Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Buddhist > An Analytical Study of the Four Nikayas (An Old and Rare Book)
Displaying 89 of 1623         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
An Analytical Study of the Four Nikayas (An Old and Rare Book)
Pages from the book
An Analytical Study of the Four Nikayas (An Old and Rare Book)
Look Inside the Book
Description
About the Author

The importance of the Nikayas can neither be gainsaid nor exaggerated. They are of inestimable value representing a vivid picture of the different aspects of life and thought of the age providing important materials for studies in the religio-cultural history of contemporary India. Form the point of view of sociology they are of utmost significance, because they often introduce us the midst of the daily life of ancient Indians, of the artisans, agriculturists and merchants, of whom Brahmanical literature, of whom Brahmanical literature which moves almost entirely in the circles of priests and warriors, has so little to say. The present publication contains an outline study of the first four Nikayas-Digha, Majjhima, Samyutta and Anguttara-which belong to the Sutta Pitaka of the Pali Canon of the Theravada School of Buddhism in some important aspects. It is divided into five main chapters and three appendices dealing with the time of compilation of the Nikayas, comparison between the Agamas and the Nikayas, their language, discourses of Lord Buddha to the laymen and laywomen, tenets of early Buddhism under three divisions into Sila, Samadhi and Panna, discussions on administrative, social and economic conditions conditions of ancient India, historical and geographical materials found in the Nikayas, the mutual relations of the four Nikayas, similes utilised in these texts and brief contents of the suttas collected in the Nikayas. Thus in this dissertation efforts have been made to introduce the first four Nikayas in their entirety.

About the Author

Dipak Kumar Barua is a young scholar with a brilliant academic record. He secured the topmost position in the first class both in the B.A. (Hons.) and M.A. (with specialisation in Epigraphy, Iconography, Art and Archaeology) in Pali and obtained the D.Phil. (Arts) Degree of the University of Calcutta in 1966. His dissertation on the “Viharas in Ancient India: a survey of Buddhist monasteries” had earned for him the Premchand Roychand Studentship of the University of Calcutta. Dr. Barua also possesses a first class postgraduate diploma in Library Science of the same University. He began his carrier as the Officer-in-charge of the University Library and UNESCO Information Centre, Rabindra Bharati University, where he also served as a lecturer in the Departments of Philosophy and Sanskrit. At present he is a lecturer in the Department of Pali of the University of Calcutta. His study on “Ancient Indian Libraries” had been highly acclaimed by scholars. He had written also “Anagerika Dharmapala: A study” and edited the “Jagajjyoti: a Buddha Jayanti Annual” for the years 1970 and 1971. Dr. Burua is now engaged in research work on the “Buddhist teachers of ancient viharas of India” and on the “History of Buddhihst literature in Pali, Pure as well as Buddhist Sanskrit” He is a regular contributor to numerous learned journals and is a member of the Bengal Buddhist Association. Indian Library Association, Bengal Library Association, Indian Association for Special Libraries and Information Centres, Editorial Boards of the “Folklore” and “Nalanda”.

 

Foreword

The huge mass of the canonical literature of the Buddhists consists of collections of speeches or conversations, of sayings, songs, narratives and rules of the Sangha (Order). This is technically called the Tipitaka in the Buddhist literature and consists of the three Pitakas viz., Vinayapitaka, Suttapitaka and Abhidhammapitaka The Vinayapitaka deals with the rules and regulations for the guidance of the Buddhist Sangha (Order) and precepts for the daily life of the bhikkus (monks) and bhikkhunis (nuns). It is thus an account of the Buddhist Sangha. The Suttapitaka is a collection of the doctrinal expositions, large and small. The suttas are usually in prose, occasionally interspersed with verses. They are the most important literary products of the Buddhist literature. The Suttapitaka is thus the most, reliable source for the Dhamma, i.e., the religion of Buddha and his earliest and his earliest disciples. The Abhidhammapitaka deals with the same Dhamma as taught in the Suttapitaka and differs from the latter in its arrangement and treatment. The difference between them ‘is one not of subject-matter, but of treatment’.

