Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
Share
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Books > Art and Architecture > Somanatha and Other Mediaeval Temples in Kathiawad
Displaying 235 of 1588         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Somanatha and Other Mediaeval Temples in Kathiawad
Somanatha and Other Mediaeval Temples in Kathiawad
Description

Introduction

The geopraphical position of Kathiawad, or Saurashtra as it was originally called, almost surrounded as it is by water, cuts it off from the rest of the mainland, save in the north where, by a narrow neck, it joins on to northern Gujarat. Its isolation was, perhaps, in olden times, more complete that it is now, when the gulf of Kachh, in its upper reaches, penetrated further inland and was not so far separated from the head of the gulf of Cambay. Its connection with Gujarat and Rajputana, on the north, has resulted, especially in mediaeval times, in its historical associations with those countries being very closely interwoven. From early days the peninsula has thus formed a complete cul-de-sac to invasions from the north, not only of tribes bent upon exploiting new regions and seeking new homes, but also of architectural styles and modes of worship which, filtering southwards through the Panjab and Sind, entered the country only to be brought up against its encircling belt of waters, and to spread along its southern shores. Hence the prevalence, in these parts, in early times, of Sun-worship and temples whose ruins show a remarkable likeness to those to be found in the valleys of Kasmir.

The whole of the southern and south-eastern districts constitute classic ground, for it was here that Krishna lived and carried out many of his exploits after his departure from Mathura and it was here, also, in the vicinity of the sacred city of Prabhas-Pattan, that he eventually met his death at the hands of a careless hunter. To describe his achievements in this region would be to repeat much of what may be found in any book upon Hindu mythology. In those early days, when he is supposed to have lived, Saurashtra was only populated, to any extent, around its shores, and the central portion of the peninsula was clothed with forests and was practically unoccupied: it is in the southern and south-eastern parts that the oldest remains are found. For relics of a far-away prehistoric age we have only to go to the little island of Perim, off the coast near Gogo, where the bones of long-extinct mammals are to be found. For relics of a far-away prehistoric age we have only to go to the little island of Perim, off the coast near Gogo, where the bones of long-extinct mammals are to be found, and where the fossilized mammoth has been succeeded by two monolithic elephants, one of which still stood intact upon the shore in 1840. In this south-eastern corner of Kathiawad we have the sites of the ancient towns of Valabhi, Mul Dwarka (the ancient Dwarka, said to have been destroyed by a tidal wave on the death of Krishna), Madhavpur, where Krishna married Rukmini, Tulshishyam, Sudampuri (Porbandar), Vamansthali (Wanthali), and other the Buddhist cave-temples at Junagadh, Talaja, Sana, Dhank and Siddhesvara; and the sacred hills of Girnar and Palitana. In mediaeval times, however, central Saurashtra must have been well populated, as we can gather from the very numerous ruins of highly decorated stone temples such as are found at Sejakpur, Than, Anandapur, Parbadi, Chaubari and Wadhwan; and it is with these, and the famous shrine of Somanatha at Prabhas-Pattan, together with some along the south coast, that we are concerned in this monograph. The cave-temples have already been fully described, and the important site of Valabhi, dating from the fifth century A.D., has not yet been sufficiently explored to include it.

Saurashtra was included in one of the four provinces into which Chandragupta divided his kingdom about B.C. 332, and the Sudarsana lake, near Junagadh and beneath the slopes of Girnar, mentioned in the inscription on the famous Asoka rock at that place, was constructed by Syena Pushyagupta, governor of the province under that emperor. Asoka, though he caused his famous edicts to be published here upon this rock, did not, himself, visit Saurashtra. After the Mauryas, Saurashtra remained under Pushyamitra of the Sunga dynasty until B.C. 155, after which it was conquered and annexed by Menaner, king of the Panjab and Kabul. Later, followed the Sakas, who established the dynasty of Satraps, or Kshatrapas, when Nahapana, the second Kshatrapa king was overthrown by the Andhras and about 338, Saurashtra was added to the Magadh kingdom. After the death of Skandagupta, about A.D. 470, the Bhattarka, or commander-in-chief, of the Hunasi entered Saurashtra, took possession, and declaring his independence, established the line of the valabhi kings which lasted for nearly three hundred years. He placed a governor at Vamansthali and founded Valabhinagar, a city which was, later on, visited by the Chinese pilgrim Hwien Thsang. It is recoded in a copper plate grant, which was found at Katpur and is now in the Bhavanagar museum, that Sun-worship was followed by the Valabhi king Dharasena II (A.D. 571).

