Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Ayurveda > History Of Chemistry In Ancient And Medieval India: Incorporating the History of Hindu Chemistry
Displaying 564 of 1564         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
History Of Chemistry In Ancient And Medieval India: Incorporating the   History of Hindu Chemistry
Pages from the book
History Of Chemistry In Ancient And Medieval India: Incorporating the History of Hindu Chemistry
Look Inside the Book
Description

Foreword

As the History of Hindu Chemistry by the late Acharya Prafulla Chandra Ray, the Founder-President of the Indian Chemical Society, went out of print some two decades ago, and the necessity for its republication was being felt by all students of the history of science, the Council of the Society at one of its meetings in 1948 decided to publish a revised edition of the book. It was further resolved that the new publication should incorporate all additional important materials that had since been brought to light, and that its name should consequently be changed to "History of Chemistry in Ancient and Medieval India". A publication board comprising a few distinguished Fellows of the Society with Prof. Priyadaranjan Ray as the Editor, was constituted for the purpose, and Prof. Ray was entrusted with the task of preparing the manuscript.

As the resources of the Society were too limited to meet the cost of the publication, an appeal for financial assistance to the scheme was issued. In response to this the Society received a sum of Rs, 18,153/- as donations from various organisations. The fund has recently been augmented by a grant of Rs. 5,000/- from the Government of India.

The Society takes this opportunity of recording its grateful appreciation of the generous help received.

It was originally announced that the book would be placed before the public by the end of 1953 or in the early part of 1954, but owing to certain unforeseen circumstances over which the Society had no control, the publication has been considerably delayed. For this, the Society owes an apology to all its Donors, Fellows and Subscribers. The Society also regrets that, due to some difficulties connected with the press, some printing errors have crept into the text.

It is indeed a matter of great misfortune for the Society that one of the members of the publication board, Dr. S. S. Bhatnagar, did not live to see the publication of the book.

In spite of all its imperfections, it is hoped that the present volume will be found as useful as its original edition, the “History of Hindu Chemistry”. The Society has placed itself under a deep debt of gratitude to Prof. Priyadarnjan Ray for his painstaking and devoted work in connection with the revision and editing of this great book by the late Acharya.

Preface

History does not, as generally represented, consist merely in the shifting of geographical boundaries of countries and dominions, in the changes of their names, in the military exploits of royalties and nations, or even in the undulations and migrations of greater and lesser waves of populations. These are but the casual and external changes, and may be viewed upon as the symptoms of the great mental vicissitudes of the human race. In the opinion of many eminent thinkers, individual fortunes or individual events, by themselves, are not of real importance in history, though they may be highly sensational or of great political and economic significance for the time being and occupy the headlines of newspapers. History, from a philosophical point of view, represents, in fact, a long range process involving very long durations and very large numbers. Individual persons or events are important in history to the extent they serve as symptoms of this long range process and as means to the realization of this process. For, individuals have their rise and decay, while 'history is a continuous process and knows no end. The real history of mankind is, therefore, constituted by the thoughts of the past; the leading conceptions of all remarkable forms of civilization; the achievements of genius, of virtue and of high faith. In short, it is the record of the past experience of humanity and of the evolution of the human mind with its ideas and sentiments, its truths and toils, its virtues and guilt. The scientific and cultural achievements of mankind, representing the progress of civilization, therefore, supply the materials for real history. In fact, history becomes utterly incomplete, if it fails to narrate the progress and development of science which has led to the modern civilization with its remarkable achievements. If there be any unfailing criterion for the growth of civilization or the evolution of human mind, it lies in the progressive unification of the world to which science has undeniably made, the greatest contribution, inspite of the two frightful international conflicts on a global scale and a more intensive preparation for the third, aided by catastrophic atomic weapons derived from the pursuit of science itself. History of science, therefore, constitutes an integral part of the history of human civilization or of the true human annals of the earth; and as knowledge and wisdom grow only on the accumulated experiences of the past, it forms an essential element in the study of science itself.

