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Books > Hindu > Art > Shruti Artha Muktavali
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Shruti Artha Muktavali
Shruti Artha Muktavali
Description
Preface

This work, Srutyarthamuktavali, is anthology of articles written by V.K. Narayana bhattatiti (1880-1354), who was an eminent Vedic scholar and silent social activist. Born in the year 1880 in a family of traditional Vedic scholarship in the Trichur district of Kerala, he was brought up in the rigorous traditional system of Vedic learning. When most of the brilliant youth of the times trained in the Vedic scholarship either turned of Marxism or attracted to the National freedom movement Narayana bhattatiri took to serious research in quest of the quintessence of Vedas. In him we find a rare combination of traditional Vedic scholarship Gandhian ideals like simplicity and honesty and the intellectually revolutionary ideas of Aurobindo Ghosh.

At a time when orthodox tradition in Kerala was opposed to Namputiri Brahmins learning English Bhattatiri boldy ventured to learn that foreign language and as a result he came in contact with outside world brimming with variegated life styles and welcome streams of thought. Though he could not complete the formal course on sastraic knowledge he was rapidly progressing well in acquiring satraic knowledge through informal channels available outside kerala.

Bhattatiri took particular interest in unveiling the purport of the Veda mystically covered by the mantra language. Initially he was attracted by the interpretations of Dayananda Sarasvati but soon he found himself trading the path of Aurobino. He was very much fascinated by Aurobindo style of interpreting Vedamantras. But we can find that he never underestimated the contributions of Sayanacarya as a pioneer in the field. Also we cannot fail to notice that he draws heavily from Yaska nirukta leading a simply life he spent most of his time in learning Vedas.

Bhattatiri was equally keen in transmitting and sharing the knowledge he had acquired (with great pains) with the common people. He wrote brief articles in Malayalam language which were published in popular journals and leading periodicals. His style was clear and simple. Developing a single idea in an article he makes it a point not to deviate from the point at hand or to thrust a corpus of ideas in pedantic language upon the reader. He was particularly keen in opening the huge doors of the strong room of Vedic knowledge to all people irrespective of caste or creed. Through these articles he championed the cause of women education the study of Sanskrit etc. he subscribed to and advocated the view that any true seeker of Vedic wisdom is entitled to learn it (jijnasuh vedadhikari). Among his numerous articles on Vedic wisdom we find topic relating to social aspects and social reformation. The statues of women in Vedic period Veda and women, Hindu Muslim harmony uplift the downtrodden who is eligible for temple entry?' are some such articles. Apart from these articles on Vedic wisdom he has authored commentaries on Brahmasutra and patanjalayoasutra. His articles on Vedic knowledge are posthumously compiled in five books (Viz vedasandesam, vedascarupam, yajnasamskaram, vedam dharmmaulam, and Vedarthavicaram). The articles being presently compiled are selected from these and translated into Sanskrit.

I may now share with the readers my feelings at different stage of editing this work. When Sri P. Chandrasekharn (Managing Trustee, V.K. Narayan Bhattathiri Memorial Trust Calicut 673003) approached me with a bundle of bhattatiri articles as translated by Sri K.P. Vinod kumar I happily agreed to undertake the editorial work of the script. My happiness sprouted from of ideas espoused by Bhattatiri in interpreting the Vedas. The second reason is that Sri K.P. Vinod Kumar a spiritually evolved soul is one of my dear students. Bu soon I realized that the task which I undertook was not that happy or easy one for the following reasons: (1) Bhattatiri target was general public and not the academic world whereas the readers of this book would naturally be academics. (2) Bhattatiri wrote for Malayali readers whereas our readers would be Sanskritists. A Sanskrit reader would be familiar with the sastraic literature and Vedic wisdom. Bhattatiri very often explains elementary concepts and ideas of sastraic and vedic wisdom in a layman's language which when literally translated into Sanskrit would seem to be preposterous with the cultural gleanings of that rich classical language. (3) And last but not the least Bhattatiri style of language is more akin to oration than to coherent readers-oriented writing which at time causes intellectual gap in the stream of thought. Coming to Vinod kumar translation he strives hard to be honest in translation. At times he is seen overstretching for maintaining perfection. But then he gave me full liberty to make any kind of alteration or correction. Sri Chandrasekharan also gave me complete editorial freedom. Encouraged by this support I have sincerely attempted to make this work readable and appealing to the community of sanskritiests the world over. Let me hasten to add that this does not surmount to a claim that this work is perfect in all respects.