The Suttapitaka consists of the following parts, viz,. The Dighanikaya, the Majjhimanikaya, the Samyuttanikaya, the Anguttaranikaya and the Khuddakanikaya which covers fifteen texts. Poinions differ as to the Khuddakanikaya belonging to the canonocal collection. The Buddhists of Burma include in the Khuddakanikaya four treaties which are not recognised as canonical in Ceylon-the Milindapanha, the Suttasangaho (an anthology from the Suttapitaka), the Petakopadesa and the Nettipakarana. The Vimanavatthu, Petavatthu, Theragatha, Thergatha, Jataka, Apadana, Buddhavamsa and Cariyapitaka,are wanting in the Khuddakanikaya in the Siamese edition of the Pali Canon. The Patisambhidamagga, the Niddesa and a part of the Jataka are not, recognised by the Mahasangitikas In the Chinese Agamas the Khuddakanikaya as a whole is also not found, but many of them are, however, found in other collections. It further ‘combines books of very different periods, and most probably of different schools also’. Thus the unsteable character of the Ghuddakanikaya in evident.

Apart from the Pali Tipitaka, we have also the Tripitaka preserved in Buddhist literature. It also consists of Agama (corresponding to the Nikaya in Pali), Vinaya and Abhidhamma. Like the Nikaya, the Sanskrit Agama is also divided into four books: Dirghagama, Madhyamagama, Samyuktagama and Ekottaragama corresponding to the four Pali Nikayas, viz., Dighanikaya, Majjhimanikaya, Samyuttanikaya, and Anguttaranikaya. Rahula Sankrityayana in his introduction to the Abhidharmakosa mentions that the Ksudrakanikaya is also counted as a separate Nikaya in the Sarvastivada Canon, although the four Agamas are very often mentioned. This Ksudrakagama corresponds to the Pali Kuddakanikaya. We are yet in the dark whether all the texts belonging to the Khuddakanikaya, the fifth Nikaya of the Pali Canon, are included in this Agama, but we know that in the Sanskrit Canon there are texts like the Udana, Dharmapada, Stharaviragatha, Vimanavastu and Buddhavamsa, corresponding to the Oali Udana, Dhammapada, Theragatha, Vimanavatthu and Buddhavamsa. The Divyavadana frequently mentions the four Agamas and the Mahavyutpatti while mentioning the manes of the religious texts refers to the four Agamas only. The Nagarjunikonda Inscription also record four Agamas and not five. The Sumangalavilasini. A commentary on the Dighanikaya, while giving an account of the First Buddhist Council records that different persons were entrusted with the Preservation of different Nikayas, or Agamas, namely, Ananda with Dighanikaya, Sariputta’s disciples with Majjhimanikaya, Mahakassapa with the Samyuttanikaya and Anuruddha with the Anguttaranikaya. But the name of the monk to whom the Khuddakanikaya was entrusted is wanting Further, the account of the First Council, given by Yuan Chwang omits to mention the Khuddakanikaya as the fifth Nikaya and speaks of the four Nikayas only. Nanjio’s Catalogue records four Agamas, viz., Dirghagama, Madhyamagama, Samyuktagama and Ekottaragama-the Ksudrakagama as the fifth Agama is also wanting there. Thus it appears that the Sutrapitaka was divided into four and not five Agamas.

The present work is an analytical study of the four Nikayas-Digha, Majjhima, Samyutta and Anguttara. The Khuddakanikaya has not been dealt with herein because of the polemic pertaining to it. The four Nikayas are indeed the greatest literary works of Buddhism, the khuddakanikaya, the fifth one being the collections elements. Dr. Dipak Kumar Barua in this work has dealt with the basic and homogeneous texts only and has thus omitted Khuddakanikaya from the scope of his study.

