SculpturesLargeLarge Si...

Large Size The Kathakali Dancer

Large Size  The Kathakali Dancer
Availability: Can be backordered
Specifications:
South Indian Temple Wood Carving
Artist: R. Chellappan
2.9 ft X 2.0 ft X 1.0 ft
22.0 Kg
Item Code: EH75
Price: $1350.00
Shipping Free - 4 to 6 days
This item can be back ordered
Time required to recreate this artwork: 20 to 24 weeks
Advance to be paid now (% of product value): 20%
Balance to be paid once product is ready: 80%
The amount to be tendered as advance to back order this artwork: $270.00
Viewed 14659 times since 6th May, 2011
The wood-statue, elegantly carved and tastefully painted to reveal great ethnicity and visual effects, represents a dancer’s figure performing Kathakali, the dance of Kerala. Exotic in its visual effects Kathakali, like Bharatanatyam, Kathaka, Kuchipudi, Manipuri and Odissi, has its own distinction in the classical dances of India. Kathakali is essentially a masked dance performed in a conventionalised set of costumes, a large halo and a towering crown appended to the mask, a strange-looking half drum-like well starched rounded skirt with an equal diameter around the waist and ankles, a magnificent sash with bells-like knotted ends, beaded ornaments comprising beads of larger sizes and a Vaijayanti-like looking long garland usually made of twisted textile. Except that it is provided with peep-holes for eyes a typically designed mask with white whiskers, green face and a mark of Vaishnava ‘tilaka’ on the forehead covers the dancer’s face in entirety. As the tradition has it, the king of Kottayam one night dreamt of a man engaged in dancing wearing in typical set of costume. Taking it as a divine injunction he designed the Kathakali dancer’s costume as he had seen in his dream.

Kathakali is a combination of ‘nratya’ and ‘abhinaya’ – dance and dramatic interpretation of a theme which is usually a narration : a story; something denotative of what the term Kathakali literally means. Kathakali’s literal meaning is ‘story-play’, that is, revealing a story while performing on the stage, and performing to reveal the story while performing a dance. Initially Kathakali synthesised with the Aryan cult of dance the Dravidian worship cult of the Mother Goddess. In the course of time Kathakali began performing literary classics like the plays of Kalidasa, Bhasha and Harsha. Broadly, the stories enacted were taken from temple bards whose solo performances were known as ‘Prabandha-koothu’ – narrative tales, and their group performances, ‘Kudiyattam’. Kathakali was born of ‘Kudiyattam’. Around mid-seventeenth century, inspired by Jaideva’s Gita-Govinda there evolved ‘Krishnattam’ mandating the dancer to adorn like Krishna. By the end of the seventeenth century there spread the cult of Rama and like ‘Krishnattam’ there evolved ‘Ramattam’. Thus, ‘Kathakali’ in the process of its growth had these religious leanings, and hence a spiritual fervour as a result ‘Kathakali’s masks were cast either as Krishna or as Rama.

Thus, a blend of many forms, Kathakali is essentially a devotional dance. Here the dancer has been styled on strict Vaishnava line sharing features from Rama’s iconography. A single figure in solo dance form the sculpted dancer represents ‘Prabandha-Koothu’, Kathakali’s initial form. It does not incorporate even the mradanga-player, an almost essential accompaniment of Kathakali. Mradanga is a cylindrical long drum with narrow openings for leather-mounting associated with Kathakali since earliest times. In most dance-forms the dancer is seen translating the text recited along the dance in his ‘mudrayen’ – body-gestures. However, the Kathakali dancer does not do it. As in Krishnattam, Kathakali lets the singer deal exclusively with the text leaving the dancer free for choreographic interpretation. Kathakali is a finer expression for while most other dances have just twenty-four ‘mudrayen’, Kathakali has seven hundred. Facial expressions, mainly through the eyes trained to cast eight glances, are of cardinal significance in Kathakali.

This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr. Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of literature and is the author of numerous books on Indian art and culture. Dr. Daljeet is the curator of the Miniature Painting Gallery, National Museum, New Delhi. They have both collaborated together on a number of books.

Of Related Interest:

More Kathakali Art

The Art of Dancing

More Sculptures by the Same Artist


Delivered by to all international destinations within 3 to 5 days, fully insured.

Read more...
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to Large Size The Kathakali Dancer (Large | Sculptures)

Decorated Dancing Peacock
Dancing Goddess Saraswati
Dancing Radha Krishna (Large Size)
Dancing Goddess Saraswati with Vegetative Arched-Shaped Aureole and Ganesha Lakshmi on Base
Super Large Size Dancing Ganesha
Dancing Lord Ganesha Panel with Five Manifestations of Ganesha
Dancing Radha Krishna
Dancing Ganesha with Two Shivagan
Decorative Cupboard With Romantic Figure Paintings
The Power Of Shivatandava
Large Size Yakshi, The Celestial Dancer
The Dancer
Large Size Celestial Dancer Putting on Bells on Feet
Testimonials
I have always been delighted with your excellent service and variety of items.
James, USA
I've been happy with prior purchases from this site!
Priya, USA
Thank you. You are providing an excellent and unique service.
Thiru, UK
Thank You very much for this wonderful opportunity for helping people to acquire the spiritual treasures of Hinduism at such an affordable price.
Ramakrishna, Australia
I really LOVE you! Wonderful selections, prices and service. Thank you!
Tina, USA
This is to inform you that the shipment of my order has arrived in perfect condition. The actual shipment took only less than two weeks, which is quite good seen the circumstances. I waited with my response until now since the Buddha statue was a present that I handed over just recently. The Medicine Buddha was meant for a lady who is active in the healing business and the statue was just the right thing for her. I downloaded the respective mantras and chants so that she can work with the benefits of the spiritual meanings of the statue and the mantras. She is really delighted and immediately fell in love with the beautiful statue. I am most grateful to you for having provided this wonderful work of art. We both have a strong relationship with Buddhism and know to appreciate the valuable spiritual power of this way of thinking. So thank you very much again and I am sure that I will come back again.
Bernd, Spain
You have the best selection of Hindu religous art and books and excellent service.i AM THANKFUL FOR BOTH.
Michael, USA
I am very happy with your service, and have now added a web page recommending you for those interested in Vedic astrology books: https://www.learnastrologyfree.com/vedicbooks.htm Many blessings to you.
Hank, USA
As usual I love your merchandise!!!
Anthea, USA
You have a fine selection of books on Hindu and Buddhist philosophy.
Walter, USA