I take it as my pleasant duty to knowledge the help rendered by another student and friend of mine, Dr A. R. Anil kumar in preparing the computer CD of the text.

Eminent scholar and venerable teacher Prof. R. Vasudevan Potti (Sivadham, 28/1330, Sreekantheswaram Fort PO Thiruvananthapuram) was kind enough to go through the entire proof of the text. His valuable suggestions have gone to improve the quality of the work. He has also blessed us with a felicitatory note. I reverentially pay my obeisance to this Great Mater.

May I take this opportunity to record my deep sense of reverence and gratitude to all those souls who have been making me what I am.

Preface

This work, Srutyarthamuktavali, is anthology of articles written by V.K. Narayana bhattatiti (1880-1354), who was an eminent Vedic scholar and silent social activist. Born in the year 1880 in a family of traditional Vedic scholarship in the Trichur district of Kerala, he was brought up in the rigorous traditional system of Vedic learning. When most of the brilliant youth of the times trained in the Vedic scholarship either turned of Marxism or attracted to the National freedom movement Narayana bhattatiri took to serious research in quest of the quintessence of Vedas. In him we find a rare combination of traditional Vedic scholarship Gandhian ideals like simplicity and honesty and the intellectually revolutionary ideas of Aurobindo Ghosh.

At a time when orthodox tradition in Kerala was opposed to Namputiri Brahmins learning English Bhattatiri boldy ventured to learn that foreign language and as a result he came in contact with outside world brimming with variegated life styles and welcome streams of thought. Though he could not complete the formal course on sastraic knowledge he was rapidly progressing well in acquiring satraic knowledge through informal channels available outside kerala.

Bhattatiri took particular interest in unveiling the purport of the Veda mystically covered by the mantra language. Initially he was attracted by the interpretations of Dayananda Sarasvati but soon he found himself trading the path of Aurobino. He was very much fascinated by Aurobindo style of interpreting Vedamantras. But we can find that he never underestimated the contributions of Sayanacarya as a pioneer in the field. Also we cannot fail to notice that he draws heavily from Yaska nirukta leading a simply life he spent most of his time in learning Vedas.

Bhattatiri was equally keen in transmitting and sharing the knowledge he had acquired (with great pains) with the common people. He wrote brief articles in Malayalam language which were published in popular journals and leading periodicals. His style was clear and simple. Developing a single idea in an article he makes it a point not to deviate from the point at hand or to thrust a corpus of ideas in pedantic language upon the reader. He was particularly keen in opening the huge doors of the strong room of Vedic knowledge to all people irrespective of caste or creed. Through these articles he championed the cause of women education the study of Sanskrit etc. he subscribed to and advocated the view that any true seeker of Vedic wisdom is entitled to learn it (jijnasuh vedadhikari). Among his numerous articles on Vedic wisdom we find topic relating to social aspects and social reformation. The statues of women in Vedic period Veda and women, Hindu Muslim harmony uplift the downtrodden who is eligible for temple entry?' are some such articles. Apart from these articles on Vedic wisdom he has authored commentaries on Brahmasutra and patanjalayoasutra. His articles on Vedic knowledge are posthumously compiled in five books (Viz vedasandesam, vedascarupam, yajnasamskaram, vedam dharmmaulam, and Vedarthavicaram). The articles being presently compiled are selected from these and translated into Sanskrit.

