Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Philosophy > Logic > Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy
Displaying 2384 of 2830         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy
Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy
Description
From the Jacket

The present volume explores a theme which has so far rarely received the attention it legitimately deserves, although its fundamental importance to proper understanding of the true nature of Indian philosophical enquiry and intellectual heritage seems unquestionable. Whether in Indian social and historical context or throughout the history of Western thought, the relation between logic, belief and philosophy have always been very complex and multifaceted.

The general theme of the enquiry presented here is adequately reflected in the title of the volume: Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy, which aptly highlights the yukti-agama dimension. In particular, it focuses on various aspects of Indian thought, and Indian logic in particular, with special emphasis on the relationship, and tension, between rational examination and belief in Indian Philosophical tradition.

The contributions are grouped in thematic sections, the titles of which are self-explanatory. Some articles probe deeply into very detailed and intricate doctrinal aspects of selected Brahmanical philosophical schools and of Jaina and Buddhist traditions, whereas others attempt synthetic conclusions as well as methodological and theoretical reflection concerning the very nature of Indian philosophy and its religious background. The reader will also find as English translation of ‘The chapter on the negative-only inference’ (Kevala-vyatireki-prakarana) of Gangesa’s Tattva-cinta-mani, a ground-breaking work that revolutionized medieval Indian Logic.

Piotr Balcerowicz of no nationality (which he emphasizes), presently at the Institute of Oriental Studies, Warsaw University, Poland, specializes in Indian Philosophical tradition, with emphasis on Jainism; he teaches Sanskrit and Prakrits, and lectures on Indian philosophy and religions and contemporary history of Asia. He published extensively on Indian philosophy, and also on he Middle East and Central Asia in Polish, English and German, and authored a number of books on Indian philosophy, Jainism and history Afghanistan. Some of them are Essays in Indian Philosophy, Religion and Literature (with Marek Mejor), Essays in Jaina Philosophy and Religion, Jain Epistemology in Historical and Comparative Perspective (Two Vols.)

Preface

The present volume explores a theme which has so far rarely received the attention it legitimately deserves, although its fundamental importance to proper understanding of the true nature of Indian philosophical enquiry and intellectual heritage seems unquestionable. Whether in Indian social and historical context or throughout the history of Western thought, the relations between logic, belief and philosophy have always been very complex and multifaceted.

The general theme of the enquiry presented here is adequately reflected in the title of the volume: Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy, which aptly highlights the yukti-agama dimension. In particular, it focuses on various aspects of Indian thought, and Indian logic in particular, with special emphasis on the relationship, and tension, between rational examination and belief in Indian philosophical tradition.

The selection of papers by world-acclaimed specialists in Indian philosophy deals with a broad spectrum of problems such as the real nature and status of reason and faith in India, their rational, or otherwise, grounding or the extent to which their correlation is bipolar or interdependent. A number of vital philosophical questions stimulated the discussion in the volume: Can we speak of the symbiosix or, rather, tension between philosophy, logic in particular, and religion in Indian context? How do sound proof and irrefutable evidence relate to the bequeathed body of dogmas? To what degree did Indian thinkers consider logical me and of enquiry independent of belief? How can logic itself be rationally validated without a recourse to assumptions sanctioned by tradition and belief? What is the place of skepticism or mystic experience vis-à-vis rational method and logical tools? How did Indian logicians try pramana? These questions do not only concern the relationship between the phenomena of religiosity and religion, on the one hand, and rationality and rational justification, on the other. They are also applicable to the spheres of ritual, religious-social practices, or even gambling, as well as to various ways of now behavior and religious acts were rationalized.

The contributions were grouped in thematic sections, the title of which are self-exlanatory. Some articles probe deeply into very detailed and intricate doctrinal traditions whereas other attempt synthetic conclusions as well as methodological and theoretical reflection concerning the very nature of Indian philosophy and its religious background. The reader will also find an English translation of ‘The chapter on the negative-only inference’ (Kevala-vyatireki-prakarana) of Gangesa’s Tattvacinta-mani, a ground-breaking work that revolutionized mediaeval Indian logic.

Some of these contributions were directly presented by the author during the International Seminar ‘Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy - The Impact of Indian Thought in Asia and Europe’ (for the programme see below, p.9), held between 30 April and 5 May 2006 in Bialowieza, one the most beautiful and picturesque spots in Poland, in the heart of the great Bialowieza Forest, supposedly the largest primeval forest in Europe. The Seminar ‘Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy’ was organized by Marek Major, Monika Nowakowska and Piotr Balcerowicz.

On this occasion, on behalf of the organizers of the Seminar, I would like to extend most sincere thanks to UNESCO, to the Polish National Commision for UNESCO, and the Rector of the University of Warsaw for their much appreciated financial support, without which the Seminar could not have taken place.

