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Buddhist Books

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Showing 1 to 20 of 1248 items in a total of 63 pages
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The Iconography of Tibetan Lamaism
by Antoinette K. Gordon
Hardcover (Edition: 1998)
Munshiram Manoharlal Publication

Item Code: IAB03
Price: $55.00
A New Course in Reading Pali (Entering the Word of the Buddha)
by JAMES W. GAIR & W.S. KARUNATILLAKE
Paperback (Edition: 20014)
Motilal Banarsidass Publishers Pvt. Ltd.

Item Code: IDC255
Price: $35.00
Zen-Yoga - A Creative Psychotherapy to Self-Integration
by P.J. Saher
Hardcover (Edition: 2015)
Motilal Banarsidass Pvt. Ltd.

Item Code: IDC342
Price: $50.00
Nagarjuna’s a Drop of Nourishment for People and its commentary The Jewel Ornament
by Dr. Stanley Frye
Paperback (Edition: 2003)
Library of Tibetan Works & Archives, Dharamsala

Item Code: IDC382
Price: $12.00
Mudras in Buddhist and Hindu Practices: An Iconographic Consideration
by Fredrick W. Bunce
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
D. K. Printworld. Pvt. Ltd.

Item Code: IDE188
Price: $80.00
Chandrakirti's Seven Fold Reasonsing (Meditation on the Selfness of Persons)
by Joe Wilson
Paperback (Edition: 2006)
Library of Tibetan Works & Archives< Dharamsala

Item Code: IDK537
Price: $15.00
Beyond Eternity Through Mysticism
by Lama Thinley Dorjey Bhutin
Paperback (Edition: 2007)
Paljor Publications (P) Ltd.

Item Code: IDL140
Price: $30.00
Three Texts on Madhyamaka (gser mdog panchen shakya mchog idan 1428-1507)
by
Paperback (Edition: 2000)
Library of Tibetan works & Archives

Item Code: NAB715
Price: $22.00
A Manual of Key Buddhist Terms (Categorization of Buddhist Terminology with Commentary)
by Lotsawa Kawa Paltseg
Paperback (Edition: 20015)
Library of Tibetan Works and Archives

Item Code: NAD692
Price: $25.00
The Gospel of Buddha
by Dr. Paul Carus
Paperback (Edition: 2015)
Publications Division

Item Code: NAK181
Price: $25.00
Science of Consciousness (A Synthesis of Vedanta and Buddhism)
by V. N. Misra
Hardcover (Edition: 2014)
Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd

Item Code: NAK967
Price: $65.00
The Book of Wisdom: The Heart of Tibetan Buddhism
by Osho
Paperback (Edition: 2005)
Osho Media International

Item Code: IDH509
Price: $55.00
Nagarjuna's Verses on the Great Vehicle and the Heart of Dependent Origination
by R.C. Jamieson
Hardcover (Edition: 2001)
D. K. Printworld (P) Ltd.

Item Code: IDE581
Price: $27.50
Sarnath- Archaeology, Art and Architecture (World Heritage Series)
by B.R. Mani
Paperback (Edition: 2006)
Archaeological Survey of India

Item Code: IHG040
Price: $16.50
कालचक्रतन्त्रम् (संस्कृत मूल एवम् हिन्दी अनुवाद) - Kalachakra Tantram
by काशीनाथ न्यौपाने: (Kashinath Nyaupane)
Hardcover (Edition: 2013)
Indian mind

Item Code: HAA226
Price: $30.00
Kalacakra Tantra (Kalachakra Tantra)
by Geshe Ngawang Dhargyey, Translated by Gelong Jhampa Kelsang (Allan Wallace)
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Library of Tibetan Works & Archives

Item Code: IHE054
Price: $22.50
Tantra in Tibet – The Great Exposition of Secret Mantra-Volume I
by Tsong-ka-pa
Paperback (Edition: 1987)
Motilal Banarsidass Publishers

Item Code: NAC654
Price: $21.50
Bhagavan Buddha
by R.R. Diwakar
Paperback (Edition: 2001)
Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan

Item Code: NAC183
Price: $12.50
Bodhidharma The Greatest Zen Master (Commentaries on The Teachings of the Messenger of Zen From India to China)
by Osho
Hardcover (Edition: 2011)
Osho Media International

Item Code: NAD298
Price: $45.00
SUNYA PURUSA Bauddha Vaisnavism of Orissa
by Tandra Patnaik
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
D. K. Printworld (P) Ltd.

