetoric and Reality: Gender and the Colonial Experience in South Asia
Item Code: IDF348
$45.00$33.75
You save: $11.25 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
An Overview of Maharaja Ranjit Singh and His Times
Item Code: NAJ313
$31.50$23.62
You save: $7.88 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Since 1947 Partition Narratives Among Punjabi Migrants of Delhi
by Ravinder Kaur
PaperBack (Edition: 2007)
Oxford University Press
Item Code: IDI714
$30.00$22.50
You save: $7.50 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Penguin 1857 Reader
by Pramod K. Nayar
Paperback (Edition: 2007)
Penguin Books India Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAF247
$23.50$17.62
You save: $5.88 (25%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
The statues arrived yesterday. They are beautiful! Thank you!
Gregory Hancock Dance Theatre, Indiana
I have purchased several items from Exotic India: Bronze and wood statues, books and apparel. I have been very pleased with all the items. Their delivery is prompt, packaging very secure and the price reasonable.
Heramba, USA
Exotic India you are great! It's my third order and i'm very pleased with you. I'm intrested in Yoga,Meditation,Vedanta ,Upanishads,so,i'm naturally happy i found many rare titles in your unique garden! Thanks!!!
Fotis, Greece
I've just received the shawl and love it already!! Thank you so much,
Ina, Germany
The books arrived today and I have to congratulate you on such a WONDERFUL packing job! I have never, ever, received such beautifully and carefully packed items from India in all my years of ordering. Each and every book arrived in perfect shape--thanks to the extreme care you all took in double-boxing them and using very strong boxes. (Oh how I wished that other businesses in India would learn to do the same! You won't believe what some items have looked like when they've arrived!) Again, thank you very much. And rest assured that I will soon order more books. And I will also let everyone that I know, at every opportunity, how great your business and service has been for me. Truly very appreciated, Namaste.
B. Werts, USA
Very good service. Very speed and fine. I recommand
Laure, France
Thank you! As always, I can count on Exotic India to find treasures not found in stores in my area.
Florence, USA
Thank you very much. It was very easy ordering from the website. I hope to do future purchases from you. Thanks again.
Santiago, USA
Thank you for great service in the past. I am a returning customer and have purchased many Puranas from your firm. Please continue the great service on this order also.
Raghavan, USA
Excellent service. I feel that there is genuine concern for the welfare of customers and there orders. Many thanks
Jones, United Kingdom
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2018 © Exotic India