Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
Share
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Great Shawls Sale... 25% + 10% off on all shawls, stoles and scarves
Books > Language and Literature > Lie: A Traditional Tale of Modern India (A Unique Comic Book)
Displaying 3650 of 4419         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Lie: A Traditional Tale of Modern India (A Unique Comic Book)
Lie: A Traditional Tale of Modern India (A Unique Comic Book)
Description
Back of the Book

In lie a traditional tale of modern India a broad picture book narrative that is part soap opera and part family melodrama critic and satirist Gautam Bhatia lays every Indian stereotype open to question that good always triumphs over evil that truth vanquishes falsehood that the poor will ride roughshod over the rich that the powerful politician will sooner than later be brought to his knees by the ordinary man.

The graphic novel looks at issues personalities, people and ideas that project the popularly held view of the country. Its characters interact with each other in a way that gives vent to a range of popular and suppressed prejudices desires taboos and age old injustices that dog the life of every Indian. A sardonic look at the current state of affairs in the country using a traditional form of expression lie has been drawn by miniaturists from Rajasthan.

Introduction

A Delhi flower seller provides an array of colors Tulips from Holland purple gladioli from Himachal. All seeded and grafted from some of the world’s most delicate hybrids. The sale occurs against the stench filled wall of a suburban market’s urinal. Aspects of beauty mingle freely with waste and decay in daily encounters. The India that is revealed to us is one of ironic contradictions and surreal paradoxes. It strikes neither the middle class housewife buying followers for the puja room nor a shop owner using the urinal. That the other proximity of their actions contaminates the other similarly union carbide will not settle the death claims of a gas tragedy but continues to display its philanthropy in the maintenance of flowered and manicured traffic islands in Bombay. In the Indian mind the visible expression of Philanthropy far exceeds actual philanthropy just the way a seminar on communal harmony invariably outweighs actual communal Harmony or the rewriting of history books becomes a legitimate method of imparting government education to school children.

In the daily life of the country are signs that convey a sense of collective tolerance there is an Islamic tomb in the old neighborhood. An illegal Hindu temple is being regularized down the road. A delegation of Buddhist monks is attending a peace conference the day to day signals conduct governs the passing of each day. But the passive individual given to the ritual of secularism in his won life becomes rabidly fanatical when part of the larger collective of his own community. Every bit of pious rhetoric invariably carries its undertones of violence contradictions abound. Asceticism and religious intolerance go hand in hand as do caste and inequality and people struggle with the paradox of belong feminists and duty bound wives untouchables and free citizens in society western concepts are adsorbed and mingle freely with traditional ideas often themselves heal baked or fractured wherever you go every turn or incident or meeting reinforces your position you are reminded of your deprivations your opportunities in your sightline is someone worthy of emulation. Someone else in a state of humiliation another in desperation the proximity of such reminders baffle and make you acutely aware of all the social political and economic collisions that are waiting to happen to you in your life in the life in India.

Unhoused millions child labor wife beating gas tragedies nuclear threats delinquent leaders degraded forests all put the future of the country low on the list of public expectation. Unable to deliver comic relief becomes the only tool to assuage the guilt of visible unrelenting tragedy lie is a graphic novel down by miniaturist artists from Rajasthan. It is an attempt to satirize the current state of affairs within the country using a traditional from of expression. Lie looks at issues personalities people and ideas that project the popularly held view of India the story reaches out to encompass a wide range of stereotypes from politics film religion cricket and family life. Is characters interact with each other in a way that gives vent to a range of popular and suppressed prejudices desires taboos and injustices that mark the life of the ordinary Indian. Lie is meant to act as a form of corrective measure to the real India offering a set of intellectual lenses behind which lies something to today’s morality lie is a tale of a tainted idealism afloat in a despotic nightmare of ordinary life. A story of armless beggars conspiring bureaucrats dements politicians and crooked businessman of meeting and seminars with no express intent riots and conflicts. An exaggerated view of people driven t grotesque levels of greed and indulging in heinous acts of depravity and danbarism if their life is a lie so too the story

Lie: A Traditional Tale of Modern India (A Unique Comic Book)

