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Manthanabhairavatantram Kumarikakhandah (The Section Concerning the Virgin Goddess of the Tantra of the Churning Bhairava In 

Fourteen Volumes)
Manthanabhairavatantram Kumarikakhandah (The Section Concerning the Virgin Goddess of the Tantra of the Churning Bhairava In Fourteen Volumes)
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From the Jacket

The Manthanabhairavatantra is about 24,000 verses long and is divided into three section (Khanda). The one edited and translated here is the Kumarikakhanda. Along with the Kubjikamata, the Manthanabhairavatantra is the most important and extensive Tantra dedicated to the worship of the goddess Kubjika. Although originally an Indian goddess, Kubjika is almost exclusively worshiped in the Kathmandu valley, where her cult has been kept scrupulously secret by Newar initiates for centuries. Almost all the manuscripts of her Tantras and related literature have been found there.

Kubjika is a powerful development of Malini, the principal goddess of the Trika Tantras and Kali of the Kashmiri Krama tradition. Her cult belongs to a chain of early Kaula systems that culminate with that of the goddess Tripura and so sheds considerable light on them. Kubjika's unique historical importance is mirrored in the extraordinary richness of the inner, spiritual dimensions of her cult. These are explored in detail in the introduction the edition and translation of the text with extensive references from mostly unpublished Kubjika Tantras and those of related schools.

The work took close to two decades to produce. In this time numerous working editions of unpublished Tantras and related texts were prepared by the author with the help of a team of five trained assistants.

 

About the Author

Mark Dyczkowski was born in London in 1951. After completing his schooling in 1969 he went to India for his spiritual development and to study Sanskrit, Indian philosophy and music. After receiving his first degrees from Banaras Hindu University in 1975, he returned to England for his doctoral research at the University of Oxford in Kashmiri Saiviam. He is well known for his publication in this field. Since 1979 he has continued to work and live in India. He was been associated with the IGNCA Since 1993. At present he supervises and contributes to the input of an on-line digital library of Tantric texts for Muktabodha Ideological Research Institute. The site muktabodha. Com. Recordings of his lectures on Kashmiri Saivism and some of his publication can be downloaded from his site markdkshi.com.

 

Acknowledgements

Reflecting on over 35 year of study during most of which I have had the great good fortune to live in India, the Holy Land of the Rsis, Siddhas and Yoginis, I cannot escape the feeling that a mighty Divine power has guided my life. Any acknowledgment of help received or inspiration must begin for me with a sense of profound gratitude to the one infinite Being who sustains and is both the origin and final and of all things. Nowadays, in this modern secular world such declarations seem improper and contrary to the spirit of detached objectivity the serious academic research demands. Nonetheless, bound as a scholar by the moral duty it acknowledges my sources and those who have assisted me and taught me, I cannot do otherwise. Where it not for that impulse, inscrutable as it is powerful that sent me from England, my native land, to india in 1968 and to the many people I was fortunate to meet there who taught and guided me, the volumes the reader has before him would not exist.

Amongst the many come to mind I can only mention a few, the first of whom is the late Pt. Ambikadatta Upadhyaya at whose feet I was introduced to the Sanskrit language and the marvels of the world of Sanskrit literature. Pt. Hemendranatha Cakravarti, renowned disciple of the great Mahamahopadhyaya Gopinath Kaviraj, opened the door the allowed me to enter the glorious realms of Kashmiri Saivism. Subsequently, the revered Kashmiri master, swami Laksmanjoo sealed my quest with his initiation and divinely inspired teachings. Words cannot express the good fortune of a person who was has had the chance to sit at the feet of a fully realised soul and study from him. While Swamiji was a great master in inner practice in Nepal I was introduced into the vast and complex the purohitas and Tantric gurus of the Malla kings of Bhaktapur. Kedararaja generously gave me his time and courageously braved the possible consequences of transmitting such matters outside the circle of his initiates.

Pt. Vrajavallabha Dvivedi, former head of the Yogatantra Department at Sampurnaanda Sankrit University, has been an abiding source of inexhaustible knowledge. Indeed his work is formidable ranging as it does through virtually every major Tantric tradition including not only Kashmiri Saivism, but also Saiva Siddhhanta, Vira Saivism, Srividya and the Kaula Tantrism.