But, to write a history of science, or any special part thereof, is no easy task. For, in the first place the writer must know both science and history; even the most perfect under- standing of the one is inadequate for the purpose without some information of the other. Then again. he must assume a psychological detachment as a safeguard against all prejudices that tend consciously or unconsciously to exalt national or racial pride- and thus influence his judgment. The task of the present writer is, however, considerably lightened not only by the limitation of his scope to the history of chemistry in ancient and medieval India, but also by the fact that he had merely to edit and more or less revise the pioneering work, the History of Hindu Chemistry, by his illustrious teacher Acharya Prafulla Chandra' Ray. But at the same time, it must be admitted that the chronology, relating to the compilation of many ancient Indian treatises-literary, scientific or religious, is in a state of almost hopeless confusion. There is seldom any unanimity among the experts on any particular topic in this connection. The usage of ancient authors in recording the time of their composition by the period of the reign of the monarchs, under whose protection and patronage they lived and wrote, has contributed in no small measure to this confusion. Besides, there was no universally accepted era with definite origin, on the basis of which the dates could be calculated. As a result, there has been much controversy about the original source of many ideas and of the knowledge of many facts, the priority whereof might be claimed both by the Hindus and the Greeks of the early ages. It should not, however, be forgotten that one and the same idea might be conceived, or the knowledge of one and the same fact might be acquired, almost simultaneously or at slightly different periods of time by people in different countries in a perfectly independent manner. For, the evolution of human intellect is known to follow more or less the same pattern everywhere, irrespective of any geographical limitations. In the absence of any definite record of indisputable evidences," such controversies about any particular nation borrowing concepts and knowledge from the other, are obviously of little historical significance. They are likely to arouse, 'on the other hand, mere national vanities. In the present volume, the editor bas, therefore, tried to adhere to the least controversial dates after a careful consideration of the balance of reliable evidences. Moderation, rather than extremism, has been a watchword with him, but without any irrational revereuce for it. How far he has succeeded in his efforts is left to the judgment of competent authorities on the subject.

The History of Hindu Chemistry by P. C. Ray went out of print nearly a quarter of a century ago. It had been the only publication which gave a systematic account of the achievements of the early Indians in the field of chemical knowledge. As a result, the students and historians of chemistry have keenly felt the need of filling up the void created thereby. In order to meet this demand the Council of the Indian Chemical Society decided some years ago to publish a revised edition of the History of Hindu Chemistry of the late Acharya P. C. Ray, who was the Founder President of the Society. The task of editing was entrusted to the present writer. In this new volume under the name of 'History of Chemistry in Ancient and Medieval India' much new materials have been added, and all facts have been carefully sifted with a view to exclude those of doubtful origin or spurious character. Reference has also been made to the social and cultural conditions of the country, associated with the different stages of development of chemical knowledge. Evidences, supported by illustrations wherever possible, of the skill displayed by the early Indians in the art of making glazed pottery, in the extraction and working of metals, in the preparation of caustic alkalies, oxides and sulphides of metals, etc., have been recorded. It is expected that the students and historians of science will find in the book sufficient materials of interest and value for the proper assessment of the ancient Indian civilization and culture.

As in the History of Hindu Chemistry, a discussion on the decline of scientific spirit in India has been introduced in a separate chapter. The section on the mechanical, physical and chemical theories of the ancient Hindus by B. N. Seal has also been included as an appendix, though somewhat abridged from what appeared in the History of Hindu Chemistry. The original Sanskrit Texts in Devnagri script, relating to the main topics of the book, are reproduced after the appendix without any change from the History of Hindu Chemistry. This is followed by the reproduction of the Tibetan Texts in Roman script. The English translation of the Tibetan Text, Rasayanasastroddrti, which could not have been included in the main book, is also added here. The editor is deeply indebted to Sri Suniti Kumar Pathak, M.A., of Visvabharati University, Santi-Niketan, Bengal, who very kindly transcribed and translated this text from the Tibetan xylographs for the present volume.

