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Books > Hindu > THE NARADA-PURANA: 5 Volumes
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THE NARADA-PURANA: 5 Volumes
THE NARADA-PURANA: 5 Volumes
Description

Preface

 

Part I

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

The present volume like all other volumes is encyclopedic in character. It deals with miscellaneous topics such as religion philosophy Veda and its ancillaries Siksa, Kalpa, Vyakarana, Nirukta, Chandas and Jyotisa. In siksa it describes the rules of pronunciation of Vedic and classical Sanskrit and the rules regarding music. In Kalpa it deals with the Naksatra, Veda, Samhita, Angirasa and Santi Kalpas. In Vyakarna it gives a general idea of the subject. In Chandas it prescribes rules for Sanskrit and Prakrtra, Vedic and classical metres by the method of Prastara. In Jyotisa it explains the essentials in detail. While dealing with the Puranas it describes the contents of the Puranas which help us to ascertain the interpolations of the later period. Among the general topics it describes Vratas and Tirthas in details and exhaustively.

In the sectarian grouping of the Puranas the Narada Purana is classified as a Vaisnava Purana on the basis of the fact that among the deities glorified in this Purana, Visnu holds the supreme position, though laudatory references to other deities siva, Sakti, etc. are also made. In his obvious partiality for Vaisnavism Narada gives special treatment to Radha and Krsna even prescribes a hymn of 1000 names in their eulogy and proclaims special importance of Ekadasi Vrata in honor of Visnu. He is the first to mention Rama Krsna Nrsimha and other incarnations in connection with Tantric practices.

The variety of topics is very interesting but it is marred as sometimes it is couched in expression that needs elucidation a task which could not be accomplished by a more translation. Hence a provision has been made for the notes which are attached to each chapter separately and not put at the foot of a page as has been the practice hitherto. We hope the reader will not feel embarrassed by this shift.

The translation is based on the Sanskrit text of the Narada Purana published by Messrs Ksemaraja, Srikrsnadasa, Venkatesvara press, Bombay this text constructed on the collation of mss and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti granthas is fairly accurate.

We have included abbreviation in this part. They will be repeated in the succeeding parts too with such additions as are made in the notes of those parts. The General index will be appended to the last part.

 

Introduction

The term Purana though variously derived originally meant old and was used as an adjective in the Rgveda. It developed the connotation something handed down from old times a collection of old legends by the time of the Atharvaveda wherein it is used as a noun. Its use in the singular number in the sence of a tract of literature consisting of some ancient traditional lore in the AV testifies to the extistence of some collection of legends or an Ur-Purana in the days of the AV. The institution of sacrifice needed some such collection of legends for narration on certain days during the course of a sacrifice of long duration is clear from the prescription in the Satapatha Brahmana which calls upon the reciter to assert that the Purana is the veda and recite it.

That there was such an Ur-Purana in ancient times has been endorsed by Puranas in their mythological way. States the Naradiyas Purana.

There was only one Purana every Kalpa. It was one hundred crores in extent and that purana was the source of all sastras.

God Brahma remembered Purana before all other sastras. It is after that all the Vedas proceeded from his mouths Puranas was only one at the beginning.

As the mention of Purana in the sg. No. in AV is corroborated by the traditional belief in Puranas in the existence of one single Ur-Purana this tradition need not be regarded as purely imaginary though the mythical origin of Puranas is fictitious.

But the Puranas accept the theory of the human authorship and the compilation of the first Purana is attributed to Krsna Dvaipayana the arranger who is creadited to have compiled this Puranas from the floating mass of orally transmitted legends tales or anecodotes gnomic or Subhasita like verses and description of the Kalpa epochs. If as is traditionally believed this compiler be the same sage who arranged the scattered traditional mantras into Vedic Samhitas he is located on a sober datation to the middle of the 10th cent. B.C.

The V.P informs us that Vyasa taught this Purana compilation to a disciple who could thrill audience with his narration. As the Purana was to be recited during the leisure period of sacrifical sessions Romaharsana must have tried to make it interesting with additions modifications etc. it thus became a revised and enlarged edition of Vyasa’s Purana and this came to be looked upon as an independent Purana. Romaharsana taught it to his disciples out of whom Akrtavrana of Kasyapa gotra Savarni of Somadatta élan and Susarma of Samsapayana gotra composed their own Purana samhitas.

Thus the Purana Samhita of Vyasa Proliferated into four samhitas that o Romaharasana which through his son Ugrasravas continued independently and the three ones revised by this three disciples mentioned above. The four Samhitas were the basic ones Purva Samhita or Mula Samhita or adi prans the Vayu tells us that all these Samhitas consisted of four parts they dealt with the same subject matter but were distinguished from one another in readings. All of them consisted of 4000 verses except that of Susaram which consisted of 8600 verses.

These original Puranas are not now extant but their authors Romaharsana Savarni Kasyapeya and Samsapayana are the interlocutors in various Puranas.

