Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > Language and Literature > Talbis Iblis: Delusion of The Devil (Set of 2 Volumes)
Displaying 2562 of 4487         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Talbis Iblis: Delusion of The Devil (Set of 2 Volumes)
Pages from the book
Talbis Iblis: Delusion of The Devil (Set of 2 Volumes)
Look Inside the Book
Description
About The Book

Jamal al-Din Abu'I-Faraj 'Abd al-Rahman b. Ali, popularly known as Ibn al- Jauzi, 510 A.H.--- 599 A.H. (A.D. 1116 – A.D.1200), was the author of a vast number of work theological, historical, biographical, medical, philological, and entertaining of which several have been printed in recent times. He was famous as a preacher and the traveller Ibn Jubair gives an enthusiastic account of two of his sermons heard in Baghdad.

The work of which a translations is here offered is directed against the sins of contemporary society, which it traces to "delusion by the Devil." Its title (Talbis lblis) of which those words are a rendering, had been previously selected by Ghazali for a work of similar scope which he contemplated. Ibn Jauzi, though he handles Ghazali severely, adopted it by far the greater part of the book is criticism or censure of the Sufis, who, owing to the establishment of Orders by Ibn al-Rifa'i and 'Abd ai-Qadir al-Gilani in the sixth century of Islam, were beginning to render them, especially in North Africa, a political factor.

About The Author

Jamal al-Din Abu'l-Faraj 'Abd al-Rahman b. Ali, popularly known as Ibn al-Jauzi, 510 A.H.--- 599 A.H. (A.D. 1116-A.D.1200), was the author of a vast number of works-theological, historical, biographical, medical, philological, and entertaining-of which several have been printed in recent times. He was famous as a preacher and the traveller Ibn Jubair gives an enthusiastic account of two of his sermons heard in Baghdad.

We learn from this notice that he was court-preacher, and indeed devoted some of his eloquence to eulogy of the Caliph and the imperial household; which seems inconsistent with his repeated warnings to the learned against association with princes. His father, he tells us, died when he was very young, and his mother paid him no attention. Nevertheless he was brought up in luxury, so that his first attempts at abstinence produced an illness as this interfered with his devotions, he returned to a less ascetic diet, From his earliest years, he had a passion for the acquisition of knowledge, all departments of which he aspired to master. He claims to have read more than 20,000 volumes, Ibn Khallikan calls him the most learned man of his time. Specimens of his homities are to be found in his collection of Miscellanies, called al-Mudhish. Ibn Jubair's account of their effectiveness bears out what the author records on the subject. He was instrumental in bringing more than 200,000 Muslims to repentance and converting more than 200 members of other communities to Islam. On one occasion he found himself preaching to a congregation of more than 10,000 persons, all of whom had either softened hearts or weeping eyes.

Preface

The God has committed the balance of justice to the hands of the intelligent, and sent Apostles to promise reward and give warning of punishment; has revealed unto them the Books which explain wrong and right has established Codes that are perfect without fault or flaw. I praise Him as one who knows that he is the Causer of causes, and I attest His Unity, as one who is sincere in his intent and undoubting; and I testify that Muhammad is His Servant and His Envoy, sent at a time when infidelity had let down its evil over the face of faith, so that he cleared away darkness by the light of guidance, and revealed to him, and elucidating the difficulties of the Book: "leaving them on the white highroad, wherein is no pitfall and no mirage."

God be gracious unto him and all his households and Companions, and their successors, favouring them until the Day of Judgment and Reckoning: and may he give them perfect peace. The greatest benefit conferred on man is Reason, since that is the instrument whereby he acquires knowledge of God Almighty, and the else whereby he arrives at belief in the Apostles, Only in as much as it is insufficient for all that is required of a man, Apostles were sent and Books revealed. So the Code is like the sun, and the reason like the eye, which, if sound, when it is opened, sees the sun. When the veracious sayings of the Prophets are assured to the reason by the evidence of miracles, is surrenders to those Prophets, and relies of them for what is hidden from itself.