It is indeed a great pleasure for the editor to express here his deep sense of gratitude to Professor P. K. Gode, M.A., of Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute at' Poona, who was very kind enough to go through the entire manuscript of the book and to help the editor with many valuable suggestions and useful informations. The editor also desires to record his appreciation of the great service and assistance he has received from Sri Debabrata Bose, M.A. of City College, Calcutta, in collecting new materials for the book. He further wishes to express his indebtedness to some publishers and friends for permission to use their illustrations and photographs. These are acknowledged at the appropriate places.

CONTENTS
  Introduction I
 
PREDISTORIC INDIA
 
1 Pre-Harappan Period 1
2 Indus Valley Civilization 9
 
VEDIC AND AYURVEDIC PERIOD
 
1 Vedic Period 34
2 The Constitution and Properties of Matter: Atomic Theory 40
3 Chemistry in Kautilya 49
4 Chemistry In The Charaka And The Susruta 59
5 Chemistry in the Bower Manuscript 68
6 Chemistry in the Vagbhata 70
7 Chemistry ion Practical Arts 73
 
TRANSITIONAL PERIOD
 
1 Vrinda and Chakrapani 108
 
TANTRIC PERIOD
 
1 A General Survey 113
2 Rasaratnakara of Nagarjuna 129
3 Chemistry in Rasarnava 135
4 Chemistry in Sarvesvararasayana 141
5 Chemistry in Dhatuvada 144
6 Chemistry in Rasahridaya of Bhikshu Govinda 147
7 Chemistry in Kakachanesvarinata Tantra 150
8 Chemistry in Rasendrachudamoni of Somadeva 151
9 Chemistry in Rasaprakasasudhakara of Yosodhara 153
10 Chemistry in Rasachintamani of Madanantadeva 155
11 Chemistry in Rasakalpa 156
 
IATROCHEMICAL PERIOD
 
1 A General Survey 158
2 Chemistry in Rasaratnasamuchchaya 165
3 Other Treatise 196
  Notes of the Minerals, Gems, Salts etc 201
 
CHEMISTRY IN PRACTICAL ARTS (II)
 
1 Metallurgy and working of Metals 208
2 Gun powder, Saltpetre, The Mineral Acids, Alum 225
3 Paper, Ink, Soap, Cosmetics etc 234
  Conclusion:- Decline of Scientific Spirit in India. 239
 
APPENDIX
 
  The Physicochemical Theories of the Ancient Hindus 243
 
SANSKRIT TEXTS
 
  Vrinda 309
  Rasaratnakara 311
  Rasarnava 321
  Rasahridaya 330
  Kakachandesvarimata 345
  Rasendrachudamani 351
  Rasaprakasasudhakara 355
  Rasachintamani 363
  Rasakalpa 366
  Rasaratnasamuchchaya 371
  Rasarajalakshmi 404
  Rasanakshatramalika 406
  Rasaratnakara 407
  Dhaturatnamala 409
  Rasapradipa 411
  Dhatukriya 414
 
TIBETAN TEXTS
 
  Sarvesvararasayana 449
  Dhatuvada 452
  Rasayanasastroddrti 456
  Name Index 475
  Subject Index 481

Sample Pages





















History Of Chemistry In Ancient And Medieval India: Incorporating the History of Hindu Chemistry

Item Code:
IDF731
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2014
ISBN:
8121801540
Language:
English
Size:
8.7" X 5.6"
Pages:
494
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 762 gms
Price:
$25.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
History Of Chemistry In Ancient And Medieval India: Incorporating the   History of Hindu Chemistry

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 14026 times since 3rd Aug, 2016

Foreword

As the History of Hindu Chemistry by the late Acharya Prafulla Chandra Ray, the Founder-President of the Indian Chemical Society, went out of print some two decades ago, and the necessity for its republication was being felt by all students of the history of science, the Council of the Society at one of its meetings in 1948 decided to publish a revised edition of the book. It was further resolved that the new publication should incorporate all additional important materials that had since been brought to light, and that its name should consequently be changed to "History of Chemistry in Ancient and Medieval India". A publication board comprising a few distinguished Fellows of the Society with Prof. Priyadaranjan Ray as the Editor, was constituted for the purpose, and Prof. Ray was entrusted with the task of preparing the manuscript.