In other areas of study I cannot but recall with gratitude Pt. B.P. Tripathi, better known as Vagisa Sastri, former Director of the Research Department Sampurnananda Sanskrit University, who laboured for years to each me Sanskrit grammar both in the traditional manner and through his own didactic method.

Although I have not studied formally with Prof. K.D. Tripathi, retired head of the Sanskrit collage of Banaras Hindu University I cannot but acknowledge that the many lectures I have heard him deliver and dialogues I have had with him over the years inspired and helped me very much to understand Pratyabhija, Bhartrhari's philosophy of grammar, Abhinavagupta's aesthetics and the Saiva Agamas. In a similar way, I had the good fortune to listen to many lectures and attend classes by the late Premalata Sharma, formerly Dean of the music faculty of BHU and president of the Sangit Nataka Academy. There are many other renowned scholars in Kasi whom also thank for inspiration such as Prof. Ananda Krishna and the late Vatukanatha Khiste, direct in line of Bhaskara Raya, the scholar and Srividya devotee. A special thanks also to Bettina Baumer whose dedication and scholarship in many fields has been an abiding source of inspiration for me throughout the 35 years of our acquaintance. Of those who do not reside in Benares I gratefully acknowledge Prof. Navajivan Rastogi whose works and lectures have helped me a great deal.

I should not forger to mention my good friends and fellow travellers, especially Dr. Shitalaprasad Upadhyaya, assistant in the Yogatantra Department at Sampurnananda Sanskrit University and Prof. Rana Singh of the Geography department of Banaras Hindu University. To the latter I am especially grateful for his instruction, direct and indirect, concerning the principles of sacred geography, particularly that of Kasi

I should also thank the people who have assisted me over the past 20 years, by typing manuscripts and collating them laboriously with meticulous care and processing my books and editions. First amongst them is Ravindra Mishra who has worked with me from the beginning and also Birendra Pathak, Vinay Kumar Mishra, Dharmendra Shrivastava and Devavrata Patel. I am most grateful to the staff of the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts who have been immensely supportive throughout the many years it took to complete this project. The most distinguished amongst them Kapila Vatsyayana who graciously accepted my project proposal many years back, Pt Satkari Mukhopadhyaya supervised and encouraged the work during the first years and subsequently Prof. G.C. Tripathi who has been patient and helpful in every way. I am most grateful the present Member Secretary, Prof. K.K. Cakravarti for having taken care to see the work go to the press as soon as possible and support me in every way through the process of publication. Nor can I forget to thank Dr. Shukla and Dr. Sharma who have been patiently encouraged and assisted me over the years to brings this work ti a fruitful conclusion.

I always recall with gratitude my fellow foreigners. My esteemed seniors and mentors include Professor Andre Padoux who especially in these last few years, has given me great moral support by his appreciation of my humble efforts professor Richard Gombrich has never forgotten me although many years have passed since he was my supervisor in Oxford. Others include the late David Kinsley, a sincere and most humble man who took pleasure in conversation and exchanging views. David Lorenzen has been a friend for over twenty-five years whom I have come to know better over the past ten or so since he began to make short yearly trips to Varanasi. He has always brought with him new vistas and interests along with his deep sensitivity and a self-effacing nature that hides the depth of his scholarship. Amongst my peers I would like to thank first of all the other David that is David white, who is indeed a sincere and true scholar. A dear friend, he has been unfailing in his support and has always tried his best to keep me on the path towards the distant goal of completing these volumes. A third David is David Lawrence who, aflame with the philosophy of the Pratyabhijna, has always lit my fire with his enthusiasm and insights. Amongst those younger then me, I recall Jeffrey Lidke, whose exchanges have led to much reflection, and John Nemec, who is doing well and has much to offer. I should mention with gratitude my students who, unknown to them have been supportive in their own way. Amongst them I would especially like to thank Alexandra Wenta for assisting me in checking references and Micheal Ianuzielo and Kashmiri Stec for reading the proofs.