After the fall of Valabhi, the chief inhabitants of Saurashtra were the Rajputs, as represented by the Jethwas, Chavadas and Walas, the latter supposed to be a survival of the Valabhi dynasty. There were also the Ahers, Rabaris, Mers, Bhils and Kolis. The Jethwas were the oldest Rajput race in Saurashtra, their ancestors being supposed to have been the Scythians of the north, who were settled in Kasmir in the first century A.D. The present home of the Jethwa family is Porbandar and it is in this district that those very early shrines are principally found which are so like those met with in Kasmir of the same age. The Jethwas were, at first, established at Srinagar, not far from Porbandar; subsequently they built and fortified Ghumli in the Barda hills, where the ruins of the finest of these old temples are found, whence they moved to Ranpur about 1313, after Ghumli had been conquered and destroyed by the Jadejas, under Jam Bamanioji from Kachh; and then, in 1574, to Chayya, a mile and a half east of Porbandar. Jethwa bards relate that the fourth ruler of Ghumli built the temple of the Sun at Srinagar in Saurashtra.

After the destruction of Valabhinagar, Anhillavada-Pattan, in northern Gujarat, rose to importance; and it is with the rulers of that state that Saurashtra became more intimately connected, and with whom we are more particularly interested in the later mediaeval temples in the province. The founder of this dynasty was Wan Raj of the Chavada family, whose members are reputed by some to have been Sun-worshippers. Other tribes settled down in turn, in different parts of the peninsula, amongst them being the Gohels who established themselves at Mangrol in the eighth century. The Mers are supposed to have come from the north with the Jethwas, and those of them who entered Saurashtra settled down about Porbandar. At the installation of a Jethwa prince, at that palce, a Mer has the privilege of making the blood-mark upon his forehead. The Chudasamas, who settled at Vamansthali (Wanthali), originally came from Sind; and about A.D. 875, Ra Chuda founded the Chuda same dynasty which lasted for nearly six hundred years, when the dynasty and state were engulfed in the flowing tide of Muhammadan conquest. The Chudasama ruler Graharipu or Grahario I, an Abhir, or shepherd, by caste, built the fort of Junagadh, now known as the Uparkot, and it was against this chief that the Solanki ruler of Gujarat, Mulraj, after a dream in which Mahadeva appeared to him, marched from Anhillavada-Pattan. This Graharipu lived at Vamansthali "the city rendered splendid by the flags of Hanuman and Garuda," and as the ruler of Saurashtra Desa, killed the pilgrims going to Prabhasa and cast their flesh and bones entire in the way, so that though people wished to go to that tirtha, no one could do so from this terror. He ate the flesh of animals and drank spirituous liquor, and in the fight he fed the Bhutas and Pisachas and all their crew with the blood of enemies. He was taken prisoner and died in A.D. 982. After this, Mulraja went on to Somanatha, and worshipped there before returning to his capital.

The next event of importance, fraught with great menace to the prestige of Hinduism, was the ever-memorable invasion of Mahmud of Ghazni in A.D. 1025 and the sack of the temple and city of Somanatha-Pattan. How he marched into Sorath, laid siege to the famous temple, desecrated and looted its shrine, and finally departed laden with spoils, will be found more fully described in the account of the ruins at that place. The story almost reads like a repetition of that of Muhammad Qasim's famous siege of Debal and its great temple, when the Arabs first invaded Sind more than three hundred years before. At this time Prabhas-Pattan was nominally under the rule of the Solankis of Anhillavada.