I may now share with the readers my feelings at different stage of editing this work. When Sri P. Chandrasekharn (Managing Trustee, V.K. Narayan Bhattathiri Memorial Trust Calicut 673003) approached me with a bundle of bhattatiri articles as translated by Sri K.P. Vinod kumar I happily agreed to undertake the editorial work of the script. My happiness sprouted from of ideas espoused by Bhattatiri in interpreting the Vedas. The second reason is that Sri K.P. Vinod Kumar a spiritually evolved soul is one of my dear students. Bu soon I realized that the task which I undertook was not that happy or easy one for the following reasons: (1) Bhattatiri target was general public and not the academic world whereas the readers of this book would naturally be academics. (2) Bhattatiri wrote for Malayali readers whereas our readers would be Sanskritists. A Sanskrit reader would be familiar with the sastraic literature and Vedic wisdom. Bhattatiri very often explains elementary concepts and ideas of sastraic and vedic wisdom in a layman's language which when literally translated into Sanskrit would seem to be preposterous with the cultural gleanings of that rich classical language. (3) And last but not the least Bhattatiri style of language is more akin to oration than to coherent readers-oriented writing which at time causes intellectual gap in the stream of thought. Coming to Vinod kumar translation he strives hard to be honest in translation. At times he is seen overstretching for maintaining perfection. But then he gave me full liberty to make any kind of alteration or correction. Sri Chandrasekharan also gave me complete editorial freedom. Encouraged by this support I have sincerely attempted to make this work readable and appealing to the community of sanskritiests the world over. Let me hasten to add that this does not surmount to a claim that this work is perfect in all respects.

I take it as my pleasant duty to knowledge the help rendered by another student and friend of mine, Dr A. R. Anil kumar in preparing the computer CD of the text.

Eminent scholar and venerable teacher Prof. R. Vasudevan Potti (Sivadham, 28/1330, Sreekantheswaram Fort PO Thiruvananthapuram) was kind enough to go through the entire proof of the text. His valuable suggestions have gone to improve the quality of the work. He has also blessed us with a felicitatory note. I reverentially pay my obeisance to this Great Mater.

May I take this opportunity to record my deep sense of reverence and gratitude to all those souls who have been making me what I am.

Shruti Artha Muktavali

Item Code:
NZA158
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2008
ISBN:
9788172764135
Language:
Sanskrit
Size:
8.5 inch X 5.5 inch
Pages:
120
Other Details:
Weight of the Book : 150 gms
Price:
$10.00   Shipping Free
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Preface

This work, Srutyarthamuktavali, is anthology of articles written by V.K. Narayana bhattatiti (1880-1354), who was an eminent Vedic scholar and silent social activist. Born in the year 1880 in a family of traditional Vedic scholarship in the Trichur district of Kerala, he was brought up in the rigorous traditional system of Vedic learning. When most of the brilliant youth of the times trained in the Vedic scholarship either turned of Marxism or attracted to the National freedom movement Narayana bhattatiri took to serious research in quest of the quintessence of Vedas. In him we find a rare combination of traditional Vedic scholarship Gandhian ideals like simplicity and honesty and the intellectually revolutionary ideas of Aurobindo Ghosh.

At a time when orthodox tradition in Kerala was opposed to Namputiri Brahmins learning English Bhattatiri boldy ventured to learn that foreign language and as a result he came in contact with outside world brimming with variegated life styles and welcome streams of thought. Though he could not complete the formal course on sastraic knowledge he was rapidly progressing well in acquiring satraic knowledge through informal channels available outside kerala.

Bhattatiri took particular interest in unveiling the purport of the Veda mystically covered by the mantra language. Initially he was attracted by the interpretations of Dayananda Sarasvati but soon he found himself trading the path of Aurobino. He was very much fascinated by Aurobindo style of interpreting Vedamantras. But we can find that he never underestimated the contributions of Sayanacarya as a pioneer in the field. Also we cannot fail to notice that he draws heavily from Yaska nirukta leading a simply life he spent most of his time in learning Vedas.

