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Books > Philosophy > The Nyaya-Sutras Of Gautama: With The Bhasya Of Vatsyayana And The Vartika Of Uddyotakara ( Set of 4 Volumes)
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The Nyaya-Sutras Of Gautama: With The Bhasya Of Vatsyayana And The Vartika Of Uddyotakara ( Set of 4 Volumes)
The Nyaya-Sutras Of Gautama: With The Bhasya Of Vatsyayana And The Vartika Of Uddyotakara ( Set of 4 Volumes)
Description

From the Jacket:

This is reprint of the English Translation of the Nyaya Sutras of Gautama by Mm. Dr. Ganganatha Jha, the versatile Sanskrit scholar who will ever be remembered for his dedicated and selfless pioneer work and immense contribution in the field.

The work was first published serially in the Indian Thought (Vols. IV-XI), a quarterly journal devoted to Sanskrit learning, over a period of eight years from 1912 to 1919.

Dr. Jha's translation cover a large field and includes, besides the original Sutras of Gautama, the Bhasya of Vatsyayana and the Vartika of Uddyotakara in full as well as relevant notes from Vacaspati Misra's Nyayavartika-tatparyatika, Udayana's tatparyaparisuddhi and Raghutama's Bhasyacandra. The work naturally became enormous in bulk and it is not surprising that it took for its completion so many years and so much energy of the author and as many as 1800 pages in print.

This reprint of the great work is issued in response to the increasing demand of scholars.

 

PUBLISHERS NOTE

This is a reprint of the English Translation of the Nyaya Sutra; of Gautama by Mm. Dr. Ganganatha Jha, the versatile Sanskrit scholar who will ever be remembered for his dedicated and selfless pioneer work and immense contribution in the field.

The work was first published serially in the Indian Thought (Vols. IV-XI), a quarterly journal devoted to Sanskrit learning, over a period of eight years from 1912 to 1919.

Dr. Jha’s translation covers a large field and includes, besides the original Sutras of Gautama, the Bhasya of Vatsyayana and the Vartika of Uddyotakara in full as well as relevant notes from Vacaspatimisra’s Nyayavartika•tatparyatika, Udayana’s Tatparyaparisuddhi and Raghuttama’s Bhasyacandra. The work naturally became enormous in bulk and it is not surprising that it took for its completion so many years and so much energy of the author and as many as 1,800 pages in print. Perhaps this also explains why in spite of the great utility and importance of the work no publisher could venture to bring it out in a book form during the past so many decades.

We are offering with great pleasure to the interested readers this reprint of the great work in response to the increasing demand of the scholars and believe that it will be received in a befitting manner.

 

Preface

Not being learned in the ‘Science' or ‘Art` of ‘ Chronology,’ I have secured a contribution on that subject from my colleague, Pandit Gopinatha Kaviraj, which is printed here as the ‘ Introduction’ ; and I am thankful to him for having thus removed a serious defect from the present work. It remains for me only to indicate in brief the materials that I have made use of in preparing this translation. For the Bhasya I have relied mainly upon the Edition published in the ‘ Vizianagram Sanskrit Series ’ and for the Vartika on the Edition in the ‘ Bibliotheca Indica ’; for the latter I was also helped, after having finished Adhyaya I, by the Second Edition (or rather ‘ reprint ’) of the work in the Benares Series. In the case of the former I was helped by the following manuscripts :—

I. Palm-leaf styled in the notes as ‘Puri Ms. B’ which contains the Bhasya from 1-2-4 to the end.
II. Palm-leaf styled as ‘Puri Ms. A,’ containing the Bhasya from the beginning to 3-2-42.
III. A palm-leaf Ms. of the Sutra only. These three were kindly lent to me by the revered Shankaracharya of Govardhanamatha, Puri.
IV. A palm-leaf Ms. of the Bhasya, Adhyuya V only- styled ‘C.’
V. A palm-leaf Ms. of the Bhasya, Adhyaya V only- styled ‘D.’
VI. Paper Ms. of the Sutra only belonging to Jagadish Mishra.
VII. Paper Ms. of Sutra only belonging to Babu Govinda- dasa.