Item Code: IDF142
Price: $27.50
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Buddhist Text Literature: What the Buddha Said and Taught
Knowledge of the teachings of the Buddha is based on several canons of scripture, which derive from the early Sangha’s oral transmission of bodies of teachings agreed on at several councils. The Theravadin ‘Pali Canon’ is preserved in the Pali language, which is based upon a dialect close to that spoken by the Buddha. It is the most complete extant early canon, and contains some of the earliest material. Most of its teachings are in fact the common property of all Buddhist schools, being simply the teachings which the Theravadins preserved from the early common stock.

The Pali literature has been divided by one scholar into roughly three periods. The early, or classical, period begins with the Pali Canon itself and ends with the Milindha-pañha about the turn of the Christian era. After a period of being in comparative disuse or decline, Pali underwent a renaissance in the 4th or 5th century with the help of Buddhaghosa, and this period lasted until the 12th Century. The third period coincides with major political changes in Burma and lasted for some time in Sri Lanka, and much longer in Burma.

The Canon is traditionally described by the Theravada as the Word of the Buddha (Buddhavacana), though this is obviously not intended in a literal sense, since it includes teachings by disciples.

The traditional Theravādin (Mahavihārin) interpretation of the Pali Canon is given in a series of commentaries covering nearly the whole Canon, compiled by Buddhaghosa (4th–5th century CE) and later monks, mainly on the basis of earlier materials now lost. Subcommentaries have been written afterward, commenting further on the Canon and its commentaries. The traditional Theravādin interpretation is summarized in Buddhaghosa's Visuddhimagga.

The Pāli Canon falls into three general categories, called pitaka (from Pali piṭaka, meaning "basket"). Because of this, the canon is traditionally known as theTipiṭaka (Sanskrit: Tripiṭaka; "three baskets"). The three pitakas are as follows:

Vinaya Pitaka ("Discipline Basket"), dealing with rules for monks and nuns

Sutta Pitaka (Sutra/Sayings Basket), discourses, mostly ascribed to the Buddha, but some to disciples

Abhidhamma Pitaka, variously described as philosophy, psychology,metaphysics, etc.

Six complete vinayas survive:

Theravada, written in Pali.

Mula-Sarvāstivāda, written in Sanskrit, but surviving complete only in Tibetan translation.

Mahāsānghika, Sarvāstivāda, Mahīshāsika, and Dharmagupta, originally in Indian languages, but only surviving in Chinese translation.

The Suttas contain the main teachings of Buddhism. Which in the Pali Canon are divided into five Nikaya’s or ‘Collections’, the first four (sixteen volumes) generally being the older. The Pali Canon was one of the earliest to be written down, this being in Sri Lanka in around 80 BC, after which little, if any, new material was added to it. There are also sections of six non-Theravadin early canons preserved in Chinese and Tibetan translations, fragments of a Sanskrit Canon still existing in Nepal, and odd texts in various languages of India and Central Asia found in Tibet, Central Asia, and Japan.

Abhidharma (in Pali, Abhidhamma) means 'further Dharma' and is concerned with the analysis of phenomena. It grew initially out of various lists of teachings such as the 37 Bodhipaksika-dharmas or the 37 Factors leading to Awakening. The Abhidharma literature is chiefly concerned with the analysis of phenomena and the relationships between them. The Theravāda Abhidhamma survives in the Pali Canon. Outside of the Theravada monasteries the Pali Abhidharma texts are not well-known.

The extensive non-canonical Pali literature includes additional Abhidhamma works, historical chronicles, and many volumes of commentaries. An extremely clear introduction to many points of Buddhist doctrine is the Milindapanha, which purports to record conversations between a Buddhist monk and Milinda (Menander; c.155-130 BC), a king of Greek ancestry. Another is the Visuddhimagga, a very influential Theravada compendium of meditation practices and doctrine, written by Buddhaghosa (fifth century AD).

Mahayana texts were composed from around the first century BC, originating as written, not oral, works. In time, they were recorded in a form of the Indian prestigious language, Sanskrit. Mahayana sutras are traditionally considered by Mahayanists to be the word of the Buddha, but transmitted either in secret, via lineages of supernatural beings (such as the nagas), or revealed directly from other Buddhas or bodhisattvas. Some 600 Mahayana Sutras have survived in Sanskrit, or in Chinese and/or Tibetan translation.While many are attributed to the Buddha, their form and content clearly show that they were later re-statements and extensions of the Buddha’s message. The main sources for our understanding of Mahayana teachings are the very extensive Chinese and Tibetan Buddhist Canons. While most of the Pali Canon has been translated into English, only selected texts from these have been translated into Western languages, though much progress is being made.

Here is a wide range of Buddhist books, covering the primary literature of Buddhism, including the complete Pali canon, as also secondary and modern studies on the texts believed to reflect the Buddha's teachings directly.

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