 

Preface

In the following pages is presented an analytical study of the first four Nikayas-Digha, Majjhima, Samyutta, and Ariguttara-which belong to the Suttapitaka of the Pali Canon of the Theravada School of Buddhism in some important aspects. The Nikayas are the collections of Suttas or Discourses of Buddha, or occasionally of his first disciples with their followers in prose sprinkled with verses. The Suttas are preceded by only a short introduction stating the place and occasion of the speeches delivered. They, apart from their religious importance, are of the utmost significance “from the point of view of social history, for they often introduce us into the minds of the daily life of the encient Indians of the artisans, agriculturists and merchants, of whom Brahmanical literature, which moves almost entirely in the circles of priests and warriors, has so little to say.” Besides, the “Nikayas appear to reflect the first and the earliest period of the history of Buddhist thought when the Sangha was in appearance at least, doctrinally one.” Thus the importance of the Nikayas can neither be gainsaid nor exaggerated. They are of inestimable value representing a vivid picture of the different aspects of life and thought of the age providing important materials for studies in the religio-cultural history of that time. While undertaking this analytical study of the first four Nikayas, I cannot resist having the impression of treading an almost virgin soil, as very few systematic attempts have been made so far in this field of Pali canonical literature. Many erudite scholars have, of course, utilised the materials contained in the Nikayas in their fields of study Thus “Four Buddhist Agamas in Chinese” (1908) of M. Anesaki deals obviously with only the Chinese Agamas. Hence it is partially helpful to me. On the other hand, A. F. Rudolf Hoernle in his “Manuscripts Remains of Buddhist Literature found in Eastern Turkestan” (1916) has endeavoured to make a systematic comparative study of the Sanskrit fragments found in Central Asia with their Pali corresponding suttas; but as far as the Madhyama Agama is concerned, only fragments of two sutras, the Upali Sutra and the suka sutra are found and they are too fragmentary and too scanty to allow a comparative evaluation. Chizen Akanuma in his “The Comparative Catalogue of the Chinese Agamas and the Pali Nikayas” (1929) ventures to compare Chinese Agamas with the Pali Nikayas; but his study although is much interesting and informative, is confined only to cataloguing the titles of corresponding sutras, and does not go into the details of the work itself. Dr. B.C. Law’s as described in early texts of Buddhism and Jainism”(1941) cannot be exhaustive as it deals with a huge volume of sacred texts of two great religious systems. Dr. G.C. Pande’s book entitled “Studies in the origins of Buddhism” (1957) although obviously voluminous does not contain a systematic study of the four Nikayas as such. Dr. Thich Mint Chau’s “The Chinese Madhyama Agama and the Pali Majjhima Nikaya: a comparative study” (1964) is indeed a meritorious and laborious work, but is concerned with a comparative trearment of only the Pali Majjhima Nikaya with the Madhyama Agama, the Canon of the Sarvastivadins, now preserved in the Chinese translation. Dr. Egaku Mayeda in his “A History of the formation of original Buddhist texts” (1964) does not make any elaborate discussion on the four Nikayas. Thus a work which deals with a systematic analytical study of the first four Nikayas as a whole has remained yet desideratum My present work is an attempt to fill this lacuna. I have made use of, as far as possible, the results of the researches made in this respect by previous scholars as also have supplemented them by a study of Buddhaghosa’s commentaries His Visuddhimagga and Upatissa’s Vimuttimagga have taken into account. The Chinese version of the Agamas as well as the epigraphic records have also been consulted. In short, in preparing the present work I have made use of, as far practicable, the sources available so far in this regard. In the presentation of the data, I have employed an analytical technique. I have made no primary statements which are not supported by internal evidence and the secondary statements are made on the basis of two or more primary statements and I have consulted directly the sources for my analysis.