I also wish to express my deepest gratitude to my colleagues Marek Mejor and Monika Nowakowska of the Faculty of Oriental Studies, the University of Warsaw, for their organizational efforts that made the Seminar possible.

The present volume appears as Volume Three of the Series Warsaw Indological Studies by the arrangement with Motilal Banarsidass Private Limited, Delhi. When I met my friend Narendra Prakash Jain, the Director of Motilal Banarsidass, in December 2006 and mentioned the plans to publish the proceedings of the Seminar ‘Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy’, he enthusiastically greeted the idea. I personally feel deeply obliged to him for his readiness to accept the publication for print and his efforts to make the contributions included in this volume available to a wider readership.

Contents

Preface 7
MYTH, BELIEF AND APPEAL TO RATIONALITY
Johannes Bronkhorst:
What did Indian Philosophers Believe? 13
Claus Oetke:
Pramana, Logic and Belief 39
Raghunath Ghosh:
Can There be Unbiased Epistemology in Indian Philosophy? 65
Peter Flugel:
Power and Insight in Jain Discourse 79
GOD VIS-À-VIS PROOF AND BELIEF
Fernando Tola and Carmen Dragonetti:
The Distinction in intellectu / in re in the Ontological Proof and in Bhartrhari 213
John Vattanky, S.J.:
Theism-The Culmination of Nyaya Logic 229
Piotr Balcerowicz:
What Exists for the Vaisesika? 241
LOGIC AND BELIEF IN SAMKHYA AND YOGA
Shujun Motegi:
Early Concepts of Logic in Samkhya 351
Philipp A. Maas:
Valid Knowledge and Belief in Classical Samkhya-Yoga 371
LANGUAGE, GRAMMAR AND BELIEF
Ashok Aklujkar:
Grammarians’ Leaving Logic at the Door 383
Hideyo Ogawa:
Bhartrhari on Unnameable things 403
LOGIC AND BELIEF IN INTERPRETATION AND TRANSLATION
Diwakar Acharya:
Major Points of Vacaspati’s Disagreement with Mandana 421
Stephen H. Phillips:
From the Tattva-cinta-mani by Gangesa: The kevala-vyatireki-prakaranam: Negative-Only Inference (Annotated Translation and Commentary)435
LOGIC, REALITY AND BELIEF IN BUDDHIST TRADITION
Horst Lasic:
A Hot Dispute About Lukewarm air: Dignaga on Apta-vada 509
Dan Arnold:
On (Non-semantically) Remembering Conventions: Dharmakirti and Dharmottara on Samketa-kala 527
Vincent Eltschinger:
Studies in Dharmakirti’s Religious Philosophy: 4. The Cinta-mayi Prajna 553
Klaus-Dieter Mathes:
The Principle of True Nature (dharmata-yukti) as a Justification for Positive Descriptions of Reality in Mahayana Buddhism 593
Hiroshi Nemoto:
Tsong kha pa on the Three Times: New Light on the Buddhist Theory of Time 605
Kaoru Onishi:
The Bodhi-caryavatara and Its Monastic Aspects: On the Problem of Representation 615
BELIEF, HOPE AND GAMBLING
Irma Piovano:
Sociological and Juridical Aspects of Dice-Play in Ancient India645
GENERAL INDEX 663

Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy

Item Code:
IHL045
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2010
ISBN:
9788120834460
Size:
8.8 inch X 5.8 inch
Pages:
685
Other Details:
a51_books
Price:
$55.00   Shipping Free - 4 to 6 days
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 5872 times since 31st Jul, 2010
From the Jacket

The present volume explores a theme which has so far rarely received the attention it legitimately deserves, although its fundamental importance to proper understanding of the true nature of Indian philosophical enquiry and intellectual heritage seems unquestionable. Whether in Indian social and historical context or throughout the history of Western thought, the relation between logic, belief and philosophy have always been very complex and multifaceted.

The general theme of the enquiry presented here is adequately reflected in the title of the volume: Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy, which aptly highlights the yukti-agama dimension. In particular, it focuses on various aspects of Indian thought, and Indian logic in particular, with special emphasis on the relationship, and tension, between rational examination and belief in Indian Philosophical tradition.

The contributions are grouped in thematic sections, the titles of which are self-explanatory. Some articles probe deeply into very detailed and intricate doctrinal aspects of selected Brahmanical philosophical schools and of Jaina and Buddhist traditions, whereas others attempt synthetic conclusions as well as methodological and theoretical reflection concerning the very nature of Indian philosophy and its religious background. The reader will also find as English translation of ‘The chapter on the negative-only inference’ (Kevala-vyatireki-prakarana) of Gangesa’s Tattva-cinta-mani, a ground-breaking work that revolutionized medieval Indian Logic.

