Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
Share
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Books > Performing Arts > Pramathesh Chandra Barua : The Crownless Prince The Eternal Devdas (The Legends of Indian Cinema)
Displaying 921 of 1247         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Pramathesh Chandra Barua : The Crownless Prince The Eternal Devdas (The Legends of Indian Cinema)
Pramathesh Chandra Barua : The Crownless Prince The Eternal Devdas (The Legends of Indian Cinema)
Description
About the book

Pramathesh Chandra Barua or P.C. Barua as he was known, was an enigma through his life. Born into a royal family, this prince-turned-actor-director changed the theatrical manner of stylised acting into the conversational manner of real-life situations. His rise as an actor- director was matched with tragic failures in his personal life. Strangely, the last stage of his life resembled that of the hero he made famous - Devdas. Alcohol became his nemesis, he was consumed by tuberculosis, and died an untimely death. This book traces the life and towering achievements of one of the legends of Indian cinema.

About the Author

Shoma A. Chatterji, journalist and author, won the National Award (1991) for best film critic and the Best Film Critic Award from the Bengal Film Journalists' Association (1998). She won a research fellowship from the National Film Archives, Pune in 2004-2005 and is currently Senior Research Fellow of PSBT (Public Service Broadcasting Trust), Delhi. She won the second prize from the Sahitya Akademi for its Golden Short Story Translation Contest in 2007. She has been a jury at several International Film Festivals. She has authored sixteen books on cinema, gender issues, short fiction and urban history. She has been writing for thirty years and her Parama and Other Outsiders - The Cinema of Aparna Sen. won the National Award for the best book on cinema in 2003.

Editor’s Note

The story of Pramathesh Barua has all the makings of a fairy tale - the prince who became an actor and a filmmaker - dashing, flamboyant, handsome, talented and rich, transforming the cinema of his time.

But he was a prince steeped in melancholy who looked for solace in the arms of women, who found relief in alcohol, then died of tuberculosis when he was just 48. But not before he had made an indelible mark on Indian cinema. He introduced a daringly new style of acting - low-key, restrained, understated - in films that have stood the test of time. It was he who first brought on to the screen the doomed hero of Saratchandra Chatterjee's Devdas, the figure who clearly echoed Barua's own introverted, melancholy character. Devdas, the film and the character, reverberated through the country in the decades that followed. The romantic lover whose tragic flaw is the inability to be decisive and who dies yearning for his lost love. If one can pick a single character that shaped not only Indian cinema but Indian youth through decades, it was Devdas. Barua directed both the Bengali and Hindi versions, playing the protagonist himself in Bengali before directing K. L. Saigal in the Hindi version that followed. Both versions made Devdas into a cult figure.

In Mukti he also created the doomed figure, prepared to sacrifice himself. In Zindagi, with K. L. Saigal, the lovers are again forced to part. Death was the ending of many of his films - death by choice, or death or separation imposed by a cruel, unfeeling fate. Perhaps he himself was always haunted by the thought of his premature mortality. These were only four of the many films that Barua created, from the silent era through the challenging years of the thirties when he was with the legendary New Theatres.

Barua not only personified the characters he portrayed in his films as writer, director and often actor but his impact on Indian cinema when it was evolving in the early years is far- reaching. His influence extended far beyond his time. Raj Kapoor, Guru Dutt, Bimal Roy (who was the cameraman of Barua's Devdas before making his own version 20 years later) were his fervent admirers.

Like many of the great innovators and stylists of an early era, today they are hardly remembered. This book is part of a series to recall them with a sense of pride and acknowledge their immense contribution to the history of Indian cinema.

Shoma A. Chatterji is among the few today who writes of the legendary figures of the past with dedication and passion. In this book she brings alive one of Indian cinema's most charismatic figures.

Introduction

Pramathesh Chandra Barua, a real-life prince, was born in the royal family of Gauripur, Assam, in October 1903. Some accounts mention the date as October 10 while others say it was October 24. Such biographical confusions dot Barua whose life-story offers stuff more exciting than the scripts of the films he made. But they do not disturb the essence of the story. Rather, they add to the intrigue and the mystique of a man who changed the face of Indian cinema for all time to come-with his choice of stories from classical Bengali literature, with his personalised style of natural acting, with his technical innovations, some of them being turning points in Indian cinematic technique and last but not the least, with Devdas, the eternal lover, who continues to haunt young and old alike, well into the 21st century.