I reserve a special place in these acknowledgments for my revered teacher Prof. Sanderson of the Sanskrit Department of the Oriental Institute at the University of Oxford with whom I was fortunate to study for my doctoral dissertation on the Spanda teachings of Kashmiri Saivism between 1975 and 1979. It was he who sowed the seeds of this work back in 1981 when he presented me as a wedding present copy of manuscripts of two texts. One was the Tantrasadbhava and the other the Kubjikamata. The study of Kashmiri Saivism under Prof. Sanderson's guidance opened a door for me onto the vast and rich world of the early Saivagamas which fascinated and attracted me intensely. Seeing my interest Prof. Sanderson's suggested that I should apply myself to the study of the Kubjika Tantras as a way into the Saivagamas and the Kaula Tantras. Were it not for him and my esteemed Indian teachers, I would not have given the best years of my life to this work.

I should also mention Muktabodha for whom I have been working for the past three years as academic advisor and director of the Varanasi office where e-texts of Sanskrit Tantric sources are produced for the on-line Mukatbodha digital library. Hema Patankar, Robert and Vasistha who are part of the executive staff of Muktabodha have always sustained me with their sincere appreciation of my humble attempts to contribute to the preservation and deeper understanding of Saivism. The digital library has also provided me with a location to put up my editions and collations of unpublished texts from which this book drawn. The interested reader is encouraged to visit the site occasionally and download them and other e-texts that are regularly added to the collection.

My personal site is markdkashi.com. There, those who are interested can download and hear my lectures and download of my essays. On this site or that of Muktabodha the reader will find the complete texts of the unpublished sources I quote in this work.

Finally, I am most grateful to Susheel Mittal and his staff at DK Printworld for the effort and care the put into printing the volumes of this book.

 

Contents of the Introduction

 

Introduction: Volume One

 

   
Acknowledgements XXVII-XXX
Abbreviations XXXI-XXV
Chapter One: The Myth of the Goddess  
The origin of the Goddess Kubjika 4
The Mountain and Island of the Moon 16
The Goddess emerges out of the Linga 38
Bhairava marries the Goddess 64
The Burning of Kamadeva 67
The wedding ceremony 68
The Union of the God and the Goddess 70
The Goddess's Pilgrimage 71
Mount Kaumara -Srisaila 73
Trikuta 75

Manthanabhairavatantram Kumarikakhandah (The Section Concerning the Virgin Goddess of the Tantra of the Churning Bhairava In Fourteen Volumes)

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From the Jacket

The Manthanabhairavatantra is about 24,000 verses long and is divided into three section (Khanda). The one edited and translated here is the Kumarikakhanda. Along with the Kubjikamata, the Manthanabhairavatantra is the most important and extensive Tantra dedicated to the worship of the goddess Kubjika. Although originally an Indian goddess, Kubjika is almost exclusively worshiped in the Kathmandu valley, where her cult has been kept scrupulously secret by Newar initiates for centuries. Almost all the manuscripts of her Tantras and related literature have been found there.

Kubjika is a powerful development of Malini, the principal goddess of the Trika Tantras and Kali of the Kashmiri Krama tradition. Her cult belongs to a chain of early Kaula systems that culminate with that of the goddess Tripura and so sheds considerable light on them. Kubjika's unique historical importance is mirrored in the extraordinary richness of the inner, spiritual dimensions of her cult. These are explored in detail in the introduction the edition and translation of the text with extensive references from mostly unpublished Kubjika Tantras and those of related schools.

The work took close to two decades to produce. In this time numerous working editions of unpublished Tantras and related texts were prepared by the author with the help of a team of five trained assistants.

 

About the Author

Mark Dyczkowski was born in London in 1951. After completing his schooling in 1969 he went to India for his spiritual development and to study Sanskrit, Indian philosophy and music. After receiving his first degrees from Banaras Hindu University in 1975, he returned to England for his doctoral research at the University of Oxford in Kashmiri Saiviam. He is well known for his publication in this field. Since 1979 he has continued to work and live in India. He was been associated with the IGNCA Since 1993. At present he supervises and contributes to the input of an on-line digital library of Tantric texts for Muktabodha Ideological Research Institute. The site muktabodha. Com. Recordings of his lectures on Kashmiri Saivism and some of his publication can be downloaded from his site markdkshi.com.