About 1090 the Jala Rajputs settled in Saurashtra, having come from Keranti near Nagar Parkar in Sind, and about the same time the Kathis first entered the province. They are said to have migrated from Sind, that great corridor from the north, to Kachh where they established themselves for a time at Pavagadh. They were Sun-worshippers; and leaving their old than in the Panjab, which became the Mul(old) than, established themselves, eventually, at their new than in Saurashtra. After them the province became known as Kathiawas. At this time the Chudasama Ras of Vamansthali were still the most important rulers in the south, at least, of Kathiawad, and it was in 1098 that Ra Navaghana II removed his capital to the Uparkot (Junagadh). The famous Siddharaja Solanki was being felt more than ever throughout Kathiawad. He was a great builder and consequently most of the finest old temples of northern Gujarat are almost invariably, ascribed to him; indeed the ordinary villagers, when in doubt of the origin of any old building, unhesitatingly credit him with its construction. But Siddharaja Jayasimha was personally connected with Kathiawad, for he was born in the province, close to the village of Dhandalpur, four kos to the west of Sejakpur, where he afterwards constructed a well and founded Dhundalpur, now Dhandalpur. There is no doubt, however, that the finest architectural works were carried out by him and his successor, Kumarapala. Two notable instances of these are the temples of the great Rudra Mala at Siddhapur and the reconstruction of Somanatha at Prabhas-Pattan; and about this time, were constructed the beautiful marble temple of Vimala Sha on Mount Abu and the temple of the Sun at Mudhera.

 

Contents

 

INTRODUCTION 1
SOMANATHA-PATTAN 11
ERAVAL 34
GHUMLI 36
GOP 37
KADVAR 38
BILESVARA 40
SUTRAPADA 41
KINDERKHEDA 42
VISAVADA 44
THAN 46
WADHWAN 53
SEJAKPUR 57
ANANDAPUR 60
PARBADI 62
CHAUBARI 63
MANGROL 64
MIANI 68
BAGAVADAR 71
WACHODA 72
SATRUNJAYA 73
GIRNAR 86
MISCELLANEOUS 87
GLOSSARY  

 

Sample Pages




















Somanatha and Other Mediaeval Temples in Kathiawad

Item Code:
IDJ485
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
1998
Publisher:
Archaeological Survey of India
Language:
English
Size:
10.6" X 8.4"
Pages:
206 (106 Illustrated throughout in Black & White)
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 1.0 Kg
Price:
$50.00   Shipping Free - 4 to 6 days
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Somanatha and Other Mediaeval Temples in Kathiawad

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 7006 times since 28th Apr, 2016

Introduction

The geopraphical position of Kathiawad, or Saurashtra as it was originally called, almost surrounded as it is by water, cuts it off from the rest of the mainland, save in the north where, by a narrow neck, it joins on to northern Gujarat. Its isolation was, perhaps, in olden times, more complete that it is now, when the gulf of Kachh, in its upper reaches, penetrated further inland and was not so far separated from the head of the gulf of Cambay. Its connection with Gujarat and Rajputana, on the north, has resulted, especially in mediaeval times, in its historical associations with those countries being very closely interwoven. From early days the peninsula has thus formed a complete cul-de-sac to invasions from the north, not only of tribes bent upon exploiting new regions and seeking new homes, but also of architectural styles and modes of worship which, filtering southwards through the Panjab and Sind, entered the country only to be brought up against its encircling belt of waters, and to spread along its southern shores. Hence the prevalence, in these parts, in early times, of Sun-worship and temples whose ruins show a remarkable likeness to those to be found in the valleys of Kasmir.

The whole of the southern and south-eastern districts constitute classic ground, for it was here that Krishna lived and carried out many of his exploits after his departure from Mathura and it was here, also, in the vicinity of the sacred city of Prabhas-Pattan, that he eventually met his death at the hands of a careless hunter. To describe his achievements in this region would be to repeat much of what may be found in any book upon Hindu mythology. In those early days, when he is supposed to have lived, Saurashtra was only populated, to any extent, around its shores, and the central portion of the peninsula was clothed with forests and was practically unoccupied: it is in the southern and south-eastern parts that the oldest remains are found. For relics of a far-away prehistoric age we have only to go to the little island of Perim, off the coast near Gogo, where the bones of long-extinct mammals are to be found. For relics of a far-away prehistoric age we have only to go to the little island of Perim, off the coast near Gogo, where the bones of long-extinct mammals are to be found, and where the fossilized mammoth has been succeeded by two monolithic elephants, one of which still stood intact upon the shore in 1840. In this south-eastern corner of Kathiawad we have the sites of the ancient towns of Valabhi, Mul Dwarka (the ancient Dwarka, said to have been destroyed by a tidal wave on the death of Krishna), Madhavpur, where Krishna married Rukmini, Tulshishyam, Sudampuri (Porbandar), Vamansthali (Wanthali), and other the Buddhist cave-temples at Junagadh, Talaja, Sana, Dhank and Siddhesvara; and the sacred hills of Girnar and Palitana. In mediaeval times, however, central Saurashtra must have been well populated, as we can gather from the very numerous ruins of highly decorated stone temples such as are found at Sejakpur, Than, Anandapur, Parbadi, Chaubari and Wadhwan; and it is with these, and the famous shrine of Somanatha at Prabhas-Pattan, together with some along the south coast, that we are concerned in this monograph. The cave-temples have already been fully described, and the important site of Valabhi, dating from the fifth century A.D., has not yet been sufficiently explored to include it.