As for the Pali texts I have consulted the Nikayas published by the Pali Text Society, London, although occasional references may also be found from those published by the Pali Publication Board, Nalanda. My present work is divided into five main chapters and three appendices which deals with the time of compilation of the Nikayas, comparison between the Agamas and the Nikayas, their Language, discourses of Lord Buddha to the laymen and laywomen, tenets of early Buddhism under their divisions into Sila, Samadhi and Panna, discussions on administrative, social and economic conditions of contemporary India, historical and geographical materials found in the Nikayas, mutual relations of the four Nikayas, similes utilised in these texts and brief contents of the suttas collected in the Nikayas. Thus in the dissertation efforts have been made to introduce the Digha, Majjhima, Samyutta and Anguttara Nikayas almost in their entirety.

 

Contents

 

td>td>

  Foreword  
  Preface  
  Acknowledgements  
Chapter One The Four Nikayas 1-63
  Probable time of compilation of the 1-8
  Nikays and Agamas compared 8-30
  Language of the Nikayas 30-63
Chapter Two Diacourses to the Laity 64-120
  Introductory discussion 64-68
  Definitions of Gahapati and Upasaka 68-75
  Ethical 75-88
  Religious 88-107
  Secular Discourses 107-117
  Jaina Discourses compared 117-120
Chapter Three Discourses on Sila Samadhi and Panna 121-174
  Introductory discussion 121-125
  Sila 125-142
  Samadhi 142-159
  Panna 159-174
Chapter Four Discussions on Secular Matters-Administrative, Social and Economic 175-271
  Origin of State Kingship 175-194
  Kingship 194-201
  Republican form of government 201-214
  Military Administration 214-220
  Rural Administration 220-223
  Caste 223-235
  Classes of People 235-236
  Slavery 236-238
  Marriage and Position of Women 238-240
  Offences and Punishments 240-241
  General life 241-252
  Agriculture 252-265
  Industry 260-265
  Seaproducts 265
  Trade and Commerce 265-269
  Famine 269-271
Chapter Five Historical and geographical Materials in the Nikayas 272-366
  Anga 272-279
Magadha 279-288
  Kasi 289-290
  Kosala 290-294
  Vajji 294-299
  Malla 299-302
  Cedi 302-303
  Vamsa 303-305
  Kuru 305-306
  Pancala 306-307
  Maccha 307
  Surasena 307-308
  Assaka 308-309
  Avanti 309-310
  Gandhara 310
Kamboja 310-313
  Clans and Peoples 314-322
  Conception of Jambudipa 323-325
  Physiography 325-327
  Divisions of India 327-336
  Physical features 336-348
  Places mentioned 348-366
  Appendix One  
  Mutual Relations of the Four Nikayas 367-375
  Appendix Two  
  Treatment of Similes in the Four Nikayas 376-402
  Appendix Three  
  Brief Contents of the Suttas in the Four Nikayas 403-596
  Select Bibliography 597-607
  Index to Names 609-617
  Index to Sublects 618-626
     

 

Sample Pages




















An Analytical Study of the Four Nikayas (An Old and Rare Book)

Item Code:
NAL597
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
1971
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch x 5.5 inch
Pages:
892
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 730 gms
Price:
$40.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
An Analytical Study of the Four Nikayas (An Old and Rare Book)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 1014 times since 6th Dec, 2016
About the Author

The importance of the Nikayas can neither be gainsaid nor exaggerated. They are of inestimable value representing a vivid picture of the different aspects of life and thought of the age providing important materials for studies in the religio-cultural history of contemporary India. Form the point of view of sociology they are of utmost significance, because they often introduce us the midst of the daily life of ancient Indians, of the artisans, agriculturists and merchants, of whom Brahmanical literature, of whom Brahmanical literature which moves almost entirely in the circles of priests and warriors, has so little to say. The present publication contains an outline study of the first four Nikayas-Digha, Majjhima, Samyutta and Anguttara-which belong to the Sutta Pitaka of the Pali Canon of the Theravada School of Buddhism in some important aspects. It is divided into five main chapters and three appendices dealing with the time of compilation of the Nikayas, comparison between the Agamas and the Nikayas, their language, discourses of Lord Buddha to the laymen and laywomen, tenets of early Buddhism under three divisions into Sila, Samadhi and Panna, discussions on administrative, social and economic conditions conditions of ancient India, historical and geographical materials found in the Nikayas, the mutual relations of the four Nikayas, similes utilised in these texts and brief contents of the suttas collected in the Nikayas. Thus in this dissertation efforts have been made to introduce the first four Nikayas in their entirety.