As the resources of the Society were too limited to meet the cost of the publication, an appeal for financial assistance to the scheme was issued. In response to this the Society received a sum of Rs, 18,153/- as donations from various organisations. The fund has recently been augmented by a grant of Rs. 5,000/- from the Government of India.

The Society takes this opportunity of recording its grateful appreciation of the generous help received.

It was originally announced that the book would be placed before the public by the end of 1953 or in the early part of 1954, but owing to certain unforeseen circumstances over which the Society had no control, the publication has been considerably delayed. For this, the Society owes an apology to all its Donors, Fellows and Subscribers. The Society also regrets that, due to some difficulties connected with the press, some printing errors have crept into the text.

It is indeed a matter of great misfortune for the Society that one of the members of the publication board, Dr. S. S. Bhatnagar, did not live to see the publication of the book.

In spite of all its imperfections, it is hoped that the present volume will be found as useful as its original edition, the “History of Hindu Chemistry”. The Society has placed itself under a deep debt of gratitude to Prof. Priyadarnjan Ray for his painstaking and devoted work in connection with the revision and editing of this great book by the late Acharya.

Preface

History does not, as generally represented, consist merely in the shifting of geographical boundaries of countries and dominions, in the changes of their names, in the military exploits of royalties and nations, or even in the undulations and migrations of greater and lesser waves of populations. These are but the casual and external changes, and may be viewed upon as the symptoms of the great mental vicissitudes of the human race. In the opinion of many eminent thinkers, individual fortunes or individual events, by themselves, are not of real importance in history, though they may be highly sensational or of great political and economic significance for the time being and occupy the headlines of newspapers. History, from a philosophical point of view, represents, in fact, a long range process involving very long durations and very large numbers. Individual persons or events are important in history to the extent they serve as symptoms of this long range process and as means to the realization of this process. For, individuals have their rise and decay, while 'history is a continuous process and knows no end. The real history of mankind is, therefore, constituted by the thoughts of the past; the leading conceptions of all remarkable forms of civilization; the achievements of genius, of virtue and of high faith. In short, it is the record of the past experience of humanity and of the evolution of the human mind with its ideas and sentiments, its truths and toils, its virtues and guilt. The scientific and cultural achievements of mankind, representing the progress of civilization, therefore, supply the materials for real history. In fact, history becomes utterly incomplete, if it fails to narrate the progress and development of science which has led to the modern civilization with its remarkable achievements. If there be any unfailing criterion for the growth of civilization or the evolution of human mind, it lies in the progressive unification of the world to which science has undeniably made, the greatest contribution, inspite of the two frightful international conflicts on a global scale and a more intensive preparation for the third, aided by catastrophic atomic weapons derived from the pursuit of science itself. History of science, therefore, constitutes an integral part of the history of human civilization or of the true human annals of the earth; and as knowledge and wisdom grow only on the accumulated experiences of the past, it forms an essential element in the study of science itself.