Piotr Balcerowicz of no nationality (which he emphasizes), presently at the Institute of Oriental Studies, Warsaw University, Poland, specializes in Indian Philosophical tradition, with emphasis on Jainism; he teaches Sanskrit and Prakrits, and lectures on Indian philosophy and religions and contemporary history of Asia. He published extensively on Indian philosophy, and also on he Middle East and Central Asia in Polish, English and German, and authored a number of books on Indian philosophy, Jainism and history Afghanistan. Some of them are Essays in Indian Philosophy, Religion and Literature (with Marek Mejor), Essays in Jaina Philosophy and Religion, Jain Epistemology in Historical and Comparative Perspective (Two Vols.)

Preface

The present volume explores a theme which has so far rarely received the attention it legitimately deserves, although its fundamental importance to proper understanding of the true nature of Indian philosophical enquiry and intellectual heritage seems unquestionable. Whether in Indian social and historical context or throughout the history of Western thought, the relations between logic, belief and philosophy have always been very complex and multifaceted.

The general theme of the enquiry presented here is adequately reflected in the title of the volume: Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy, which aptly highlights the yukti-agama dimension. In particular, it focuses on various aspects of Indian thought, and Indian logic in particular, with special emphasis on the relationship, and tension, between rational examination and belief in Indian philosophical tradition.

The selection of papers by world-acclaimed specialists in Indian philosophy deals with a broad spectrum of problems such as the real nature and status of reason and faith in India, their rational, or otherwise, grounding or the extent to which their correlation is bipolar or interdependent. A number of vital philosophical questions stimulated the discussion in the volume: Can we speak of the symbiosix or, rather, tension between philosophy, logic in particular, and religion in Indian context? How do sound proof and irrefutable evidence relate to the bequeathed body of dogmas? To what degree did Indian thinkers consider logical me and of enquiry independent of belief? How can logic itself be rationally validated without a recourse to assumptions sanctioned by tradition and belief? What is the place of skepticism or mystic experience vis-à-vis rational method and logical tools? How did Indian logicians try pramana? These questions do not only concern the relationship between the phenomena of religiosity and religion, on the one hand, and rationality and rational justification, on the other. They are also applicable to the spheres of ritual, religious-social practices, or even gambling, as well as to various ways of now behavior and religious acts were rationalized.

The contributions were grouped in thematic sections, the title of which are self-exlanatory. Some articles probe deeply into very detailed and intricate doctrinal traditions whereas other attempt synthetic conclusions as well as methodological and theoretical reflection concerning the very nature of Indian philosophy and its religious background. The reader will also find an English translation of ‘The chapter on the negative-only inference’ (Kevala-vyatireki-prakarana) of Gangesa’s Tattvacinta-mani, a ground-breaking work that revolutionized mediaeval Indian logic.

Some of these contributions were directly presented by the author during the International Seminar ‘Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy - The Impact of Indian Thought in Asia and Europe’ (for the programme see below, p.9), held between 30 April and 5 May 2006 in Bialowieza, one the most beautiful and picturesque spots in Poland, in the heart of the great Bialowieza Forest, supposedly the largest primeval forest in Europe. The Seminar ‘Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy’ was organized by Marek Major, Monika Nowakowska and Piotr Balcerowicz.

On this occasion, on behalf of the organizers of the Seminar, I would like to extend most sincere thanks to UNESCO, to the Polish National Commision for UNESCO, and the Rector of the University of Warsaw for their much appreciated financial support, without which the Seminar could not have taken place.

I also wish to express my deepest gratitude to my colleagues Marek Mejor and Monika Nowakowska of the Faculty of Oriental Studies, the University of Warsaw, for their organizational efforts that made the Seminar possible.

The present volume appears as Volume Three of the Series Warsaw Indological Studies by the arrangement with Motilal Banarsidass Private Limited, Delhi. When I met my friend Narendra Prakash Jain, the Director of Motilal Banarsidass, in December 2006 and mentioned the plans to publish the proceedings of the Seminar ‘Logic and Belief in Indian Philosophy’, he enthusiastically greeted the idea. I personally feel deeply obliged to him for his readiness to accept the publication for print and his efforts to make the contributions included in this volume available to a wider readership.