When God bestowed reason on the human world, he commenced with the prophethood of Adam; he kept instructing them according to God's inspiration, and they went right till Cain followed his selfish passion and slew his brother. Thereupon different passions swayed mankind, which sent them astray in the wilds of error, so that they worshipped idols and adopted divers beliefs and courses of action, disagreeing therein with the Prophets and their own reasons, and following their lusts, inclining to their customs and imitating their magnates.

The Devil was confirmed in his opinion of them, and they followed him, all but a party of Believers. You are to know that the prophets furnished adequate instruction, and met the ailments with certain remedies; they agreed in pursuing an invariable course. Satan proceeded to mingle doubts with the instruction, and poison with the medicine: misleading tracks with the plain road. Nor did he cease playing with their intellects so that they worshipped idols in the Sacred House, tabooed the sa'ibah, bahirah, wasilah, and ham, approved of burying girls alive deprived them of inheritance, with other forms of error suggested to them by the Devil. Then God Almighty sent Muhammad, who abolished the atrocities, and enjoined what was profitable. His Companions walked with him and after him in the illumination of his light, immune from transgression and its deceit. Only when the light of their existence was withdrawn the clouds of darkness came on. Passions once more generated innovations, narrowing a path, which had always been wide; most people became schismatic and sectarian.

The Devil proceeded to delude and beguile, to separate and combine. He can only play the robber in the night of ignorance; were the mourn of knowledge to break on him, he would be discredited. I thought, it may duty to warn against his wiles, and point out his traps, since to indicate a danger involves warning against falling into it. Now the two Sahih contain the following Tradition recorded by Hudhaifah people used to ask the Prophet about the good, whereas I would ask him about the bad, fearing lest it should overtake me. And indeed we have been informed by Abu'l-Barakat Sa'd Allah b. 'Ali al-Bazzar by a chain of authorities leading up to Ibn 'Abbas that the latter said. By Allah may thinks there is no-one on the earth's surface whose death would give greater pleasure to Satan than mine,-He was asked. How so? He replied: He starts an innovation in East or West, and someone brings it to me. When it gets to me, I confute it with the Sunnah, and it is returned to him as he issued it.

Contents (Volume-I)

Prefaceix
Chapter I
Let him hide himself without God's veil1
Chapter II
The way wherein the devil deludes those who believe in Miracles, wrought for the glory of saints23
The way wherein the devil deludes the Vulgar52
Chapter III
The way wherein the devil deludes the believers in "Shrines"57
The way wherein he deludes the Idolaters59
The commencement of his deluding the Idolaters59
The way wherein he deludes the fire-worshippers69
The way wherein he deludes the Arab pagans71
The way wherein he deludes the deniers of prophecy73
The devil put into the minds of the Brahmins six fallacies74
Chapter IV
The way wherein the devil deludes the dissidents81
Account of the way wherein he deludes the rejectors88
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Batiniyyah95
Account of the cause which led people to involve themselves in this heresy99
Speciments of their doctrines101
Chapter V
The way wherein the devil deludes the Jews and the Christians107
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Christians109
Account of the way wherein he deludes both Jews and Christians110
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Sabians111
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Mazdians112
Account of the way wherein he deludes those who deny the resurrection116
Account of the way wherein he deludes the believers in Transmigration117
Account of the way wherein he deludes our community in their beliefs and religious practices119
Chapter VI
The way wherein the devil deludes Savants in different departments of knowledge127
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Readers of the Qur'an127
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Traditionalists130
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the jurists135
Account of the way in which he deludes them into introducing into their disputation the talk of the philosophers, and into relying on their inventions136
Account of the way wherein he deludes preachers and story-tellers142
Account of the way wherein he deludes philologists and scholars145
Account of the way wherein he deludes the poets147
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the most accomplished scholars148
Chapter VII
The way wherein the devil deludes Governor and Sovereigns153
Chapter VIII
The way wherein the devil deludes Devotees and their devotion157
Account of his delusions in the matter of ablution158
Account of the way v. herein he deludes them in the Call to prayer158
Account of the way wherein he confuses them in prayer159
Account of the way wherein he deludes them over the reading of the Qur'an165
Account of the way wherein he deludes them in the matter of fasting166
Account of the way wherein he deludes them in the matter of pilgrimage168
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the raiders169
Account of the way wherein he deludes many of those among them who have a reputation for virtue171
Chapter IX
The way wherein the devil deludes ascetics and devotees175
Chapter X
The way where devil deludes the Sufis189
Enumeration of the false doctrines which are recorded of a number of them200
Chapter XI
The way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of puri fi cation207
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes them in prayer207
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of dwellings208
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Stlfis in the matter of giving up their property209
Refutation of the above view212
Contents (Volume-II)