"He was a living legend in Bengali cinema. He was the heart-throb of millions, the idol of my adolescence," wrote the late Mukul Roy, who had a brief association with Barua in 1939 when he worked as a child-actor in a Barua film. "He was not only a great director and actor, but was also a brilliant photographer. He wasn't over five feet tall and did not weigh more than 130 lbs - but then, some of the finest things in the world come in small packages, like diamonds," wrote Roy.

Pramathesh Barua entered films at a crucial period. Cinema was still uncertain about its status and identity, finding itself trapped between culture and entertainment. It did not have its role clearly etched out, or even a definite identity supported either by the social system within which it functioned or as an important form and language of artistic, creative expression. When Barua entered the cinema, many stalwarts were pioneers in different fields of cinema in their own right. Among them were technicians, actors, directors and writers who tried to give a distinct Indian identity to the cinema by shaping it to suit the taste of an essentially Indian audience. They included Dhirendranath Ganguly, Debaki Kumar Bose and Dinesh Ranjan Das. The cinema began to grow in importance as a form of creative expression among these pioneers. Some ordinary people, reckless enough to venture into hitherto uncharted territory, began to accept the different areas of films as a vocation. Yet, people involved with cinema remained on the margins of social acceptance and respect. These contradictory elements must have touched a chord somewhere in the mind of Barua, who gave recklessness a new definition and who had already had a taste of what cultural marginality was all about. This kind of uncertain yet open environment, conducive to experimentation and exploration in creativity, must have inspired Barua with the confidence to sustain his faith in creative freedom of expression through the cinema.

He entered the film world during the pre-Second World War phase. He represented the archetypal mix of the feudal and the melancholic. Audiences today do not enjoy seeing him so much as a painted face, or a defeated lover, but identify him completely with the Devdas image that keeps haunting the jilted lover-boy everywhere in India.

Contents

Editor's Notevii
1Introduction1
2The Making of a Prince7
3The Making of a Creative Artist39
4The Real Devdas87
Filmography113

Pramathesh Chandra Barua : The Crownless Prince The Eternal Devdas (The Legends of Indian Cinema)

Item Code:
NAD980
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2008
Publisher:
Wisdom Tree
ISBN:
9788183281041
Size:
6.5 Inch X 6.5 Inch
Pages:
126 (Throughout B/W illustrations)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 334 gms
Price:
$22.00
Discounted:
$16.50   Shipping Free
You Save:
$5.50 (25%)
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Pramathesh Chandra Barua : The Crownless Prince The Eternal Devdas (The Legends of Indian Cinema)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 3077 times since 25th Feb, 2013
About the book

Pramathesh Chandra Barua or P.C. Barua as he was known, was an enigma through his life. Born into a royal family, this prince-turned-actor-director changed the theatrical manner of stylised acting into the conversational manner of real-life situations. His rise as an actor- director was matched with tragic failures in his personal life. Strangely, the last stage of his life resembled that of the hero he made famous - Devdas. Alcohol became his nemesis, he was consumed by tuberculosis, and died an untimely death. This book traces the life and towering achievements of one of the legends of Indian cinema.

About the Author

Shoma A. Chatterji, journalist and author, won the National Award (1991) for best film critic and the Best Film Critic Award from the Bengal Film Journalists' Association (1998). She won a research fellowship from the National Film Archives, Pune in 2004-2005 and is currently Senior Research Fellow of PSBT (Public Service Broadcasting Trust), Delhi. She won the second prize from the Sahitya Akademi for its Golden Short Story Translation Contest in 2007. She has been a jury at several International Film Festivals. She has authored sixteen books on cinema, gender issues, short fiction and urban history. She has been writing for thirty years and her Parama and Other Outsiders - The Cinema of Aparna Sen. won the National Award for the best book on cinema in 2003.