Every one of these manuscripts was found to be quite correct, specially the first two, which proved of incalculable help in fixing the text of the Bhasya in several places.

For the Tatparya I have used the edition in the ‘Vizianagram Sanskrit Series.’

For the Parishuadhi, I have had to rely upon a manuscript secured for me several years ago from Madras, by my friend Babu Govindadasa.

Of the Bhasyachandra, I had a single manuscript, obtained from Babu Grovindadasa’s valuable collection. In addition to these I have also used, for my notes, (a) the Bodhasiddhi also called Nyayanarishista of Udayana, and the Anviksanayatattvabodha of Vardhamana;-manuscripts of both of them having been secured for me by Mahamahopadhyaya P. Vindhyeshwari Prasad Dube of the Sanskrit College Library.

The translation of Vatsyayana was taken up in sheer "bravado," if the use of such a term be permissible in this connection. The first scholar to try his hands on it was the late Dr. Ballantyne, who handed down the task to his pupil Mahamahopadhyaya P. Keshavashastri, who carried on the work up to a few pages and then apparently gave it up. Subsequently the work was taken up by a friend of mine at Calcutta; but when I asked him, after a few years, how far he had progressed, he told me frankly that the work was terribly difficult and so he had given it up. Then and there I made up my mind to undertake the work,-and to make the task still more difficult, and hence worth doing-I took up the Vartika also.

How far I have succeeded in this audacious task, it is for the learned to judge, and in their hands I leave it, de- siring no better tribunal to adjudicate upon my work and upon my reputation.

 

Introduction

The Works, of which an English translation has been offered for the first time in the following pages, consist of (a) Nyaya-sutras by Gotama, (b) Nyaya-bhasya by Vatsyayana and (c) Nyaya Vartika by Uddyotakara. Vachaspati Misra’s Tatparyatika, Udayana’s Tatparyaparisuddhi and Raghut- tama’s Bhashyachandra, have been utilised only in so far as they have been deemed useful for illuminating the more obscure points in the Sutras or in their Commentaries.

The history of Nyaya remains still to be written, and it is not known with certainty how and when this system came to be associated with Vaishesika. In the Ny5.ya• bhasya, and naturally in all subsequent works based upon it, we find the two systems generally mixed up. The Vaishesika categories are everywhere tacitly assumed in Nyaya, and, though on certain points, metaphysical (e.g. ’ pilupaka ’ versus ‘pitharapaka’) and epistemological (e. g. recognition of the number of pramanas, viz. four in Nyaya and two in Vaiséshika), the two schools diverge from each other, their general harmony is still very remarkable and would seem to be fundamental. In the present state of our knowledge it is not possible to discriminate the two systems with any degree of accuracy, except by characterising one as mainly logical and methodological and the other as metaphysical. And besides this there are other factors to be counted.

There have been theological influences at work in the elaboration of the ideas of each school. The allied Jain and on the system as a whole. The age in which the early Nyaya literature was written was an age of polemics, and until the history of contemporary thought, especially what is revealed in the oldest Buddhist and Jain literature, comes to be written, all speculations regarding the fundamental character of this literature are bound to him more or less unsuccessful. Then again, there is the almost insurmountable difficulty of determining, in the case of the Sutras and the Bhasya, whether the whole work proceeded from one author or consists of parts ascribable to different authors belonging to different times. The subject is complicated, and a study of the Bhasya and of the Vartika is calculated to be very helpful in this direction.

 

CONTENTS
VOLUME I

 