Bhattatiri was equally keen in transmitting and sharing the knowledge he had acquired (with great pains) with the common people. He wrote brief articles in Malayalam language which were published in popular journals and leading periodicals. His style was clear and simple. Developing a single idea in an article he makes it a point not to deviate from the point at hand or to thrust a corpus of ideas in pedantic language upon the reader. He was particularly keen in opening the huge doors of the strong room of Vedic knowledge to all people irrespective of caste or creed. Through these articles he championed the cause of women education the study of Sanskrit etc. he subscribed to and advocated the view that any true seeker of Vedic wisdom is entitled to learn it (jijnasuh vedadhikari). Among his numerous articles on Vedic wisdom we find topic relating to social aspects and social reformation. The statues of women in Vedic period Veda and women, Hindu Muslim harmony uplift the downtrodden who is eligible for temple entry?' are some such articles. Apart from these articles on Vedic wisdom he has authored commentaries on Brahmasutra and patanjalayoasutra. His articles on Vedic knowledge are posthumously compiled in five books (Viz vedasandesam, vedascarupam, yajnasamskaram, vedam dharmmaulam, and Vedarthavicaram). The articles being presently compiled are selected from these and translated into Sanskrit.

I may now share with the readers my feelings at different stage of editing this work. When Sri P. Chandrasekharn (Managing Trustee, V.K. Narayan Bhattathiri Memorial Trust Calicut 673003) approached me with a bundle of bhattatiri articles as translated by Sri K.P. Vinod kumar I happily agreed to undertake the editorial work of the script. My happiness sprouted from of ideas espoused by Bhattatiri in interpreting the Vedas. The second reason is that Sri K.P. Vinod Kumar a spiritually evolved soul is one of my dear students. Bu soon I realized that the task which I undertook was not that happy or easy one for the following reasons: (1) Bhattatiri target was general public and not the academic world whereas the readers of this book would naturally be academics. (2) Bhattatiri wrote for Malayali readers whereas our readers would be Sanskritists. A Sanskrit reader would be familiar with the sastraic literature and Vedic wisdom. Bhattatiri very often explains elementary concepts and ideas of sastraic and vedic wisdom in a layman's language which when literally translated into Sanskrit would seem to be preposterous with the cultural gleanings of that rich classical language. (3) And last but not the least Bhattatiri style of language is more akin to oration than to coherent readers-oriented writing which at time causes intellectual gap in the stream of thought. Coming to Vinod kumar translation he strives hard to be honest in translation. At times he is seen overstretching for maintaining perfection. But then he gave me full liberty to make any kind of alteration or correction. Sri Chandrasekharan also gave me complete editorial freedom. Encouraged by this support I have sincerely attempted to make this work readable and appealing to the community of sanskritiests the world over. Let me hasten to add that this does not surmount to a claim that this work is perfect in all respects.

I take it as my pleasant duty to knowledge the help rendered by another student and friend of mine, Dr A. R. Anil kumar in preparing the computer CD of the text.

Eminent scholar and venerable teacher Prof. R. Vasudevan Potti (Sivadham, 28/1330, Sreekantheswaram Fort PO Thiruvananthapuram) was kind enough to go through the entire proof of the text. His valuable suggestions have gone to improve the quality of the work. He has also blessed us with a felicitatory note. I reverentially pay my obeisance to this Great Mater.

May I take this opportunity to record my deep sense of reverence and gratitude to all those souls who have been making me what I am.

Preface

This work, Srutyarthamuktavali, is anthology of articles written by V.K. Narayana bhattatiti (1880-1354), who was an eminent Vedic scholar and silent social activist. Born in the year 1880 in a family of traditional Vedic scholarship in the Trichur district of Kerala, he was brought up in the rigorous traditional system of Vedic learning. When most of the brilliant youth of the times trained in the Vedic scholarship either turned of Marxism or attracted to the National freedom movement Narayana bhattatiri took to serious research in quest of the quintessence of Vedas. In him we find a rare combination of traditional Vedic scholarship Gandhian ideals like simplicity and honesty and the intellectually revolutionary ideas of Aurobindo Ghosh.

At a time when orthodox tradition in Kerala was opposed to Namputiri Brahmins learning English Bhattatiri boldy ventured to learn that foreign language and as a result he came in contact with outside world brimming with variegated life styles and welcome streams of thought. Though he could not complete the formal course on sastraic knowledge he was rapidly progressing well in acquiring satraic knowledge through informal channels available outside kerala.