But, to write a history of science, or any special part thereof, is no easy task. For, in the first place the writer must know both science and history; even the most perfect under- standing of the one is inadequate for the purpose without some information of the other. Then again. he must assume a psychological detachment as a safeguard against all prejudices that tend consciously or unconsciously to exalt national or racial pride- and thus influence his judgment. The task of the present writer is, however, considerably lightened not only by the limitation of his scope to the history of chemistry in ancient and medieval India, but also by the fact that he had merely to edit and more or less revise the pioneering work, the History of Hindu Chemistry, by his illustrious teacher Acharya Prafulla Chandra' Ray. But at the same time, it must be admitted that the chronology, relating to the compilation of many ancient Indian treatises-literary, scientific or religious, is in a state of almost hopeless confusion. There is seldom any unanimity among the experts on any particular topic in this connection. The usage of ancient authors in recording the time of their composition by the period of the reign of the monarchs, under whose protection and patronage they lived and wrote, has contributed in no small measure to this confusion. Besides, there was no universally accepted era with definite origin, on the basis of which the dates could be calculated. As a result, there has been much controversy about the original source of many ideas and of the knowledge of many facts, the priority whereof might be claimed both by the Hindus and the Greeks of the early ages. It should not, however, be forgotten that one and the same idea might be conceived, or the knowledge of one and the same fact might be acquired, almost simultaneously or at slightly different periods of time by people in different countries in a perfectly independent manner. For, the evolution of human intellect is known to follow more or less the same pattern everywhere, irrespective of any geographical limitations. In the absence of any definite record of indisputable evidences," such controversies about any particular nation borrowing concepts and knowledge from the other, are obviously of little historical significance. They are likely to arouse, 'on the other hand, mere national vanities. In the present volume, the editor bas, therefore, tried to adhere to the least controversial dates after a careful consideration of the balance of reliable evidences. Moderation, rather than extremism, has been a watchword with him, but without any irrational revereuce for it. How far he has succeeded in his efforts is left to the judgment of competent authorities on the subject.

The History of Hindu Chemistry by P. C. Ray went out of print nearly a quarter of a century ago. It had been the only publication which gave a systematic account of the achievements of the early Indians in the field of chemical knowledge. As a result, the students and historians of chemistry have keenly felt the need of filling up the void created thereby. In order to meet this demand the Council of the Indian Chemical Society decided some years ago to publish a revised edition of the History of Hindu Chemistry of the late Acharya P. C. Ray, who was the Founder President of the Society. The task of editing was entrusted to the present writer. In this new volume under the name of 'History of Chemistry in Ancient and Medieval India' much new materials have been added, and all facts have been carefully sifted with a view to exclude those of doubtful origin or spurious character. Reference has also been made to the social and cultural conditions of the country, associated with the different stages of development of chemical knowledge. Evidences, supported by illustrations wherever possible, of the skill displayed by the early Indians in the art of making glazed pottery, in the extraction and working of metals, in the preparation of caustic alkalies, oxides and sulphides of metals, etc., have been recorded. It is expected that the students and historians of science will find in the book sufficient materials of interest and value for the proper assessment of the ancient Indian civilization and culture.

As in the History of Hindu Chemistry, a discussion on the decline of scientific spirit in India has been introduced in a separate chapter. The section on the mechanical, physical and chemical theories of the ancient Hindus by B. N. Seal has also been included as an appendix, though somewhat abridged from what appeared in the History of Hindu Chemistry. The original Sanskrit Texts in Devnagri script, relating to the main topics of the book, are reproduced after the appendix without any change from the History of Hindu Chemistry. This is followed by the reproduction of the Tibetan Texts in Roman script. The English translation of the Tibetan Text, Rasayanasastroddrti, which could not have been included in the main book, is also added here. The editor is deeply indebted to Sri Suniti Kumar Pathak, M.A., of Visvabharati University, Santi-Niketan, Bengal, who very kindly transcribed and translated this text from the Tibetan xylographs for the present volume.

It is indeed a great pleasure for the editor to express here his deep sense of gratitude to Professor P. K. Gode, M.A., of Bhandarkar Oriental Research Institute at' Poona, who was very kind enough to go through the entire manuscript of the book and to help the editor with many valuable suggestions and useful informations. The editor also desires to record his appreciation of the great service and assistance he has received from Sri Debabrata Bose, M.A. of City College, Calcutta, in collecting new materials for the book. He further wishes to express his indebtedness to some publishers and friends for permission to use their illustrations and photographs. These are acknowledged at the appropriate places.