 

Acknowledgements

Reflecting on over 35 year of study during most of which I have had the great good fortune to live in India, the Holy Land of the Rsis, Siddhas and Yoginis, I cannot escape the feeling that a mighty Divine power has guided my life. Any acknowledgment of help received or inspiration must begin for me with a sense of profound gratitude to the one infinite Being who sustains and is both the origin and final and of all things. Nowadays, in this modern secular world such declarations seem improper and contrary to the spirit of detached objectivity the serious academic research demands. Nonetheless, bound as a scholar by the moral duty it acknowledges my sources and those who have assisted me and taught me, I cannot do otherwise. Where it not for that impulse, inscrutable as it is powerful that sent me from England, my native land, to india in 1968 and to the many people I was fortunate to meet there who taught and guided me, the volumes the reader has before him would not exist.

Amongst the many come to mind I can only mention a few, the first of whom is the late Pt. Ambikadatta Upadhyaya at whose feet I was introduced to the Sanskrit language and the marvels of the world of Sanskrit literature. Pt. Hemendranatha Cakravarti, renowned disciple of the great Mahamahopadhyaya Gopinath Kaviraj, opened the door the allowed me to enter the glorious realms of Kashmiri Saivism. Subsequently, the revered Kashmiri master, swami Laksmanjoo sealed my quest with his initiation and divinely inspired teachings. Words cannot express the good fortune of a person who was has had the chance to sit at the feet of a fully realised soul and study from him. While Swamiji was a great master in inner practice in Nepal I was introduced into the vast and complex the purohitas and Tantric gurus of the Malla kings of Bhaktapur. Kedararaja generously gave me his time and courageously braved the possible consequences of transmitting such matters outside the circle of his initiates.

Pt. Vrajavallabha Dvivedi, former head of the Yogatantra Department at Sampurnaanda Sankrit University, has been an abiding source of inexhaustible knowledge. Indeed his work is formidable ranging as it does through virtually every major Tantric tradition including not only Kashmiri Saivism, but also Saiva Siddhhanta, Vira Saivism, Srividya and the Kaula Tantrism.

In other areas of study I cannot but recall with gratitude Pt. B.P. Tripathi, better known as Vagisa Sastri, former Director of the Research Department Sampurnananda Sanskrit University, who laboured for years to each me Sanskrit grammar both in the traditional manner and through his own didactic method.

Although I have not studied formally with Prof. K.D. Tripathi, retired head of the Sanskrit collage of Banaras Hindu University I cannot but acknowledge that the many lectures I have heard him deliver and dialogues I have had with him over the years inspired and helped me very much to understand Pratyabhija, Bhartrhari's philosophy of grammar, Abhinavagupta's aesthetics and the Saiva Agamas. In a similar way, I had the good fortune to listen to many lectures and attend classes by the late Premalata Sharma, formerly Dean of the music faculty of BHU and president of the Sangit Nataka Academy. There are many other renowned scholars in Kasi whom also thank for inspiration such as Prof. Ananda Krishna and the late Vatukanatha Khiste, direct in line of Bhaskara Raya, the scholar and Srividya devotee. A special thanks also to Bettina Baumer whose dedication and scholarship in many fields has been an abiding source of inspiration for me throughout the 35 years of our acquaintance. Of those who do not reside in Benares I gratefully acknowledge Prof. Navajivan Rastogi whose works and lectures have helped me a great deal.

I should not forger to mention my good friends and fellow travellers, especially Dr. Shitalaprasad Upadhyaya, assistant in the Yogatantra Department at Sampurnananda Sanskrit University and Prof. Rana Singh of the Geography department of Banaras Hindu University. To the latter I am especially grateful for his instruction, direct and indirect, concerning the principles of sacred geography, particularly that of Kasi

I should also thank the people who have assisted me over the past 20 years, by typing manuscripts and collating them laboriously with meticulous care and processing my books and editions. First amongst them is Ravindra Mishra who has worked with me from the beginning and also Birendra Pathak, Vinay Kumar Mishra, Dharmendra Shrivastava and Devavrata Patel. I am most grateful to the staff of the Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts who have been immensely supportive throughout the many years it took to complete this project. The most distinguished amongst them Kapila Vatsyayana who graciously accepted my project proposal many years back, Pt Satkari Mukhopadhyaya supervised and encouraged the work during the first years and subsequently Prof. G.C. Tripathi who has been patient and helpful in every way. I am most grateful the present Member Secretary, Prof. K.K. Cakravarti for having taken care to see the work go to the press as soon as possible and support me in every way through the process of publication. Nor can I forget to thank Dr. Shukla and Dr. Sharma who have been patiently encouraged and assisted me over the years to brings this work ti a fruitful conclusion.