Saurashtra was included in one of the four provinces into which Chandragupta divided his kingdom about B.C. 332, and the Sudarsana lake, near Junagadh and beneath the slopes of Girnar, mentioned in the inscription on the famous Asoka rock at that place, was constructed by Syena Pushyagupta, governor of the province under that emperor. Asoka, though he caused his famous edicts to be published here upon this rock, did not, himself, visit Saurashtra. After the Mauryas, Saurashtra remained under Pushyamitra of the Sunga dynasty until B.C. 155, after which it was conquered and annexed by Menaner, king of the Panjab and Kabul. Later, followed the Sakas, who established the dynasty of Satraps, or Kshatrapas, when Nahapana, the second Kshatrapa king was overthrown by the Andhras and about 338, Saurashtra was added to the Magadh kingdom. After the death of Skandagupta, about A.D. 470, the Bhattarka, or commander-in-chief, of the Hunasi entered Saurashtra, took possession, and declaring his independence, established the line of the valabhi kings which lasted for nearly three hundred years. He placed a governor at Vamansthali and founded Valabhinagar, a city which was, later on, visited by the Chinese pilgrim Hwien Thsang. It is recoded in a copper plate grant, which was found at Katpur and is now in the Bhavanagar museum, that Sun-worship was followed by the Valabhi king Dharasena II (A.D. 571).

After the fall of Valabhi, the chief inhabitants of Saurashtra were the Rajputs, as represented by the Jethwas, Chavadas and Walas, the latter supposed to be a survival of the Valabhi dynasty. There were also the Ahers, Rabaris, Mers, Bhils and Kolis. The Jethwas were the oldest Rajput race in Saurashtra, their ancestors being supposed to have been the Scythians of the north, who were settled in Kasmir in the first century A.D. The present home of the Jethwa family is Porbandar and it is in this district that those very early shrines are principally found which are so like those met with in Kasmir of the same age. The Jethwas were, at first, established at Srinagar, not far from Porbandar; subsequently they built and fortified Ghumli in the Barda hills, where the ruins of the finest of these old temples are found, whence they moved to Ranpur about 1313, after Ghumli had been conquered and destroyed by the Jadejas, under Jam Bamanioji from Kachh; and then, in 1574, to Chayya, a mile and a half east of Porbandar. Jethwa bards relate that the fourth ruler of Ghumli built the temple of the Sun at Srinagar in Saurashtra.

After the destruction of Valabhinagar, Anhillavada-Pattan, in northern Gujarat, rose to importance; and it is with the rulers of that state that Saurashtra became more intimately connected, and with whom we are more particularly interested in the later mediaeval temples in the province. The founder of this dynasty was Wan Raj of the Chavada family, whose members are reputed by some to have been Sun-worshippers. Other tribes settled down in turn, in different parts of the peninsula, amongst them being the Gohels who established themselves at Mangrol in the eighth century. The Mers are supposed to have come from the north with the Jethwas, and those of them who entered Saurashtra settled down about Porbandar. At the installation of a Jethwa prince, at that palce, a Mer has the privilege of making the blood-mark upon his forehead. The Chudasamas, who settled at Vamansthali (Wanthali), originally came from Sind; and about A.D. 875, Ra Chuda founded the Chuda same dynasty which lasted for nearly six hundred years, when the dynasty and state were engulfed in the flowing tide of Muhammadan conquest. The Chudasama ruler Graharipu or Grahario I, an Abhir, or shepherd, by caste, built the fort of Junagadh, now known as the Uparkot, and it was against this chief that the Solanki ruler of Gujarat, Mulraj, after a dream in which Mahadeva appeared to him, marched from Anhillavada-Pattan. This Graharipu lived at Vamansthali "the city rendered splendid by the flags of Hanuman and Garuda," and as the ruler of Saurashtra Desa, killed the pilgrims going to Prabhasa and cast their flesh and bones entire in the way, so that though people wished to go to that tirtha, no one could do so from this terror. He ate the flesh of animals and drank spirituous liquor, and in the fight he fed the Bhutas and Pisachas and all their crew with the blood of enemies. He was taken prisoner and died in A.D. 982. After this, Mulraja went on to Somanatha, and worshipped there before returning to his capital.