Publisher's Note v
Preface ix
Introduction xi
Enunciation of Subjects, Purpose and Connection of the Treatise 1
Importance of the Shastra 79
Defintion of Pramanas 97
        Perception 111
        Inferential Cognition 153
        Analogy 196
        Word 200
The Objects of Cognition 210
        Soul 216
        Body 233
        The Sense-Organs 238
        The Material Substances 243
        Apprehension (Buddhi) 265
        Mind (Manas) 268
        Activity (Pravritti) 275
        Defect (Dosa) 276
        Rebirth (Pretyabhava) 279
        Fruition (Phala) 280
        Pain (Duhkha) 282
        Final Release (Apavarga) 284
Preliminaries of Reasoning 299
        Doubt (Samshaya) 299
        Motive (Prayojana) 339
        Example (Dristanta) 341
The Basis of Reasoning :
        Doctrine (Siddhanta)
343
Reasoning 355
        The Statement of the Proposition 360
        The Statement of the Probans 383
        The Statement of the Example 424
        The Statement of the Reaffirmation 436
        The Final Conclusion 438
Factors Supplementary of Reasoning  
        Hypothetical Reasoning (Tarka) 445
        Definitive Cognition (Nirnaya) 458
        Controversy 471
        Disputation 514
        Wrangling 521
Fallacies 523
        The Inconclusive Probans 539
        The Contradictory Probans 546
        The Neutralized Probans 552
        The Unknown Probans 556
        The Belated or Mistimed Probans 560
Casuistry 566
VOLUME II

 

Detailed Examination of Doubt 585
Detailed Examination of Pramanas in General 606
Detailed Examination of Perception 661
Examination of the Nature of Composite Wholes 707
Examination of Inference 798
Examination of the Nature of Time - specially the Present 805
Examination of Analogical Cognition 816
Examination of Word in General 825
On 'Word' in Particular 847
The Exact Number of Pramanas 881
Non-eternality of Words 903
Modifications of Sound 987
Examination of the Nature of Words and their Potencies 1009

 

VOLUME THREE

 

The Soul is something distinct from the sense-organs 1067
The Soul is distinct from the Body 1104
The Soul is different from the Mind 1146
The Soul is Eternal 1152
The Exact Nature of the Body 1172
The Sense-organs and their Material Character 1180
The Sense-organs: One or Many 1218
Examination of Objects of Sense-organs 1244
Transient Character of Buddhi (cognition) 1265
Examination of the Theory that Things of the World are Undergoing Destruction Every Moment 1293
Buddhi is a Quality of the Soul 1329
Buddhi is not a Quality of the Body 1383
The Mind 1395
The Body is formed under the influence of the Unseen Force 1400

 

VOLUME FOUR

 

General Examination of Activity and Defect 1429
Defects divided into three Groups 1432
Examination of Rebirth 1443
Examination of the Theory that Things of the World are produced out of the Void 1449
Examination of the Theory that God is the Cause of the Universe 1456
Examination of the View that the World is the Result of Chance 1481
Examination of the View that all Things are Evanescent 1486
Examination of the Theory that all Things are Eternal 1492
The Refutation of the view that all is Diversity, there is no Unity 1504
The Refutation of the Theory that all is mere Void 1511
Examination of certain Sweeping Assertions in regard to the exact number of things 1523
On Fruition 1528
Examination of the Nature of Pain 1548
Examination of the Nature of Final Release 1555
Appearance of True Knowledge 1577
Components and Composites 1586
Atom being without parts 1608
Refutation of the Denial of the External World 1628
The Development of True Knowledge 1647
The Defending of True Knowledge 1657
The Futile Rejoinders 1659
        Parity per Similarity and Parity Per Dissimilarity 1665
        Parity per Argumentation, Parity Per Subtraction, Parity per Uncertainty, Parity per Certainty,
        Parity per Shuffling and Parity per Probandum
1672
        Parity per Convergence, Parity per Non-convergence 1681
        Sarity per Continued Question, and Parity per Counter-instance 1685
        Parity per Non-generation 1691
        Parity per Doubt 1695
        Parity per Neutralization 1697
        Parity per Non-probativeness 1700
        Parity per Presumption 1703
        Parity per Non-difference 1705
        Parity per Evidence 1708
        Parity per Apprehension 1710
        Parity per Non-apprehension 1713
        Parity per Non-eternality 1718
        Parity per Eternality 1722
        Parity per Character of Effect 1726
The Six Steps of a Futile Discussion 1729
Clinchers or Grounds of Defeat 1736

 


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The Nyaya-Sutras Of Gautama: With The Bhasya Of Vatsyayana And The Vartika Of Uddyotakara ( Set of 4 Volumes)

Item Code:
IDE735
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
1999
ISBN:
8120812646
Language:
English
Size:
8.8" X 5.7"
Pages:
1800
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Weight of the Book: 2.200 kg
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$225.00
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From the Jacket:

This is reprint of the English Translation of the Nyaya Sutras of Gautama by Mm. Dr. Ganganatha Jha, the versatile Sanskrit scholar who will ever be remembered for his dedicated and selfless pioneer work and immense contribution in the field.

