Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Paintings > South Indian > Lord Ganapati, The God of Auspiciousness
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Lord Ganapati, The God of Auspiciousness

Lord Ganapati, The God of Auspiciousness

Lord Ganapati, The God of Auspiciousness

The painting, an excellent example of Tanjore art style, represents Lord Ganesha, the god of auspiciousness, obstacle-free beginning and accomplishment of the desired. Not that human images are barred, begun as alternative to temple sculptures Tanjore paintings are by and large votive in nature, and more often bold representations of the likenesses.

Availability:
Only One in stock
Exclusive
Specifications:

Tanjore Painting on Board
Traditional Colors with 24 Karat Gold
Artist: Hemlata Kumawat

20.0 inch X 30.0 inch
Deal 25% Off
Item Code:
PT52
Frame
Price:
$1495.00
Discounted:
$1121.25   Shipping Free - 4 to 6 days
You Save:
$373.75 (25%)
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Lord Ganapati, The God of Auspiciousness
From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 16458 times since 25th Dec, 2014

Barring themes like Shiva performing Tandava, Rama’s enthronement, Krishna lifting Mount Govardhana, gods in groups, performance of worship rituals and the like apart Tanjore paintings are neither illustrative nor narrative; they are rather iconic. Unlike a miniature, a painting on a tiny piece of paper rendered in colours, the Tanjore style’s distinction, visual effect, all its resplendence or rather its divine aura is born largely of its material mediums, gold and silver foils, leaves of other metals, and precious and semi-precious stones, beads, mirrors …, that it uses in realising a theme on a piece of board. As conditions its mediums, in its representative form a Tanjore painting better reveals itself when it consists of a single image, or just a few, in bold and large sizes.

Characteristic to a Tanjore painting the artist has used Lord Ganesha’s single image large in size and bold and elaborate in details. The tiny mouse, his mount, greedily looking at ‘modakas’ offered to Lord Ganesha in large golden baskets, is the only other image, besides the Master’s, that the artist has included in the painting. Representing this image of Lord Ganesha the artist, respecting his status as the supreme divinity, as well as the norms of iconography for divine imagery, has used only golden foil symbolic of gold – the supreme of metals, besides precious stones : rubies, emeralds, sapphires, peals and diamonds. White not the colour of gods, silver foil is rarely used in divine images except sometimes for defining ritual paraphernalia, seat or architecture. Along Lakshmi Lord Ganesha is also considered as the patron of riches, hence, in the painting silver has been completely excluded and the use of gold is in abundance. 

This benign image of the elephant god, a blend of at least two of his forms, Ekadanta – single-tusked, and Vakratunda – curved trunked, enshrines a gold-panelled ‘vedika’ – sanctum, inlaid all over with precious stones – rubies, emeralds, sapphires, diamonds, pearls … He is seated against a huge bolster made of velvet and worked with gold on an elevated throne consisting of gold and velvet cushion and embellished with precious gems of various kinds. Over the side pillars the ‘vedika’ rises to mid-height and from here onwards there rises over it an arched opening of the ‘vedika’; the pattern of the arches is shallow. These arch-recesses have been adorned with frills composed of flowers and leaves. The vedika’s superstructure consists of three domes, one in the centre being flattish horizontally stretching and topped by a number of finials, and those on sides, modelled like onion-bulbs. All three domes rise over well-defined necks and are fluted. The finials over them are typically Indo-Islamic, the base being pot-like, and apex, star-like. The central dome has under it a Kirttimukha motif, the symbol of auspiciousness. The vedika’s superstructure is typically characteristic of Dravidian temple architecture.

With both of his feet turned to left the four-armed Lord Ganesha is seated in abhaya-mudra – gesture of granting freedom from fear that his mere presence ensures; hence, he carries either no weapons or a very few. Here in this manifestation he is carrying just an elephant goad. He is holding his normal right hand in ‘abhaya’, the gesture of granting freedom from fear; in the normal left he carries a ‘laddu’, and another, in his trunk, symbolic of the accomplishment of all desired and the vigour of life. In the upper left the patron of entire knowledge and giver of right wisdom Lord Ganesha carries a pen. A magnificent piece of jewellery his crown made of gold and inlaid with most precious stones is in the South Indian tradition but not as towering as a Vaishnava crown. Besides a green sash richly worked with gold stripes Lord Ganesha is wearing an ‘antariya’ – lower garment consisting of yellow silk and gold zari. He is putting on various ornaments on his neck, breast, waist, feet, forehead, shoulders, arms, hands, a ‘vaijayanti’ of fresh flowers and a ‘naga-bandha’ – yajnopavit consisting of a snake.

This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of ancient Indian literature. Dr Daljeet is the chief curator of the Visual Arts Gallery at the National Museum of India, New Delhi. They have both collaborated on numerous books on Indian art and culture.
Post a Comment
 
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait
Testimonials
I received the Nataraj sculpture today and it is beautiful! Thank you so much for packing it so carefully and shipping so quickly! 
Emiko, USA
Thank you for shipping the book. Appreciate your website and ease of use.
Sivaprasad, USA
Nice website--clear, easy to use, no glitches.
M. Brice
Thank you for providing great stuff during such a crazy time. Have a great day!
Ben
Thank you so much for creating abundance for many people in their growth and understanding of themselves and our world. Your site has offers many resources in growing and learning spiritually, physically, and also mentally. It is much needed in our world today, and I thank you.
M. Altman, USA
The book intended for my neighbour has arrived in the netherlands, very pleased to do business with India :)
Erik, Netherlands
Thank you for selling such useful items.   Much love.
Daniel, USA
I have beeen using this website for along time n i got book which I ordered n im getting fully benefited. And I recomend others to visit this wesite n do shopping thanks.
Leela, USA
IAs a serious student and teacher of Bhagavad Gītā, Upaniṣad and Jyotiṣa I have found you have some good editions of English with sanskrit texts. Having texts of high quality with both is essential.   This has been a user friendly experience
Dean, USA
Very happy with the purchase!
Amee, USA
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2020 © Exotic India