Editor’s Note

The story of Pramathesh Barua has all the makings of a fairy tale - the prince who became an actor and a filmmaker - dashing, flamboyant, handsome, talented and rich, transforming the cinema of his time.

But he was a prince steeped in melancholy who looked for solace in the arms of women, who found relief in alcohol, then died of tuberculosis when he was just 48. But not before he had made an indelible mark on Indian cinema. He introduced a daringly new style of acting - low-key, restrained, understated - in films that have stood the test of time. It was he who first brought on to the screen the doomed hero of Saratchandra Chatterjee's Devdas, the figure who clearly echoed Barua's own introverted, melancholy character. Devdas, the film and the character, reverberated through the country in the decades that followed. The romantic lover whose tragic flaw is the inability to be decisive and who dies yearning for his lost love. If one can pick a single character that shaped not only Indian cinema but Indian youth through decades, it was Devdas. Barua directed both the Bengali and Hindi versions, playing the protagonist himself in Bengali before directing K. L. Saigal in the Hindi version that followed. Both versions made Devdas into a cult figure.

In Mukti he also created the doomed figure, prepared to sacrifice himself. In Zindagi, with K. L. Saigal, the lovers are again forced to part. Death was the ending of many of his films - death by choice, or death or separation imposed by a cruel, unfeeling fate. Perhaps he himself was always haunted by the thought of his premature mortality. These were only four of the many films that Barua created, from the silent era through the challenging years of the thirties when he was with the legendary New Theatres.

Barua not only personified the characters he portrayed in his films as writer, director and often actor but his impact on Indian cinema when it was evolving in the early years is far- reaching. His influence extended far beyond his time. Raj Kapoor, Guru Dutt, Bimal Roy (who was the cameraman of Barua's Devdas before making his own version 20 years later) were his fervent admirers.

Like many of the great innovators and stylists of an early era, today they are hardly remembered. This book is part of a series to recall them with a sense of pride and acknowledge their immense contribution to the history of Indian cinema.

Shoma A. Chatterji is among the few today who writes of the legendary figures of the past with dedication and passion. In this book she brings alive one of Indian cinema's most charismatic figures.

Introduction

Pramathesh Chandra Barua, a real-life prince, was born in the royal family of Gauripur, Assam, in October 1903. Some accounts mention the date as October 10 while others say it was October 24. Such biographical confusions dot Barua whose life-story offers stuff more exciting than the scripts of the films he made. But they do not disturb the essence of the story. Rather, they add to the intrigue and the mystique of a man who changed the face of Indian cinema for all time to come-with his choice of stories from classical Bengali literature, with his personalised style of natural acting, with his technical innovations, some of them being turning points in Indian cinematic technique and last but not the least, with Devdas, the eternal lover, who continues to haunt young and old alike, well into the 21st century.

"He was a living legend in Bengali cinema. He was the heart-throb of millions, the idol of my adolescence," wrote the late Mukul Roy, who had a brief association with Barua in 1939 when he worked as a child-actor in a Barua film. "He was not only a great director and actor, but was also a brilliant photographer. He wasn't over five feet tall and did not weigh more than 130 lbs - but then, some of the finest things in the world come in small packages, like diamonds," wrote Roy.

Pramathesh Barua entered films at a crucial period. Cinema was still uncertain about its status and identity, finding itself trapped between culture and entertainment. It did not have its role clearly etched out, or even a definite identity supported either by the social system within which it functioned or as an important form and language of artistic, creative expression. When Barua entered the cinema, many stalwarts were pioneers in different fields of cinema in their own right. Among them were technicians, actors, directors and writers who tried to give a distinct Indian identity to the cinema by shaping it to suit the taste of an essentially Indian audience. They included Dhirendranath Ganguly, Debaki Kumar Bose and Dinesh Ranjan Das. The cinema began to grow in importance as a form of creative expression among these pioneers. Some ordinary people, reckless enough to venture into hitherto uncharted territory, began to accept the different areas of films as a vocation. Yet, people involved with cinema remained on the margins of social acceptance and respect. These contradictory elements must have touched a chord somewhere in the mind of Barua, who gave recklessness a new definition and who had already had a taste of what cultural marginality was all about. This kind of uncertain yet open environment, conducive to experimentation and exploration in creativity, must have inspired Barua with the confidence to sustain his faith in creative freedom of expression through the cinema.