The work was first published serially in the Indian Thought (Vols. IV-XI), a quarterly journal devoted to Sanskrit learning, over a period of eight years from 1912 to 1919.

Dr. Jha's translation cover a large field and includes, besides the original Sutras of Gautama, the Bhasya of Vatsyayana and the Vartika of Uddyotakara in full as well as relevant notes from Vacaspati Misra's Nyayavartika-tatparyatika, Udayana's tatparyaparisuddhi and Raghutama's Bhasyacandra. The work naturally became enormous in bulk and it is not surprising that it took for its completion so many years and so much energy of the author and as many as 1800 pages in print.

This reprint of the great work is issued in response to the increasing demand of scholars.

 

PUBLISHERS NOTE

This is a reprint of the English Translation of the Nyaya Sutra; of Gautama by Mm. Dr. Ganganatha Jha, the versatile Sanskrit scholar who will ever be remembered for his dedicated and selfless pioneer work and immense contribution in the field.

The work was first published serially in the Indian Thought (Vols. IV-XI), a quarterly journal devoted to Sanskrit learning, over a period of eight years from 1912 to 1919.

Dr. Jha’s translation covers a large field and includes, besides the original Sutras of Gautama, the Bhasya of Vatsyayana and the Vartika of Uddyotakara in full as well as relevant notes from Vacaspatimisra’s Nyayavartika•tatparyatika, Udayana’s Tatparyaparisuddhi and Raghuttama’s Bhasyacandra. The work naturally became enormous in bulk and it is not surprising that it took for its completion so many years and so much energy of the author and as many as 1,800 pages in print. Perhaps this also explains why in spite of the great utility and importance of the work no publisher could venture to bring it out in a book form during the past so many decades.

We are offering with great pleasure to the interested readers this reprint of the great work in response to the increasing demand of the scholars and believe that it will be received in a befitting manner.

 

Preface

Not being learned in the ‘Science' or ‘Art` of ‘ Chronology,’ I have secured a contribution on that subject from my colleague, Pandit Gopinatha Kaviraj, which is printed here as the ‘ Introduction’ ; and I am thankful to him for having thus removed a serious defect from the present work. It remains for me only to indicate in brief the materials that I have made use of in preparing this translation. For the Bhasya I have relied mainly upon the Edition published in the ‘ Vizianagram Sanskrit Series ’ and for the Vartika on the Edition in the ‘ Bibliotheca Indica ’; for the latter I was also helped, after having finished Adhyaya I, by the Second Edition (or rather ‘ reprint ’) of the work in the Benares Series. In the case of the former I was helped by the following manuscripts :—

I. Palm-leaf styled in the notes as ‘Puri Ms. B’ which contains the Bhasya from 1-2-4 to the end.
II. Palm-leaf styled as ‘Puri Ms. A,’ containing the Bhasya from the beginning to 3-2-42.
III. A palm-leaf Ms. of the Sutra only. These three were kindly lent to me by the revered Shankaracharya of Govardhanamatha, Puri.
IV. A palm-leaf Ms. of the Bhasya, Adhyuya V only- styled ‘C.’
V. A palm-leaf Ms. of the Bhasya, Adhyaya V only- styled ‘D.’
VI. Paper Ms. of the Sutra only belonging to Jagadish Mishra.
VII. Paper Ms. of Sutra only belonging to Babu Govinda- dasa.

Every one of these manuscripts was found to be quite correct, specially the first two, which proved of incalculable help in fixing the text of the Bhasya in several places.

For the Tatparya I have used the edition in the ‘Vizianagram Sanskrit Series.’