The next event of importance, fraught with great menace to the prestige of Hinduism, was the ever-memorable invasion of Mahmud of Ghazni in A.D. 1025 and the sack of the temple and city of Somanatha-Pattan. How he marched into Sorath, laid siege to the famous temple, desecrated and looted its shrine, and finally departed laden with spoils, will be found more fully described in the account of the ruins at that place. The story almost reads like a repetition of that of Muhammad Qasim's famous siege of Debal and its great temple, when the Arabs first invaded Sind more than three hundred years before. At this time Prabhas-Pattan was nominally under the rule of the Solankis of Anhillavada.

About 1090 the Jala Rajputs settled in Saurashtra, having come from Keranti near Nagar Parkar in Sind, and about the same time the Kathis first entered the province. They are said to have migrated from Sind, that great corridor from the north, to Kachh where they established themselves for a time at Pavagadh. They were Sun-worshippers; and leaving their old than in the Panjab, which became the Mul(old) than, established themselves, eventually, at their new than in Saurashtra. After them the province became known as Kathiawas. At this time the Chudasama Ras of Vamansthali were still the most important rulers in the south, at least, of Kathiawad, and it was in 1098 that Ra Navaghana II removed his capital to the Uparkot (Junagadh). The famous Siddharaja Solanki was being felt more than ever throughout Kathiawad. He was a great builder and consequently most of the finest old temples of northern Gujarat are almost invariably, ascribed to him; indeed the ordinary villagers, when in doubt of the origin of any old building, unhesitatingly credit him with its construction. But Siddharaja Jayasimha was personally connected with Kathiawad, for he was born in the province, close to the village of Dhandalpur, four kos to the west of Sejakpur, where he afterwards constructed a well and founded Dhundalpur, now Dhandalpur. There is no doubt, however, that the finest architectural works were carried out by him and his successor, Kumarapala. Two notable instances of these are the temples of the great Rudra Mala at Siddhapur and the reconstruction of Somanatha at Prabhas-Pattan; and about this time, were constructed the beautiful marble temple of Vimala Sha on Mount Abu and the temple of the Sun at Mudhera.

 

Contents

 

INTRODUCTION 1
SOMANATHA-PATTAN 11
ERAVAL 34
GHUMLI 36
GOP 37
KADVAR 38
BILESVARA 40
SUTRAPADA 41
KINDERKHEDA 42
VISAVADA 44
THAN 46
WADHWAN 53
SEJAKPUR 57
ANANDAPUR 60
PARBADI 62
CHAUBARI 63
MANGROL 64
MIANI 68
BAGAVADAR 71
WACHODA 72
SATRUNJAYA 73
GIRNAR 86
MISCELLANEOUS 87
GLOSSARY  

 