I always recall with gratitude my fellow foreigners. My esteemed seniors and mentors include Professor Andre Padoux who especially in these last few years, has given me great moral support by his appreciation of my humble efforts professor Richard Gombrich has never forgotten me although many years have passed since he was my supervisor in Oxford. Others include the late David Kinsley, a sincere and most humble man who took pleasure in conversation and exchanging views. David Lorenzen has been a friend for over twenty-five years whom I have come to know better over the past ten or so since he began to make short yearly trips to Varanasi. He has always brought with him new vistas and interests along with his deep sensitivity and a self-effacing nature that hides the depth of his scholarship. Amongst my peers I would like to thank first of all the other David that is David white, who is indeed a sincere and true scholar. A dear friend, he has been unfailing in his support and has always tried his best to keep me on the path towards the distant goal of completing these volumes. A third David is David Lawrence who, aflame with the philosophy of the Pratyabhijna, has always lit my fire with his enthusiasm and insights. Amongst those younger then me, I recall Jeffrey Lidke, whose exchanges have led to much reflection, and John Nemec, who is doing well and has much to offer. I should mention with gratitude my students who, unknown to them have been supportive in their own way. Amongst them I would especially like to thank Alexandra Wenta for assisting me in checking references and Micheal Ianuzielo and Kashmiri Stec for reading the proofs.

I reserve a special place in these acknowledgments for my revered teacher Prof. Sanderson of the Sanskrit Department of the Oriental Institute at the University of Oxford with whom I was fortunate to study for my doctoral dissertation on the Spanda teachings of Kashmiri Saivism between 1975 and 1979. It was he who sowed the seeds of this work back in 1981 when he presented me as a wedding present copy of manuscripts of two texts. One was the Tantrasadbhava and the other the Kubjikamata. The study of Kashmiri Saivism under Prof. Sanderson's guidance opened a door for me onto the vast and rich world of the early Saivagamas which fascinated and attracted me intensely. Seeing my interest Prof. Sanderson's suggested that I should apply myself to the study of the Kubjika Tantras as a way into the Saivagamas and the Kaula Tantras. Were it not for him and my esteemed Indian teachers, I would not have given the best years of my life to this work.

I should also mention Muktabodha for whom I have been working for the past three years as academic advisor and director of the Varanasi office where e-texts of Sanskrit Tantric sources are produced for the on-line Mukatbodha digital library. Hema Patankar, Robert and Vasistha who are part of the executive staff of Muktabodha have always sustained me with their sincere appreciation of my humble attempts to contribute to the preservation and deeper understanding of Saivism. The digital library has also provided me with a location to put up my editions and collations of unpublished texts from which this book drawn. The interested reader is encouraged to visit the site occasionally and download them and other e-texts that are regularly added to the collection.

My personal site is markdkashi.com. There, those who are interested can download and hear my lectures and download of my essays. On this site or that of Muktabodha the reader will find the complete texts of the unpublished sources I quote in this work.

Finally, I am most grateful to Susheel Mittal and his staff at DK Printworld for the effort and care the put into printing the volumes of this book.

 

Contents of the Introduction

 

Introduction: Volume One

 

   
Acknowledgements XXVII-XXX
Abbreviations XXXI-XXV
Chapter One: The Myth of the Goddess  
The origin of the Goddess Kubjika 4
The Mountain and Island of the Moon 16
The Goddess emerges out of the Linga 38
Bhairava marries the Goddess 64
The Burning of Kamadeva 67
The wedding ceremony 68
The Union of the God and the Goddess 70
The Goddess's Pilgrimage 71
Mount Kaumara -Srisaila 73
Trikuta 75
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