CONTENTS
  Introduction I
 
PREDISTORIC INDIA
 
1 Pre-Harappan Period 1
2 Indus Valley Civilization 9
 
VEDIC AND AYURVEDIC PERIOD
 
1 Vedic Period 34
2 The Constitution and Properties of Matter: Atomic Theory 40
3 Chemistry in Kautilya 49
4 Chemistry In The Charaka And The Susruta 59
5 Chemistry in the Bower Manuscript 68
6 Chemistry in the Vagbhata 70
7 Chemistry ion Practical Arts 73
 
TRANSITIONAL PERIOD
 
1 Vrinda and Chakrapani 108
 
TANTRIC PERIOD
 
1 A General Survey 113
2 Rasaratnakara of Nagarjuna 129
3 Chemistry in Rasarnava 135
4 Chemistry in Sarvesvararasayana 141
5 Chemistry in Dhatuvada 144
6 Chemistry in Rasahridaya of Bhikshu Govinda 147
7 Chemistry in Kakachanesvarinata Tantra 150
8 Chemistry in Rasendrachudamoni of Somadeva 151
9 Chemistry in Rasaprakasasudhakara of Yosodhara 153
10 Chemistry in Rasachintamani of Madanantadeva 155
11 Chemistry in Rasakalpa 156
 
IATROCHEMICAL PERIOD
 
1 A General Survey 158
2 Chemistry in Rasaratnasamuchchaya 165
3 Other Treatise 196
  Notes of the Minerals, Gems, Salts etc 201
 
CHEMISTRY IN PRACTICAL ARTS (II)
 
1 Metallurgy and working of Metals 208
2 Gun powder, Saltpetre, The Mineral Acids, Alum 225
3 Paper, Ink, Soap, Cosmetics etc 234
  Conclusion:- Decline of Scientific Spirit in India. 239
 
APPENDIX
 
  The Physicochemical Theories of the Ancient Hindus 243
 
SANSKRIT TEXTS
 
  Vrinda 309
  Rasaratnakara 311
  Rasarnava 321
  Rasahridaya 330
  Kakachandesvarimata 345
  Rasendrachudamani 351
  Rasaprakasasudhakara 355
  Rasachintamani 363
  Rasakalpa 366
  Rasaratnasamuchchaya 371
  Rasarajalakshmi 404
  Rasanakshatramalika 406
  Rasaratnakara 407
  Dhaturatnamala 409
  Rasapradipa 411
  Dhatukriya 414
 
TIBETAN TEXTS
 
  Sarvesvararasayana 449
  Dhatuvada 452
  Rasayanasastroddrti 456
  Name Index 475
  Subject Index 481

Sample Pages





















Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Glossary Of Chemistry (English-Hindi)
Item Code: NAG931
$80.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
From Physiology and Chemistry to Biochemistry
Item Code: NAD332
$90.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
OCCULT CHEMISTRY
Item Code: IDG144
$60.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Chemistry and Pharmacology of Ayurvedic Medicinal Plants
Item Code: IDH556
$105.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Chemistry and Chemical Techniques in India
Item Code: NAD682
$60.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Medicinal of Plants India and Ceylon: Their chemistry and pharmacology
by J. P. C. CHANDRASENA
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
ASIATIC PUBLISHING HOUSE
Item Code: IDG222
$40.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

To my astonishment and joy, your book arrived (quicker than the speed of light) today with no further adoo concerning customs. I am very pleased and grateful.
Christine, the Netherlands
You have excellent books!!
Jorge, USA.
You have a very interesting collection of books. Great job! And the ordering is easy and the books are not expensive. Great!
Ketil, Norway
I just wanted to thank you for being so helpful and wonderful to work with. My artwork arrived exquisitely framed, and I am anxious to get it up on the walls of my house. I am truly grateful to have discovered your website. All of the items I’ve received have been truly lovely.
Katherine, USA
I have received yesterday a parcel with the ordered books. Thanks for the fast delivery through DHL! I will surely order for other books in the future.
Ravindra, the Netherlands
My order has been delivered today. Thanks for your excellent customer services. I really appreciate that. I hope to see you again. Good luck.
Ankush, Australia
I just love shopping with Exotic India.
Delia, USA.
Fantastic products, fantastic service, something for every budget.
LB, United Kingdom
I love this web site and love coming to see what you have online.
Glenn, Australia
Received package today, thank you! Love how everything was packed, I especially enjoyed the fabric covering! Thank you for all you do!
Frances, Austin, Texas
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India