For the Parishuadhi, I have had to rely upon a manuscript secured for me several years ago from Madras, by my friend Babu Govindadasa.

Of the Bhasyachandra, I had a single manuscript, obtained from Babu Grovindadasa’s valuable collection. In addition to these I have also used, for my notes, (a) the Bodhasiddhi also called Nyayanarishista of Udayana, and the Anviksanayatattvabodha of Vardhamana;-manuscripts of both of them having been secured for me by Mahamahopadhyaya P. Vindhyeshwari Prasad Dube of the Sanskrit College Library.

The translation of Vatsyayana was taken up in sheer "bravado," if the use of such a term be permissible in this connection. The first scholar to try his hands on it was the late Dr. Ballantyne, who handed down the task to his pupil Mahamahopadhyaya P. Keshavashastri, who carried on the work up to a few pages and then apparently gave it up. Subsequently the work was taken up by a friend of mine at Calcutta; but when I asked him, after a few years, how far he had progressed, he told me frankly that the work was terribly difficult and so he had given it up. Then and there I made up my mind to undertake the work,-and to make the task still more difficult, and hence worth doing-I took up the Vartika also.

How far I have succeeded in this audacious task, it is for the learned to judge, and in their hands I leave it, de- siring no better tribunal to adjudicate upon my work and upon my reputation.

 

Introduction

The Works, of which an English translation has been offered for the first time in the following pages, consist of (a) Nyaya-sutras by Gotama, (b) Nyaya-bhasya by Vatsyayana and (c) Nyaya Vartika by Uddyotakara. Vachaspati Misra’s Tatparyatika, Udayana’s Tatparyaparisuddhi and Raghut- tama’s Bhashyachandra, have been utilised only in so far as they have been deemed useful for illuminating the more obscure points in the Sutras or in their Commentaries.

The history of Nyaya remains still to be written, and it is not known with certainty how and when this system came to be associated with Vaishesika. In the Ny5.ya• bhasya, and naturally in all subsequent works based upon it, we find the two systems generally mixed up. The Vaishesika categories are everywhere tacitly assumed in Nyaya, and, though on certain points, metaphysical (e.g. ’ pilupaka ’ versus ‘pitharapaka’) and epistemological (e. g. recognition of the number of pramanas, viz. four in Nyaya and two in Vaiséshika), the two schools diverge from each other, their general harmony is still very remarkable and would seem to be fundamental. In the present state of our knowledge it is not possible to discriminate the two systems with any degree of accuracy, except by characterising one as mainly logical and methodological and the other as metaphysical. And besides this there are other factors to be counted.

There have been theological influences at work in the elaboration of the ideas of each school. The allied Jain and on the system as a whole. The age in which the early Nyaya literature was written was an age of polemics, and until the history of contemporary thought, especially what is revealed in the oldest Buddhist and Jain literature, comes to be written, all speculations regarding the fundamental character of this literature are bound to him more or less unsuccessful. Then again, there is the almost insurmountable difficulty of determining, in the case of the Sutras and the Bhasya, whether the whole work proceeded from one author or consists of parts ascribable to different authors belonging to different times. The subject is complicated, and a study of the Bhasya and of the Vartika is calculated to be very helpful in this direction.

 

CONTENTS
VOLUME I

 

Publisher's Note v
Preface ix
Introduction xi
Enunciation of Subjects, Purpose and Connection of the Treatise 1
Importance of the Shastra 79
Defintion of Pramanas 97
        Perception 111
        Inferential Cognition 153
        Analogy 196
        Word 200
The Objects of Cognition 210
        Soul 216
        Body 233
        The Sense-Organs 238
        The Material Substances 243
        Apprehension (Buddhi) 265
        Mind (Manas) 268
        Activity (Pravritti) 275
        Defect (Dosa) 276
        Rebirth (Pretyabhava) 279
        Fruition (Phala) 280
        Pain (Duhkha) 282
        Final Release (Apavarga) 284
Preliminaries of Reasoning 299
        Doubt (Samshaya) 299
        Motive (Prayojana) 339
        Example (Dristanta) 341
The Basis of Reasoning :
        Doctrine (Siddhanta)
343
Reasoning 355
        The Statement of the Proposition 360
        The Statement of the Probans 383
        The Statement of the Example 424
        The Statement of the Reaffirmation 436
        The Final Conclusion 438
Factors Supplementary of Reasoning  
        Hypothetical Reasoning (Tarka) 445
        Definitive Cognition (Nirnaya) 458
        Controversy 471
        Disputation 514
        Wrangling 521
Fallacies 523
        The Inconclusive Probans 539
        The Contradictory Probans 546
        The Neutralized Probans 552
        The Unknown Probans 556
        The Belated or Mistimed Probans 560
Casuistry 566
VOLUME II