Prefacevii
Chapter I
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of their clothing1
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis matters of food and drink11
Specimens of the conduct of the earlier Sufis11
Chapter II
The procedure and indication of the erros which involves in the devils delusion17
Section dealing with traditions which prove the error of their procedure25
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matters of music, dancing, and emotion29
Chapter III
The evidences which show that singing and wailing should he disapproved and forbidden39
Section dealing with the fallacies relied upon by those who permit listening to singing45
Chapter IV
The devil's delusion of the Sufis in the matter of emotion61
Chapter V
The way wherein the devil deludes many of the Sufis in associating with the young71
Chapter VI
The punishment which follows gazing on the beardless89
account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in their profession of "Reliance," their rejection of means and carelessness of wealth90
Chapter VII
The devil's delusion of the Sufis in refusing medicine101
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of neglecting the Friday prayer and public prayer and substituting privacy and isolation102
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matters of self-abasement hanging down the head and maintenance of prestige104
Chapter VIII
The way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of celibacy, travel'and wandering109
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of travel and wandering112
Account of the way wherein he deludes them in the matter of entering the desert without provision114
Series of illegal acts committed by the Sufis in the course of their travels and wanderings119
The same story is told from another channel, the cheif variety being that Abu Hamzah is called al-Khurasan119
The same story is repeated from another channel125
Chapter IX
The way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis when they return from a journey139
Account of the mode wherein the devil deludes them when a death occurs140
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the people in the matter of burying books and throwing them into the water142
Account of the way whe.ein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of abandoning the pursuit of knowledge143
Chapter X
The way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in their views on knowledge147
Chapter XI
Account of various reprehensive actions recorded of Sufis163
Sample Page


Talbis Iblis: Delusion of The Devil (Set of 2 Volumes)

Item Code:
NAH498
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2011
Publisher:
ISBN:
8171513220
Language:
English
Size:
8.5 inch x 5.5 inch
Pages:
450
Other Details:
Weight of the Book: 560 gms
Price:
$35.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Talbis Iblis: Delusion of The Devil (Set of 2 Volumes)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 1494 times since 11th Oct, 2014
About The Book

Jamal al-Din Abu'I-Faraj 'Abd al-Rahman b. Ali, popularly known as Ibn al- Jauzi, 510 A.H.--- 599 A.H. (A.D. 1116 – A.D.1200), was the author of a vast number of work theological, historical, biographical, medical, philological, and entertaining of which several have been printed in recent times. He was famous as a preacher and the traveller Ibn Jubair gives an enthusiastic account of two of his sermons heard in Baghdad.

The work of which a translations is here offered is directed against the sins of contemporary society, which it traces to "delusion by the Devil." Its title (Talbis lblis) of which those words are a rendering, had been previously selected by Ghazali for a work of similar scope which he contemplated. Ibn Jauzi, though he handles Ghazali severely, adopted it by far the greater part of the book is criticism or censure of the Sufis, who, owing to the establishment of Orders by Ibn al-Rifa'i and 'Abd ai-Qadir al-Gilani in the sixth century of Islam, were beginning to render them, especially in North Africa, a political factor.

About The Author

Jamal al-Din Abu'l-Faraj 'Abd al-Rahman b. Ali, popularly known as Ibn al-Jauzi, 510 A.H.--- 599 A.H. (A.D. 1116-A.D.1200), was the author of a vast number of works-theological, historical, biographical, medical, philological, and entertaining-of which several have been printed in recent times. He was famous as a preacher and the traveller Ibn Jubair gives an enthusiastic account of two of his sermons heard in Baghdad.