About the Author

Dipak Kumar Barua is a young scholar with a brilliant academic record. He secured the topmost position in the first class both in the B.A. (Hons.) and M.A. (with specialisation in Epigraphy, Iconography, Art and Archaeology) in Pali and obtained the D.Phil. (Arts) Degree of the University of Calcutta in 1966. His dissertation on the “Viharas in Ancient India: a survey of Buddhist monasteries” had earned for him the Premchand Roychand Studentship of the University of Calcutta. Dr. Barua also possesses a first class postgraduate diploma in Library Science of the same University. He began his carrier as the Officer-in-charge of the University Library and UNESCO Information Centre, Rabindra Bharati University, where he also served as a lecturer in the Departments of Philosophy and Sanskrit. At present he is a lecturer in the Department of Pali of the University of Calcutta. His study on “Ancient Indian Libraries” had been highly acclaimed by scholars. He had written also “Anagerika Dharmapala: A study” and edited the “Jagajjyoti: a Buddha Jayanti Annual” for the years 1970 and 1971. Dr. Burua is now engaged in research work on the “Buddhist teachers of ancient viharas of India” and on the “History of Buddhihst literature in Pali, Pure as well as Buddhist Sanskrit” He is a regular contributor to numerous learned journals and is a member of the Bengal Buddhist Association. Indian Library Association, Bengal Library Association, Indian Association for Special Libraries and Information Centres, Editorial Boards of the “Folklore” and “Nalanda”.

 

Foreword

The huge mass of the canonical literature of the Buddhists consists of collections of speeches or conversations, of sayings, songs, narratives and rules of the Sangha (Order). This is technically called the Tipitaka in the Buddhist literature and consists of the three Pitakas viz., Vinayapitaka, Suttapitaka and Abhidhammapitaka The Vinayapitaka deals with the rules and regulations for the guidance of the Buddhist Sangha (Order) and precepts for the daily life of the bhikkus (monks) and bhikkhunis (nuns). It is thus an account of the Buddhist Sangha. The Suttapitaka is a collection of the doctrinal expositions, large and small. The suttas are usually in prose, occasionally interspersed with verses. They are the most important literary products of the Buddhist literature. The Suttapitaka is thus the most, reliable source for the Dhamma, i.e., the religion of Buddha and his earliest and his earliest disciples. The Abhidhammapitaka deals with the same Dhamma as taught in the Suttapitaka and differs from the latter in its arrangement and treatment. The difference between them ‘is one not of subject-matter, but of treatment’.

The Suttapitaka consists of the following parts, viz,. The Dighanikaya, the Majjhimanikaya, the Samyuttanikaya, the Anguttaranikaya and the Khuddakanikaya which covers fifteen texts. Poinions differ as to the Khuddakanikaya belonging to the canonocal collection. The Buddhists of Burma include in the Khuddakanikaya four treaties which are not recognised as canonical in Ceylon-the Milindapanha, the Suttasangaho (an anthology from the Suttapitaka), the Petakopadesa and the Nettipakarana. The Vimanavatthu, Petavatthu, Theragatha, Thergatha, Jataka, Apadana, Buddhavamsa and Cariyapitaka,are wanting in the Khuddakanikaya in the Siamese edition of the Pali Canon. The Patisambhidamagga, the Niddesa and a part of the Jataka are not, recognised by the Mahasangitikas In the Chinese Agamas the Khuddakanikaya as a whole is also not found, but many of them are, however, found in other collections. It further ‘combines books of very different periods, and most probably of different schools also’. Thus the unsteable character of the Ghuddakanikaya in evident.