Item Code:
IHK013
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2010
Publisher:
Tranquebar Press (Westland Books)
ISBN:
9789380283739
Size:
9.5 Inch X 6.7 Inch
Pages:
181 (Illustrated Throughout In Full Colors
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 300 gms
Price:
$30.00
Discounted:
$22.50   Shipping Free
You Save:
$7.50 (25%)
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Lie: A Traditional Tale of Modern India (A Unique Comic Book)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 4914 times since 20th Jun, 2010
Back of the Book

In lie a traditional tale of modern India a broad picture book narrative that is part soap opera and part family melodrama critic and satirist Gautam Bhatia lays every Indian stereotype open to question that good always triumphs over evil that truth vanquishes falsehood that the poor will ride roughshod over the rich that the powerful politician will sooner than later be brought to his knees by the ordinary man.

The graphic novel looks at issues personalities, people and ideas that project the popularly held view of the country. Its characters interact with each other in a way that gives vent to a range of popular and suppressed prejudices desires taboos and age old injustices that dog the life of every Indian. A sardonic look at the current state of affairs in the country using a traditional form of expression lie has been drawn by miniaturists from Rajasthan.

Introduction

A Delhi flower seller provides an array of colors Tulips from Holland purple gladioli from Himachal. All seeded and grafted from some of the world’s most delicate hybrids. The sale occurs against the stench filled wall of a suburban market’s urinal. Aspects of beauty mingle freely with waste and decay in daily encounters. The India that is revealed to us is one of ironic contradictions and surreal paradoxes. It strikes neither the middle class housewife buying followers for the puja room nor a shop owner using the urinal. That the other proximity of their actions contaminates the other similarly union carbide will not settle the death claims of a gas tragedy but continues to display its philanthropy in the maintenance of flowered and manicured traffic islands in Bombay. In the Indian mind the visible expression of Philanthropy far exceeds actual philanthropy just the way a seminar on communal harmony invariably outweighs actual communal Harmony or the rewriting of history books becomes a legitimate method of imparting government education to school children.

In the daily life of the country are signs that convey a sense of collective tolerance there is an Islamic tomb in the old neighborhood. An illegal Hindu temple is being regularized down the road. A delegation of Buddhist monks is attending a peace conference the day to day signals conduct governs the passing of each day. But the passive individual given to the ritual of secularism in his won life becomes rabidly fanatical when part of the larger collective of his own community. Every bit of pious rhetoric invariably carries its undertones of violence contradictions abound. Asceticism and religious intolerance go hand in hand as do caste and inequality and people struggle with the paradox of belong feminists and duty bound wives untouchables and free citizens in society western concepts are adsorbed and mingle freely with traditional ideas often themselves heal baked or fractured wherever you go every turn or incident or meeting reinforces your position you are reminded of your deprivations your opportunities in your sightline is someone worthy of emulation. Someone else in a state of humiliation another in desperation the proximity of such reminders baffle and make you acutely aware of all the social political and economic collisions that are waiting to happen to you in your life in the life in India.

Unhoused millions child labor wife beating gas tragedies nuclear threats delinquent leaders degraded forests all put the future of the country low on the list of public expectation. Unable to deliver comic relief becomes the only tool to assuage the guilt of visible unrelenting tragedy lie is a graphic novel down by miniaturist artists from Rajasthan. It is an attempt to satirize the current state of affairs within the country using a traditional from of expression. Lie looks at issues personalities people and ideas that project the popularly held view of India the story reaches out to encompass a wide range of stereotypes from politics film religion cricket and family life. Is characters interact with each other in a way that gives vent to a range of popular and suppressed prejudices desires taboos and injustices that mark the life of the ordinary Indian. Lie is meant to act as a form of corrective measure to the real India offering a set of intellectual lenses behind which lies something to today’s morality lie is a tale of a tainted idealism afloat in a despotic nightmare of ordinary life. A story of armless beggars conspiring bureaucrats dements politicians and crooked businessman of meeting and seminars with no express intent riots and conflicts. An exaggerated view of people driven t grotesque levels of greed and indulging in heinous acts of depravity and danbarism if their life is a lie so too the story

Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

The Making Of Modern India: The Cultural Heritage of India (1765-1947) (Volume VIII )
by Dr. Sukumar Bhattacharyya and Dr. Uma Das Gupta
Hardcover (Edition: 2011)
The Ramakrishna Mission Institute of Culture
Item Code: NAF392
$60.00$45.00
You save: $15.00 (25%)
The Oxford India Anthology of Twelve Modern Indian Poets
by Ed. By. Arvind Krishna Mehrotra
Paperback (Edition: 2003)
Oxford India Paperbacks
Item Code: IDD658
$19.00$14.25
You save: $4.75 (25%)
The Oxford India Anthology of Modern Urdu Literature {Fiction}
by Mehr Afshan Farooqi
Hardcover (Edition: 2008)
Oxford University Press
Item Code: IDK150
$45.00$33.75
You save: $11.25 (25%)
A Biography of Swami Vivekananda (The Prophet of Modern India)
by Gautam Ghosh
Paperback (Edition: 2003)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDD946
$26.00$19.50
You save: $6.50 (25%)
When was Modernism: Essays on Contemporary Cultural Practice in India
by Geeta Kapur
Paperback (Edition: 2000)
Tulika Books
Item Code: IDF603
$60.00$45.00
You save: $15.00 (25%)
La Aldea Y La Ciudad Antologia de cuentos de la literatura moderna de la India Seleccion y traduccion de Alvaro Enterria
Paperback (Edition: 1998)
Indica
Item Code: IHH026
$37.50$28.12
You save: $9.38 (25%)
The Oxford India Anthology of Modern Urdu Literature (Poetry and Prose Miscellany)
by Mehr Afshan Farooqi
Hardcover (Edition: 2008)
Oxford University Press
Item Code: IDK144
$50.00$37.50
You save: $12.50 (25%)
THE OXFORD ANTHOLOGY OF MODERN INDIAN POETRY
by Vinay Dharwadker and ED. BY: A. K. Ramanujan
Paperback (Edition: 2002)
Oxford India Paperbacks
Item Code: IDD650
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
The Renovation of Folktales (By Five Modern Bengali Writers)
by Bansari Mitra
Paperback (Edition: 2002)
Anthropological Survey of India
Item Code: NAF172
$15.00$11.25
You save: $3.75 (25%)
Modern Literary Nepali A introductory Reader
by Michael J. Hutt
Paperback (Edition: 2004)
Oxford India Paperbacks
Item Code: IDH151
$17.00$12.75
You save: $4.25 (25%)
The Penguin Book of Modern Indian Short Stories
by Stephen Alter and Wimal Dissanayake
Paperback (Edition: 2001)
Penguin Books
Item Code: IHL568
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
Modern Indian Poetry in English
by Bruce King
Paperback (Edition: 2015)
Oxford University Press
Item Code: NAL908
$30.00$22.50
You save: $7.50 (25%)
LGBTQ: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (Identities in Select Modern Indian Literature)
by Kuhu Sharma Chanana
Hardcover (Edition: 2015)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAK754
$55.00$41.25
You save: $13.75 (25%)

Testimonials

I have been your customer for many years and everything has always been A++++++++++++ quality.
Delia, USA
I am your customer for many years. I love your products. Thanks for sending high quality products.
Nata, USA
I have been a customer for many years due to the quality products and service.
Mr. Hartley, UK.
Got the package on 9th Nov. I have to say it was one of the excellent packaging I have seen, worth my money I paid. And the books where all in best new conditions as they can be.
Nabahat, Bikaner
Whatever we bought from Exotic India has been wonderful. Excellent transaction,very reasonable price excellent delivery. We bought so many huge statues, clothes, decorative items, jewels etc. Every item was packed with love.
Tom and Roma Florida USA
Namaste. I want to thank you as I have received the statue and I shall always remember the service provided to such good standards.
Dr. B. Saha, UK
I received my Green Tara statue today and it's absolutely lovely, much nicer than I'd hoped--thank you so much for arranging its manufacture for me!
Betsy, California
Parcel received is brilliantly packed by your dispatch team. Excellent collection, beautiful Micro-art work. The items are exactly same as displayed. Hats-off to the collection team. The shiva linga Ring & Garuda pendant were superb. Its pleasure shopping every time. God bless your team with good energy to continue this Real collection work.
Badarinath, India
Jamavar arrived so quickly and is beautiful, thank you!
Caro
Your service is exceptional. I am very pleased with your professionalism.
Shambhu, USA
TRUSTe online privacy certification
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2016 © Exotic India