 

Detailed Examination of Doubt 585
Detailed Examination of Pramanas in General 606
Detailed Examination of Perception 661
Examination of the Nature of Composite Wholes 707
Examination of Inference 798
Examination of the Nature of Time - specially the Present 805
Examination of Analogical Cognition 816
Examination of Word in General 825
On 'Word' in Particular 847
The Exact Number of Pramanas 881
Non-eternality of Words 903
Modifications of Sound 987
Examination of the Nature of Words and their Potencies 1009

 

VOLUME THREE

 

The Soul is something distinct from the sense-organs 1067
The Soul is distinct from the Body 1104
The Soul is different from the Mind 1146
The Soul is Eternal 1152
The Exact Nature of the Body 1172
The Sense-organs and their Material Character 1180
The Sense-organs: One or Many 1218
Examination of Objects of Sense-organs 1244
Transient Character of Buddhi (cognition) 1265
Examination of the Theory that Things of the World are Undergoing Destruction Every Moment 1293
Buddhi is a Quality of the Soul 1329
Buddhi is not a Quality of the Body 1383
The Mind 1395
The Body is formed under the influence of the Unseen Force 1400

 

VOLUME FOUR

 

General Examination of Activity and Defect 1429
Defects divided into three Groups 1432
Examination of Rebirth 1443
Examination of the Theory that Things of the World are produced out of the Void 1449
Examination of the Theory that God is the Cause of the Universe 1456
Examination of the View that the World is the Result of Chance 1481
Examination of the View that all Things are Evanescent 1486
Examination of the Theory that all Things are Eternal 1492
The Refutation of the view that all is Diversity, there is no Unity 1504
The Refutation of the Theory that all is mere Void 1511
Examination of certain Sweeping Assertions in regard to the exact number of things 1523
On Fruition 1528
Examination of the Nature of Pain 1548
Examination of the Nature of Final Release 1555
Appearance of True Knowledge 1577
Components and Composites 1586
Atom being without parts 1608
Refutation of the Denial of the External World 1628
The Development of True Knowledge 1647
The Defending of True Knowledge 1657
The Futile Rejoinders 1659
        Parity per Similarity and Parity Per Dissimilarity 1665
        Parity per Argumentation, Parity Per Subtraction, Parity per Uncertainty, Parity per Certainty,
        Parity per Shuffling and Parity per Probandum
1672
        Parity per Convergence, Parity per Non-convergence 1681
        Sarity per Continued Question, and Parity per Counter-instance 1685
        Parity per Non-generation 1691
        Parity per Doubt 1695
        Parity per Neutralization 1697
        Parity per Non-probativeness 1700
        Parity per Presumption 1703
        Parity per Non-difference 1705
        Parity per Evidence 1708
        Parity per Apprehension 1710
        Parity per Non-apprehension 1713
        Parity per Non-eternality 1718
        Parity per Eternality 1722
        Parity per Character of Effect 1726
The Six Steps of a Futile Discussion 1729
Clinchers or Grounds of Defeat 1736

 


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Item Code: IDF191
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Manikana (A Navya-Nyaya Manual)
Item Code: IDH336
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न्यायसुधा: Nyaya Sudha (Set of 12 Volumes)
Item Code: NZG246
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Inference and Fallacies Discussed in Ancient Indian Logic (With Special Reference to Nyaya and Buddhism)
by Pradeep P. Gokhale
Hardcover (Edition: 1992)
Sri Satguru Publications
Item Code: NAC243
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