Bhattatiri took particular interest in unveiling the purport of the Veda mystically covered by the mantra language. Initially he was attracted by the interpretations of Dayananda Sarasvati but soon he found himself trading the path of Aurobino. He was very much fascinated by Aurobindo style of interpreting Vedamantras. But we can find that he never underestimated the contributions of Sayanacarya as a pioneer in the field. Also we cannot fail to notice that he draws heavily from Yaska nirukta leading a simply life he spent most of his time in learning Vedas.

Bhattatiri was equally keen in transmitting and sharing the knowledge he had acquired (with great pains) with the common people. He wrote brief articles in Malayalam language which were published in popular journals and leading periodicals. His style was clear and simple. Developing a single idea in an article he makes it a point not to deviate from the point at hand or to thrust a corpus of ideas in pedantic language upon the reader. He was particularly keen in opening the huge doors of the strong room of Vedic knowledge to all people irrespective of caste or creed. Through these articles he championed the cause of women education the study of Sanskrit etc. he subscribed to and advocated the view that any true seeker of Vedic wisdom is entitled to learn it (jijnasuh vedadhikari). Among his numerous articles on Vedic wisdom we find topic relating to social aspects and social reformation. The statues of women in Vedic period Veda and women, Hindu Muslim harmony uplift the downtrodden who is eligible for temple entry?' are some such articles. Apart from these articles on Vedic wisdom he has authored commentaries on Brahmasutra and patanjalayoasutra. His articles on Vedic knowledge are posthumously compiled in five books (Viz vedasandesam, vedascarupam, yajnasamskaram, vedam dharmmaulam, and Vedarthavicaram). The articles being presently compiled are selected from these and translated into Sanskrit.

I may now share with the readers my feelings at different stage of editing this work. When Sri P. Chandrasekharn (Managing Trustee, V.K. Narayan Bhattathiri Memorial Trust Calicut 673003) approached me with a bundle of bhattatiri articles as translated by Sri K.P. Vinod kumar I happily agreed to undertake the editorial work of the script. My happiness sprouted from of ideas espoused by Bhattatiri in interpreting the Vedas. The second reason is that Sri K.P. Vinod Kumar a spiritually evolved soul is one of my dear students. Bu soon I realized that the task which I undertook was not that happy or easy one for the following reasons: (1) Bhattatiri target was general public and not the academic world whereas the readers of this book would naturally be academics. (2) Bhattatiri wrote for Malayali readers whereas our readers would be Sanskritists. A Sanskrit reader would be familiar with the sastraic literature and Vedic wisdom. Bhattatiri very often explains elementary concepts and ideas of sastraic and vedic wisdom in a layman's language which when literally translated into Sanskrit would seem to be preposterous with the cultural gleanings of that rich classical language. (3) And last but not the least Bhattatiri style of language is more akin to oration than to coherent readers-oriented writing which at time causes intellectual gap in the stream of thought. Coming to Vinod kumar translation he strives hard to be honest in translation. At times he is seen overstretching for maintaining perfection. But then he gave me full liberty to make any kind of alteration or correction. Sri Chandrasekharan also gave me complete editorial freedom. Encouraged by this support I have sincerely attempted to make this work readable and appealing to the community of sanskritiests the world over. Let me hasten to add that this does not surmount to a claim that this work is perfect in all respects.

I take it as my pleasant duty to knowledge the help rendered by another student and friend of mine, Dr A. R. Anil kumar in preparing the computer CD of the text.

Eminent scholar and venerable teacher Prof. R. Vasudevan Potti (Sivadham, 28/1330, Sreekantheswaram Fort PO Thiruvananthapuram) was kind enough to go through the entire proof of the text. His valuable suggestions have gone to improve the quality of the work. He has also blessed us with a felicitatory note. I reverentially pay my obeisance to this Great Mater.

May I take this opportunity to record my deep sense of reverence and gratitude to all those souls who have been making me what I am.

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