He entered the film world during the pre-Second World War phase. He represented the archetypal mix of the feudal and the melancholic. Audiences today do not enjoy seeing him so much as a painted face, or a defeated lover, but identify him completely with the Devdas image that keeps haunting the jilted lover-boy everywhere in India.

Contents

Editor's Notevii
1Introduction1
2The Making of a Prince7
3The Making of a Creative Artist39
4The Real Devdas87
Filmography113
Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Ramnabami-Natak The Story of Ram and Nabami
Item Code: IDI710
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
Mahanayak Revisited: The World of Uttam Kumar
by Swapan Mullick
Paperback (Edition: 2013)
Tranquebar Press
Item Code: NAE304
$22.50$16.88
You save: $5.62 (25%)
The Man Who Spoke in Pictures – Bimal Roy
by Rinki Roy Bhattacharya
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
Penguin Books India Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAC435
$35.00$26.25
You save: $8.75 (25%)
Indian Cinema Through The Century
by S. Manjula
Hardcover (Edition: 2015)
Publications Division, Government of India
Item Code: NAK774
$35.00$26.25
You save: $8.75 (25%)
Indian Cinema Through The Century
by S. Manjula
Paperback (Edition: 2015)
Publications Division, Government of India
Item Code: NAK961
$35.00$26.25
You save: $8.75 (25%)
Eminent Indians Film Personalities
by M.L. Ahuja
Paperback (Edition: 2007)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAF242
$11.50$8.62
You save: $2.88 (25%)
100 Bollywood Films
by Rachel Dwyer
Paperback (Edition: 2005)
Roli Books Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDF157
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
Traditional Indian Theatre: Multiple Streams
by Kapila Vatsyayan
Paperback (Edition: 2005)
National Book Trust, India
Item Code: IDE959
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
Mother Maiden Mistress (Women in Hindi Cinema, 1950-2010)
by Bhawana Somaaya& Jigna Kothari & Supriya Madangarli&
Paperback (Edition: 2012)
Harper Collins Publishers
Item Code: NAD275
$25.00$18.75
You save: $6.25 (25%)
Modern Indian Theatre (A Reader)
by Nandi Bhatia
Paperback (Edition: 2013)
Oxford University Press
Item Code: NAH520
$40.50$30.38
You save: $10.12 (25%)
The Essential Mystery – Major Filmmakers of Indian Art Cinema
by John W Hood
Paperback (Edition: 2009)
Orient Black Swan
Item Code: NAC724
$40.00$30.00
You save: $10.00 (25%)

Testimonials

I have been your customer for many years and everything has always been A++++++++++++ quality.
Delia, USA
I am your customer for many years. I love your products. Thanks for sending high quality products.
Nata, USA
I have been a customer for many years due to the quality products and service.
Mr. Hartley, UK.
Got the package on 9th Nov. I have to say it was one of the excellent packaging I have seen, worth my money I paid. And the books where all in best new conditions as they can be.
Nabahat, Bikaner
Whatever we bought from Exotic India has been wonderful. Excellent transaction,very reasonable price excellent delivery. We bought so many huge statues, clothes, decorative items, jewels etc. Every item was packed with love.
Tom and Roma Florida USA
Namaste. I want to thank you as I have received the statue and I shall always remember the service provided to such good standards.
Dr. B. Saha, UK
I received my Green Tara statue today and it's absolutely lovely, much nicer than I'd hoped--thank you so much for arranging its manufacture for me!
Betsy, California
Parcel received is brilliantly packed by your dispatch team. Excellent collection, beautiful Micro-art work. The items are exactly same as displayed. Hats-off to the collection team. The shiva linga Ring & Garuda pendant were superb. Its pleasure shopping every time. God bless your team with good energy to continue this Real collection work.
Badarinath, India
Jamavar arrived so quickly and is beautiful, thank you!
Caro
Your service is exceptional. I am very pleased with your professionalism.
Shambhu, USA
TRUSTe online privacy certification
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2016 © Exotic India