Apart from the Pali Tipitaka, we have also the Tripitaka preserved in Buddhist literature. It also consists of Agama (corresponding to the Nikaya in Pali), Vinaya and Abhidhamma. Like the Nikaya, the Sanskrit Agama is also divided into four books: Dirghagama, Madhyamagama, Samyuktagama and Ekottaragama corresponding to the four Pali Nikayas, viz., Dighanikaya, Majjhimanikaya, Samyuttanikaya, and Anguttaranikaya. Rahula Sankrityayana in his introduction to the Abhidharmakosa mentions that the Ksudrakanikaya is also counted as a separate Nikaya in the Sarvastivada Canon, although the four Agamas are very often mentioned. This Ksudrakagama corresponds to the Pali Kuddakanikaya. We are yet in the dark whether all the texts belonging to the Khuddakanikaya, the fifth Nikaya of the Pali Canon, are included in this Agama, but we know that in the Sanskrit Canon there are texts like the Udana, Dharmapada, Stharaviragatha, Vimanavastu and Buddhavamsa, corresponding to the Oali Udana, Dhammapada, Theragatha, Vimanavatthu and Buddhavamsa. The Divyavadana frequently mentions the four Agamas and the Mahavyutpatti while mentioning the manes of the religious texts refers to the four Agamas only. The Nagarjunikonda Inscription also record four Agamas and not five. The Sumangalavilasini. A commentary on the Dighanikaya, while giving an account of the First Buddhist Council records that different persons were entrusted with the Preservation of different Nikayas, or Agamas, namely, Ananda with Dighanikaya, Sariputta’s disciples with Majjhimanikaya, Mahakassapa with the Samyuttanikaya and Anuruddha with the Anguttaranikaya. But the name of the monk to whom the Khuddakanikaya was entrusted is wanting Further, the account of the First Council, given by Yuan Chwang omits to mention the Khuddakanikaya as the fifth Nikaya and speaks of the four Nikayas only. Nanjio’s Catalogue records four Agamas, viz., Dirghagama, Madhyamagama, Samyuktagama and Ekottaragama-the Ksudrakagama as the fifth Agama is also wanting there. Thus it appears that the Sutrapitaka was divided into four and not five Agamas.

The present work is an analytical study of the four Nikayas-Digha, Majjhima, Samyutta and Anguttara. The Khuddakanikaya has not been dealt with herein because of the polemic pertaining to it. The four Nikayas are indeed the greatest literary works of Buddhism, the khuddakanikaya, the fifth one being the collections elements. Dr. Dipak Kumar Barua in this work has dealt with the basic and homogeneous texts only and has thus omitted Khuddakanikaya from the scope of his study.

 