We learn from this notice that he was court-preacher, and indeed devoted some of his eloquence to eulogy of the Caliph and the imperial household; which seems inconsistent with his repeated warnings to the learned against association with princes. His father, he tells us, died when he was very young, and his mother paid him no attention. Nevertheless he was brought up in luxury, so that his first attempts at abstinence produced an illness as this interfered with his devotions, he returned to a less ascetic diet, From his earliest years, he had a passion for the acquisition of knowledge, all departments of which he aspired to master. He claims to have read more than 20,000 volumes, Ibn Khallikan calls him the most learned man of his time. Specimens of his homities are to be found in his collection of Miscellanies, called al-Mudhish. Ibn Jubair's account of their effectiveness bears out what the author records on the subject. He was instrumental in bringing more than 200,000 Muslims to repentance and converting more than 200 members of other communities to Islam. On one occasion he found himself preaching to a congregation of more than 10,000 persons, all of whom had either softened hearts or weeping eyes.

Preface

The God has committed the balance of justice to the hands of the intelligent, and sent Apostles to promise reward and give warning of punishment; has revealed unto them the Books which explain wrong and right has established Codes that are perfect without fault or flaw. I praise Him as one who knows that he is the Causer of causes, and I attest His Unity, as one who is sincere in his intent and undoubting; and I testify that Muhammad is His Servant and His Envoy, sent at a time when infidelity had let down its evil over the face of faith, so that he cleared away darkness by the light of guidance, and revealed to him, and elucidating the difficulties of the Book: "leaving them on the white highroad, wherein is no pitfall and no mirage."

God be gracious unto him and all his households and Companions, and their successors, favouring them until the Day of Judgment and Reckoning: and may he give them perfect peace. The greatest benefit conferred on man is Reason, since that is the instrument whereby he acquires knowledge of God Almighty, and the else whereby he arrives at belief in the Apostles, Only in as much as it is insufficient for all that is required of a man, Apostles were sent and Books revealed. So the Code is like the sun, and the reason like the eye, which, if sound, when it is opened, sees the sun. When the veracious sayings of the Prophets are assured to the reason by the evidence of miracles, is surrenders to those Prophets, and relies of them for what is hidden from itself.

When God bestowed reason on the human world, he commenced with the prophethood of Adam; he kept instructing them according to God's inspiration, and they went right till Cain followed his selfish passion and slew his brother. Thereupon different passions swayed mankind, which sent them astray in the wilds of error, so that they worshipped idols and adopted divers beliefs and courses of action, disagreeing therein with the Prophets and their own reasons, and following their lusts, inclining to their customs and imitating their magnates.

The Devil was confirmed in his opinion of them, and they followed him, all but a party of Believers. You are to know that the prophets furnished adequate instruction, and met the ailments with certain remedies; they agreed in pursuing an invariable course. Satan proceeded to mingle doubts with the instruction, and poison with the medicine: misleading tracks with the plain road. Nor did he cease playing with their intellects so that they worshipped idols in the Sacred House, tabooed the sa'ibah, bahirah, wasilah, and ham, approved of burying girls alive deprived them of inheritance, with other forms of error suggested to them by the Devil. Then God Almighty sent Muhammad, who abolished the atrocities, and enjoined what was profitable. His Companions walked with him and after him in the illumination of his light, immune from transgression and its deceit. Only when the light of their existence was withdrawn the clouds of darkness came on. Passions once more generated innovations, narrowing a path, which had always been wide; most people became schismatic and sectarian.

The Devil proceeded to delude and beguile, to separate and combine. He can only play the robber in the night of ignorance; were the mourn of knowledge to break on him, he would be discredited. I thought, it may duty to warn against his wiles, and point out his traps, since to indicate a danger involves warning against falling into it. Now the two Sahih contain the following Tradition recorded by Hudhaifah people used to ask the Prophet about the good, whereas I would ask him about the bad, fearing lest it should overtake me. And indeed we have been informed by Abu'l-Barakat Sa'd Allah b. 'Ali al-Bazzar by a chain of authorities leading up to Ibn 'Abbas that the latter said. By Allah may thinks there is no-one on the earth's surface whose death would give greater pleasure to Satan than mine,-He was asked. How so? He replied: He starts an innovation in East or West, and someone brings it to me. When it gets to me, I confute it with the Sunnah, and it is returned to him as he issued it.