Contents

Preface 7
MYTH, BELIEF AND APPEAL TO RATIONALITY
Johannes Bronkhorst:
What did Indian Philosophers Believe? 13
Claus Oetke:
Pramana, Logic and Belief 39
Raghunath Ghosh:
Can There be Unbiased Epistemology in Indian Philosophy? 65
Peter Flugel:
Power and Insight in Jain Discourse 79
GOD VIS-À-VIS PROOF AND BELIEF
Fernando Tola and Carmen Dragonetti:
The Distinction in intellectu / in re in the Ontological Proof and in Bhartrhari 213
John Vattanky, S.J.:
Theism-The Culmination of Nyaya Logic 229
Piotr Balcerowicz:
What Exists for the Vaisesika? 241
LOGIC AND BELIEF IN SAMKHYA AND YOGA
Shujun Motegi:
Early Concepts of Logic in Samkhya 351
Philipp A. Maas:
Valid Knowledge and Belief in Classical Samkhya-Yoga 371
LANGUAGE, GRAMMAR AND BELIEF
Ashok Aklujkar:
Grammarians’ Leaving Logic at the Door 383
Hideyo Ogawa:
Bhartrhari on Unnameable things 403
LOGIC AND BELIEF IN INTERPRETATION AND TRANSLATION
Diwakar Acharya:
Major Points of Vacaspati’s Disagreement with Mandana 421
Stephen H. Phillips:
From the Tattva-cinta-mani by Gangesa: The kevala-vyatireki-prakaranam: Negative-Only Inference (Annotated Translation and Commentary)435
LOGIC, REALITY AND BELIEF IN BUDDHIST TRADITION
Horst Lasic:
A Hot Dispute About Lukewarm air: Dignaga on Apta-vada 509
Dan Arnold:
On (Non-semantically) Remembering Conventions: Dharmakirti and Dharmottara on Samketa-kala 527
Vincent Eltschinger:
Studies in Dharmakirti’s Religious Philosophy: 4. The Cinta-mayi Prajna 553
Klaus-Dieter Mathes:
The Principle of True Nature (dharmata-yukti) as a Justification for Positive Descriptions of Reality in Mahayana Buddhism 593
Hiroshi Nemoto:
Tsong kha pa on the Three Times: New Light on the Buddhist Theory of Time 605
Kaoru Onishi:
The Bodhi-caryavatara and Its Monastic Aspects: On the Problem of Representation 615
BELIEF, HOPE AND GAMBLING
Irma Piovano:
Sociological and Juridical Aspects of Dice-Play in Ancient India645
GENERAL INDEX 663
Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Based on your browsing history

Loading... Please wait

Related Items

THE PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE: Facets of Recent Indian Philosophy
Item Code: IDH021
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Buddhist Logic (2 Vols.)
Item Code: IDC857
$70.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Paradigms of Logic in Dharmakirti's Nyayabindu
Item Code: NAH452
$20.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Pre-Dinnaga Buddhist Texts On Logic From Chinese Sources
by Giuseppe Tucci
Paperback (Edition: 1998)
Pilgrims Books House, Nepal
Item Code: IDI636
$29.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Vadanyaya of Dharmakirti - The Logic of Debate
by Pradeep P. Gokhale
Hardcover (Edition: 1993)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: NAC682
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

Thank you for this wonderful New Year sale!
Michael, USA
Many Thanks for all Your superb quality Artworks at unbeatable prices. We have been recommending EI to friends & family for over 5 yrs & will continue to do so fervently. Cheers
Dara, Canada
Thank you for your wonderful selection of books and art work. I am a regular customer and always appreciate the excellent items you offer and your great service.
Lars, USA
Colis bien reçu, emballage excellent et statue conforme aux attentes. Du bon travail, je reviendrai sur votre site !
Alain, France
GREAT SITE. SANSKRIT AND HINDI LINGUISTICS IS MY PASSION. AND I THANK YOU FOR THIS SITE.
Madhu, USA
I love your site and although today is my first order, I have been seeing your site for the past several years. Thank you for providing such great art and books to people around the World who can't make it to India as often as we would like.
Rupesh
Heramba Ganapati arrived safely today and was shipped promptly. Another fantastic find from Exotic India with perfect customer service. Thank you. Jai Ganesha Deva
Marc, UK
I ordered Padmapani Statue. I have received my statue. The delivering process was very fast and the statue looks so beautiful. Thank you exoticindia, Mr. Vipin (customer care). I am very satisfied.
Hartono, Indonesia
Very easy to buy, great site! Thanks
Ilda, Brazil
Our Nandi sculpture arrived today and it surpasses all expectations - it is wonderful. We are not only pleasantly surprised by the speed of international delivery but also are extremely grateful for the care of your packaging. Our sculpture needed to travel to an off-lying island of New Zealand but it arrived safely because of how well it had been packaged. Based upon my experience of all aspects of your service, I have no hesitation in recommending Exotic India.
BWM, NZ
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2018 © Exotic India