Preface

In the following pages is presented an analytical study of the first four Nikayas-Digha, Majjhima, Samyutta, and Ariguttara-which belong to the Suttapitaka of the Pali Canon of the Theravada School of Buddhism in some important aspects. The Nikayas are the collections of Suttas or Discourses of Buddha, or occasionally of his first disciples with their followers in prose sprinkled with verses. The Suttas are preceded by only a short introduction stating the place and occasion of the speeches delivered. They, apart from their religious importance, are of the utmost significance “from the point of view of social history, for they often introduce us into the minds of the daily life of the encient Indians of the artisans, agriculturists and merchants, of whom Brahmanical literature, which moves almost entirely in the circles of priests and warriors, has so little to say.” Besides, the “Nikayas appear to reflect the first and the earliest period of the history of Buddhist thought when the Sangha was in appearance at least, doctrinally one.” Thus the importance of the Nikayas can neither be gainsaid nor exaggerated. They are of inestimable value representing a vivid picture of the different aspects of life and thought of the age providing important materials for studies in the religio-cultural history of that time. While undertaking this analytical study of the first four Nikayas, I cannot resist having the impression of treading an almost virgin soil, as very few systematic attempts have been made so far in this field of Pali canonical literature. Many erudite scholars have, of course, utilised the materials contained in the Nikayas in their fields of study Thus “Four Buddhist Agamas in Chinese” (1908) of M. Anesaki deals obviously with only the Chinese Agamas. Hence it is partially helpful to me. On the other hand, A. F. Rudolf Hoernle in his “Manuscripts Remains of Buddhist Literature found in Eastern Turkestan” (1916) has endeavoured to make a systematic comparative study of the Sanskrit fragments found in Central Asia with their Pali corresponding suttas; but as far as the Madhyama Agama is concerned, only fragments of two sutras, the Upali Sutra and the suka sutra are found and they are too fragmentary and too scanty to allow a comparative evaluation. Chizen Akanuma in his “The Comparative Catalogue of the Chinese Agamas and the Pali Nikayas” (1929) ventures to compare Chinese Agamas with the Pali Nikayas; but his study although is much interesting and informative, is confined only to cataloguing the titles of corresponding sutras, and does not go into the details of the work itself. Dr. B.C. Law’s as described in early texts of Buddhism and Jainism”(1941) cannot be exhaustive as it deals with a huge volume of sacred texts of two great religious systems. Dr. G.C. Pande’s book entitled “Studies in the origins of Buddhism” (1957) although obviously voluminous does not contain a systematic study of the four Nikayas as such. Dr. Thich Mint Chau’s “The Chinese Madhyama Agama and the Pali Majjhima Nikaya: a comparative study” (1964) is indeed a meritorious and laborious work, but is concerned with a comparative trearment of only the Pali Majjhima Nikaya with the Madhyama Agama, the Canon of the Sarvastivadins, now preserved in the Chinese translation. Dr. Egaku Mayeda in his “A History of the formation of original Buddhist texts” (1964) does not make any elaborate discussion on the four Nikayas. Thus a work which deals with a systematic analytical study of the first four Nikayas as a whole has remained yet desideratum My present work is an attempt to fill this lacuna. I have made use of, as far as possible, the results of the researches made in this respect by previous scholars as also have supplemented them by a study of Buddhaghosa’s commentaries His Visuddhimagga and Upatissa’s Vimuttimagga have taken into account. The Chinese version of the Agamas as well as the epigraphic records have also been consulted. In short, in preparing the present work I have made use of, as far practicable, the sources available so far in this regard. In the presentation of the data, I have employed an analytical technique. I have made no primary statements which are not supported by internal evidence and the secondary statements are made on the basis of two or more primary statements and I have consulted directly the sources for my analysis.

As for the Pali texts I have consulted the Nikayas published by the Pali Text Society, London, although occasional references may also be found from those published by the Pali Publication Board, Nalanda. My present work is divided into five main chapters and three appendices which deals with the time of compilation of the Nikayas, comparison between the Agamas and the Nikayas, their Language, discourses of Lord Buddha to the laymen and laywomen, tenets of early Buddhism under their divisions into Sila, Samadhi and Panna, discussions on administrative, social and economic conditions of contemporary India, historical and geographical materials found in the Nikayas, mutual relations of the four Nikayas, similes utilised in these texts and brief contents of the suttas collected in the Nikayas. Thus in the dissertation efforts have been made to introduce the Digha, Majjhima, Samyutta and Anguttara Nikayas almost in their entirety.

 

Contents

 