Contents (Volume-I)

Prefaceix
Chapter I
Let him hide himself without God's veil1
Chapter II
The way wherein the devil deludes those who believe in Miracles, wrought for the glory of saints23
The way wherein the devil deludes the Vulgar52
Chapter III
The way wherein the devil deludes the believers in "Shrines"57
The way wherein he deludes the Idolaters59
The commencement of his deluding the Idolaters59
The way wherein he deludes the fire-worshippers69
The way wherein he deludes the Arab pagans71
The way wherein he deludes the deniers of prophecy73
The devil put into the minds of the Brahmins six fallacies74
Chapter IV
The way wherein the devil deludes the dissidents81
Account of the way wherein he deludes the rejectors88
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Batiniyyah95
Account of the cause which led people to involve themselves in this heresy99
Speciments of their doctrines101
Chapter V
The way wherein the devil deludes the Jews and the Christians107
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Christians109
Account of the way wherein he deludes both Jews and Christians110
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Sabians111
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Mazdians112
Account of the way wherein he deludes those who deny the resurrection116
Account of the way wherein he deludes the believers in Transmigration117
Account of the way wherein he deludes our community in their beliefs and religious practices119
Chapter VI
The way wherein the devil deludes Savants in different departments of knowledge127
Account of the way wherein he deludes the Readers of the Qur'an127
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Traditionalists130
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the jurists135
Account of the way in which he deludes them into introducing into their disputation the talk of the philosophers, and into relying on their inventions136
Account of the way wherein he deludes preachers and story-tellers142
Account of the way wherein he deludes philologists and scholars145
Account of the way wherein he deludes the poets147
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the most accomplished scholars148
Chapter VII
The way wherein the devil deludes Governor and Sovereigns153
Chapter VIII
The way wherein the devil deludes Devotees and their devotion157
Account of his delusions in the matter of ablution158
Account of the way v. herein he deludes them in the Call to prayer158
Account of the way wherein he confuses them in prayer159
Account of the way wherein he deludes them over the reading of the Qur'an165
Account of the way wherein he deludes them in the matter of fasting166
Account of the way wherein he deludes them in the matter of pilgrimage168
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the raiders169
Account of the way wherein he deludes many of those among them who have a reputation for virtue171
Chapter IX
The way wherein the devil deludes ascetics and devotees175
Chapter X
The way where devil deludes the Sufis189
Enumeration of the false doctrines which are recorded of a number of them200
Chapter XI
The way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of puri fi cation207
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes them in prayer207
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of dwellings208
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Stlfis in the matter of giving up their property209
Refutation of the above view212
Contents (Volume-II)

Prefacevii
Chapter I
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of their clothing1
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis matters of food and drink11
Specimens of the conduct of the earlier Sufis11
Chapter II
The procedure and indication of the erros which involves in the devils delusion17
Section dealing with traditions which prove the error of their procedure25
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matters of music, dancing, and emotion29
Chapter III
The evidences which show that singing and wailing should he disapproved and forbidden39
Section dealing with the fallacies relied upon by those who permit listening to singing45
Chapter IV
The devil's delusion of the Sufis in the matter of emotion61
Chapter V
The way wherein the devil deludes many of the Sufis in associating with the young71
Chapter VI
The punishment which follows gazing on the beardless89
account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in their profession of "Reliance," their rejection of means and carelessness of wealth90
Chapter VII
The devil's delusion of the Sufis in refusing medicine101
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of neglecting the Friday prayer and public prayer and substituting privacy and isolation102
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matters of self-abasement hanging down the head and maintenance of prestige104
Chapter VIII
The way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of celibacy, travel'and wandering109
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of travel and wandering112
Account of the way wherein he deludes them in the matter of entering the desert without provision114
Series of illegal acts committed by the Sufis in the course of their travels and wanderings119
The same story is told from another channel, the cheif variety being that Abu Hamzah is called al-Khurasan119
The same story is repeated from another channel125
Chapter IX
The way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis when they return from a journey139
Account of the mode wherein the devil deludes them when a death occurs140
Account of the way wherein the devil deludes the people in the matter of burying books and throwing them into the water142
Account of the way whe.ein the devil deludes the Sufis in the matter of abandoning the pursuit of knowledge143
Chapter X
The way wherein the devil deludes the Sufis in their views on knowledge147
Chapter XI
Account of various reprehensive actions recorded of Sufis163
Sample Page


Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

A Novel: Karma
by Nancy Deville
Paperback (Edition: 2010)
Vitasta Publishing Pvt. Ltd
Item Code: NAJ029
$15.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Mind Body and Spirit: A Thrilling Journey to the Ultimate You
by Nancy Deville
Paperback (Edition: 2012)
Vitasta Publishing Pvt. Ltd
Item Code: NAF689
$20.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Tantric Transformation
by Osho
Paperback (Edition: 2007)
Rebel Books
Item Code: IHL018
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Himalayan Village An Account of the Lepchas of Sikkim
by Geoffrey Gorer
Paperback (Edition: 2005)
Pilgrims Publishing
Item Code: IDI849
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
The Mysteries Fasting
by Nabih Amin Faris
Paperback (Edition: 2006)
Kitab Bhawan
Item Code: NAJ426
$8.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Swami Vivekananda (Patriot-Prophet) - An Old and Rare Book
Item Code: NAN901
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
A Hindu-Buddhist Rejoinder (Pope John Paul II on Eastern Religions and Yoga)
by Ram Swarup
Paperback (Edition: 1995)
Voice of India
Item Code: NAF345
$6.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Buddhist Art in India and Sri Lanka
by Virender Kumar Dabral
Hardcover (Edition: 2000)
D. K. Printworld
Item Code: IDD152
$40.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Tibetan Folk Tales
by A. L. Shelton
Paperback (Edition: 2004)
Pilgrims Publishing Varanasi
Item Code: IDI021
$18.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Freedom and Future
Item Code: NAL697
$15.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Anthology of Vedic Hymns (A Collection of Hymns from Four Vedas)
by Svami Bhumanand Sarasvati
Hardcover (Edition: 1984)
Ram Lal Kapoor Trust
Item Code: NAJ370
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
365 Jataka Tales and Other Stories
Item Code: NAC442
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now

Testimonials

Today Lord SIVA arrived well in Munich. Thank you for the save packing. Everything fine. Hari Om
Hermann, Munchen
Thank you very much for keeping such an exotic collection of Books. Keep going strong Exotic India!!!
Shweta, Germany
I am very thankful to you for keeping such rare and quality books, DVDs, and CDs of classical music and even Dhrupad which is almost unbelievable. I hope you continue to be this good in your helpfulness. I have found books about rare cultural heritage such as Kodava samaj, Dhrupad and other DVDs and CDs in addition to the beautiful sarees I have from your business, actually business is not the right word, but for lack of a word I am using this.
Prashanti, USA
Shiva Shankar brass statue arrived yesterday. It´s very perfect and beautiful and it was very carefully packed. THANK YOU!!! OM NAMAH SHIVAYA
Mª Rosário Costa, Portugal
I have purchased many books from your company. Your packaging is excellent, service is great and attention is prompt. Please maintain this quality for this order also!
Raghavan, USA
My order arrived today with plenty of time to spare. Everything is gorgeous, packing excellent.
Vana, Australia
I was pleased to chance upon your site last year though the name threw me at first! I have ordered several books on Indian theatre and performance, which I haven't found elsewhere (including Amazon) or were unbelievably exorbitantly priced first editions etc. I appreciate how well you pack the books in your distinctive protective packaging for international and domestic mailing (for I order books for India delivery as well) and the speed with which my order is delivered, well within the indicated time. Good work!
Chitra, United Kingdom
The statue has arrived today. It so beautiful, lots of details. I am very happy and will order from you shop again.
Ekaterina, Canada.
I love your company and have been buying a variety of wonderful items from you for many years! Keep up the good work!
Phyllis, USA
The Lakshmi statue arrived today and it is beautiful. Thank you so much for all of your help. I am thrilled and she is an amazing statue for my living room.
Susanna, West Hollywood, CA.
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2017 © Exotic India