Sample Pages




















Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

Somnath Mahatmyam
by Yogacharya Santikumar J. Bhatt
Hardcover (Edition: 2003)
Chowkhamba Sanskrit Series Office
Item Code: IDG533
$22.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Islam Vis-A-Vis Hindu Temples
by Sita Ram Goel
Paperback (Edition: 2000)
Voice of India
Item Code: NAJ045
$10.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Temples of Western India
by Ambujam Anantharaman
Paperback (Edition: 2011)
Westland Ltd.
Item Code: NAE950
$22.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Spiritual India Handbook (A Guide to Temples, Holy Sites, Festivals and Traditions)
by Stephen Knapp
Paperback (Edition: 2013)
Jaico Books
Item Code: NAC590
$40.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Temple In South Asia: Archaeology and Text
by Himanshu Prabha Ray
Hardcover (Edition: 2010)
Oxford University Press
Item Code: IHG075
$50.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Kalhana - Makers of Indian Literature
by Somnath Dhar
Paperback (Edition: 1998)
Sahitya Akademi
Item Code: IDE087
$5.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Keeping The Faith (Memoirs of a Parliamentarian)
by Somnath Chatterjee
Hardcover (Edition: 2010)
Harper Collins Publishers
Item Code: NAJ238
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Temples of South India
by Ambujam Anantharaman
Paperback (Edition: 2009)
East West Books
Item Code: IHK089
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Monuments of India and the Indianized States: The Plans of major and Notable Temples, Tombs, Palace and Pavilions
by Fredrick W. Bunce
Hardcover (Edition: 2007)
D. K. Printworld (P) Ltd. - New Delhi
Item Code: IDI054
$90.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Krishna: A Journey Through the Lands and Legends of Krishna
by Dev Prasad
Paperback (Edition: 2010)
Jaico Publishing House
Item Code: NAC691
$28.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Heritage of Rajasthan: Monuments and Archaeological Sites
by
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
Aryan Books International
Item Code: NAB719
$125.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
101 Pilgrimages
Paperback (Edition: 2006)
Outlook Publishing (I) Pvt. Ltd., New Delhi.
Item Code: IDJ296
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
History of Indian and Eastern Architecture (Two Volumes)
by James Fergusson
Hardcover (Edition: 2011)
Rupa Publication Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAD477
$70.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
HISTORY OF INDIAN AND EASTERN ARCHITECTURE (2 Volumes)
Deal 10% Off
by JAMES FERGUSSON
Hardcover (Edition: 1998)
Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDG131
$95.00$85.50
You save: $9.50 (10%)
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Torana in Indian and Southeast Asian Architecture
by Parul Pandya Dhar
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
D. K. Printworld Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IHF076
$155.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

I recieved my Mahavir pendant today. It is wonderful. I was recently in Delhi and as it was a spiritual trip visiting Jain temples in Rajasthan, Agra, Rishikesh and Delhi i did not have the opportunity to shop much. The pendant is beautiful and i shall treasure it. I have attached a picture of me in India. Your country and the people will always be in my heart.
Evelyn, Desoto, Texas.
I received my Order this week, It's wonderful. I really thank you very much.
Antonio Freitas, Sao Paulo, Brazil.
I have been ordering from your site for several years and am always pleased with my orders and the time frame is lovely also. Thanks for being such a wonderful company.
Delia, USA
I recviced Book Air Parcel(Nadi-Astrology). I am glad to see this book. Thankx. Muhammad Arshad Nadeem Pakistan.
Muhammad Arshad Nadeem
It is always a great pleasure to return to Exotic India with its exquisit artwork, books and other items. As I said several times before, Exotic India is far more than a highly professional Indian online shop; it is in fact an excellent ambassador to the world for the splendour of Indian wisdom and spirituality. I wish a happy and successful New Year 2017 to Exotic India and its employees! You can be very proud of yourself!
Dr Michael Seeber (psychiatrist and psychotherapist, Essen/Germany)
My last order arrived in a reasonable amount of time, regarding the long way it had to take! I am glad to find this and some other ayurvedic remedy, as well as books and much other things at your online-store and I am looking forward to be your customer again, some time.
Andreas, Germany.
Намаскар! Честно говоря, сомневался. Но сегодня получил свой заказ. Порадовала упаковка, упаковано всё очень тщательно и аккуратно. Большое спасибо, как раз подарок к Новому Году! Namaskar! Frankly, I doubted. But today received my order. We were pleased with the packaging. Everything is packed carefully and accurately. Thank you very much, just a gift for the New Year!
Ruslan, Russia.
Thanks for the great sale!! It really helped me out. I love Exotic India.
Shannon, USA
I have got the 3 parcels with my order today and everything is perfect. Thank you very much for such a good packaging to protect the items and for your service.
Guadalupe, Spain
Great books! I am so glad you make them available to order, thank you!
Yevgen, USA
TRUSTe online privacy certification
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India