td>td>

  Foreword  
  Preface  
  Acknowledgements  
Chapter One The Four Nikayas 1-63
  Probable time of compilation of the 1-8
  Nikays and Agamas compared 8-30
  Language of the Nikayas 30-63
Chapter Two Diacourses to the Laity 64-120
  Introductory discussion 64-68
  Definitions of Gahapati and Upasaka 68-75
  Ethical 75-88
  Religious 88-107
  Secular Discourses 107-117
  Jaina Discourses compared 117-120
Chapter Three Discourses on Sila Samadhi and Panna 121-174
  Introductory discussion 121-125
  Sila 125-142
  Samadhi 142-159
  Panna 159-174
Chapter Four Discussions on Secular Matters-Administrative, Social and Economic 175-271
  Origin of State Kingship 175-194
  Kingship 194-201
  Republican form of government 201-214
  Military Administration 214-220
  Rural Administration 220-223
  Caste 223-235
  Classes of People 235-236
  Slavery 236-238
  Marriage and Position of Women 238-240
  Offences and Punishments 240-241
  General life 241-252
  Agriculture 252-265
  Industry 260-265
  Seaproducts 265
  Trade and Commerce 265-269
  Famine 269-271
Chapter Five Historical and geographical Materials in the Nikayas 272-366
  Anga 272-279
Magadha 279-288
  Kasi 289-290
  Kosala 290-294
  Vajji 294-299
  Malla 299-302
  Cedi 302-303
  Vamsa 303-305
  Kuru 305-306
  Pancala 306-307
  Maccha 307
  Surasena 307-308
  Assaka 308-309
  Avanti 309-310
  Gandhara 310
Kamboja 310-313
  Clans and Peoples 314-322
  Conception of Jambudipa 323-325
  Physiography 325-327
  Divisions of India 327-336
  Physical features 336-348
  Places mentioned 348-366
  Appendix One  
  Mutual Relations of the Four Nikayas 367-375
  Appendix Two  
  Treatment of Similes in the Four Nikayas 376-402
  Appendix Three  
  Brief Contents of the Suttas in the Four Nikayas 403-596
  Select Bibliography 597-607
  Index to Names 609-617
  Index to Sublects 618-626
     

 

Sample Pages




















Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Life in Ancient India (As Depicted in The Digha-Nikaya): An Old Book
by Dr. Chittaranjan Patra
Hardcover (Edition: 1996)
Punthi Pustak
Item Code: NAJ357
$27.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Chinese Madhyama Agama and the Pali Majjhima Nikaya
Deal 10% Off
Item Code: IDC159
$35.00$31.50
You save: $3.50 (10%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
An Analytical Study Of Four Nikayas
Item Code: IDD903
$45.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Ten Suttas From Digha Nikaya (Long Discourses of the Buddha)
Hardcover (Edition: 1999)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: NAE175
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Twenty-Five Suttas From Majjhimapannasa (A Rare Book)
Hardcover (Edition: 1991)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: NAH298
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
STUDIES IN THE ORIGINS OF BUDDHISM
Item Code: IDC304
$55.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Dhammapada: A Collection of Verses
Item Code: NAC394
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

The Lakshmi statue arrived today and it is beautiful. Thank you so much for all of your help. I am thrilled and she is an amazing statue for my living room.
Susanna, West Hollywood, CA.
I received my ordered items in good condition. I appreciate your excellent service that includes a very good collection of items and prompt delivery service arrangements upon receiving the order.
Ram, USA
Adishankaracharya arrived safely in Munich. You all did a great job. The packaging was extraordinary well done. Thanks to all of you. I´m very happy...
Hermann, Germany
We had placed the order on your site and we received it today. We had tried a lot for finding that book but we couldn't. Thanks for the book.This was what we wanted.
Harkaran
I received my items in good condition. Packing was excellent. I appreciate your excellent service that includes a very good array of items you offer, various good shipping options, and prompt response upon receiving the order.
Ram
I received the necklace today. It is absolutely beautiful -so amazing. And the beautiful box it came in. Thank you so much for this amazing art. Very best regards.
Clare, Ireland
I received a dupatta with a Warli print. It is so beautiful! Great price.
Marie, USA
I just got the package delivered. The books look in good condition from outside. Thanks again. It is always a pleasure doing business with you.
Shambhu, Brooklyn
I wanted to let you know that the books arrived yesterday in excellent condition. Many, many thanks for the very rapid response. My husband had purchased many years ago a Kâshî Sanskrit Series edition of Nâgesha’s work that lacked the second volume. Delighted to have found the entire work — and in the original edition.
Cheryl, Portland.
I received a sterling silver cuff and ring. Both are more beautiful than I imagined. They came in a beautiful box; I will treasure them. The items here are made by artists.. and the shipping was faster than I expected.
Marie, USA
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India