What could have been the contents of the Mula Puranas is anybody’s guess. But as Puranas served the needs of sacrificial ritual, the then cycles of legends to be recited on Pariplana days as laid down in the Sat. Br. Asvaldayana Srasta sutra may be regarded as the topics therein. They are as follows:

1. King Manu Vaivasvata and his subjects (human Beings).
2. King Yama Vaivasvata and his people (pitrs).
3. King Varuna Aditya and his subjects the Gandharvas.
4. King Soma Vaisnava and his subjects the Apsaras
5. King Arbuda Kadraveya and his subjects the serpents.
6. King Kubera Vaisravana and his subjects the Raksasas.
7. King Asita Dhanva and his subjects the Asuras.
8. King Matsya Sammada and his people the water dwellers.
9. King Tarksya Vaipasyata (or Vaipascia) and his subjects the birds.
10. King Dharma Indra and his subjects the gods

To these may be added the ancient Vedic legends forming the background of the Added the ancient Suktas cosmological hymns like the Naradiya Sukta and similar statements in ancient works like the AV. XI.7.28, XV.6.10-11 eulogistic or patron composed by bards in honor of the royal sacrificer or patron leading to descriptions of the heroic exploits conquests donations granted by royal families Pargiter rightly concludes that the original Purana dealt with ancient traditions about gods rsis kings their genealogies and famous deeds.

These topics later developed in the famous five characteristics of Puranas viz. original creation re-creation after deluge genealogy, Mavantaras and accounts of dynasties of kings and sages. But pargiter’s presumption that the Ur-Purana had all the characteristics of later Puranas is not adequately substantiated and hence not acceptable.

What may be the period of the proliferation of the Ur-Purana in four Mula Puranas? Even if Ugrasravas Savarni and others are regarded as the direct disciples of Romaharsana whom Vyasa taught his Purana Samhita for the establishment of four different traditions of these Puranas from Vyasa would be necessary. If the normally acceptable date of Vyasa is 950 B.C. the Mula-Purana may be assigned to Circa 850 B.C as the probable date of their recognition as independent Mula-Purana. The use of Puranami in the Taittriya Aranyaka II-10 in manu III 232 and Yaj. III. 189 indicate that the number of Puranas then was 3 or more VP’s statement of being based on Mula Puranas shows that these existed at least upto the 3rd cent A.D.

 

Preface

 

Part II

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

The present volume like all other volumes is encyclopedic in character. It deals with miscellaneous topics such as religion philosophy Veda and its ancillaries Etymology of Vedic words, Grammar Mathematics and Astronomy Horoscoy and Natural astrology and prosody. In Cosmogony it describes the process of creation of the Universe. In cosmogony it describes the process of creation of the Universe. In Religion and ethics it places emphasis on the performance of duties of one’s own profession in relation to one’s stage of life. In etymology it gives the derivation of Vedic words. In Grammar it presents a general idea of the subject. In prosody it prescribes rules for the metre by the method of Prastara. In Jyotisa it explains the essentials in details. In occult science it prescribes ritual for attaining particular ends. In spirituality it provides a discourse on meditation gives an exposition of dharmas leading to liberation narrates the story of Bharata and contains the dialogue between suka and Janaka as well as Suka and Sanat Kumara on detachment renunciation and kindred ways of life which bring emancipation to the seeker in this very existence.

In the sectarian grouping of the Puranas the Narada Purana is classified as a Vaisnava Purana on the basis of the fact that among the deities glorified in this Purana, Visnu holds the supreme position, though laudatory references to other deities siva, Sakti, etc. are also made. In his obvious partiality for Vaisnavism Narada gives special treatment to Radha and Krsna even prescribes a hymn of 1000 names in their eulogy and proclaims special importance of Ekadasi Vrata in honor of Visnu. He is the first to mention Rama Krsna Nrsimha and other incarnations in connection with Tantric practices.

The variety of topics is very interesting but it is marred as sometimes it is couched in expression that needs elucidation a task which could not be accomplished by a more translation. Hence a provision has been made for the notes which are attached to each chapter separately and not put at the foot of a page as has been the practice hitherto. We hope the reader will not feel embarrassed by this shift.

The translation is based on the Sanskrit text of the Narada Purana published by Messrs Ksemaraja, Srikrsnadasa, Venkatesvara press, Bombay this text constructed on the collation of mss and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti granthas is fairly accurate.

We have included abbreviation in this part. They will be repeated in the succeeding parts too with such additions as are made in the notes of those parts. The General index will be appended to the last part. The glossary and the general Index to the complete Purana will be appended to the last part. For introduction to this Purana the reader is referred to Part I of this book

 

Preface

 

Part III

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

This Vol. as the analysis of contents would show deals exclusively with the Tantric Ritual connected with the worship of deities. It presents in an elaborate way the method of worship of the deity, particularly the mantra, Nyasa, metre, sage, mudra, dhyana, etc in relation to worship. Though the deity to be worshipped is pasupati emphasis is placed on the worship of his saktis the different manifestations of his power such as Tara Kali, Bhairavi, lalita Bhuvanesvari, Durga, Sarasvati Savitri and mahalaksmi. The aspirant can undertake this worship both for the material and spiritual ends.

The present translation is based on the Sanskrit text of the Narada Purana as published by Messrs Ksemaraja Sri Krsnadasa Venkatesvara press Bombay. This text constructed on the collation of manuscripts and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti granths is fairly accurate.

For the general information about this purana the reader is asked to consult Dr. G.V. Tagare’s Scholarly introduction prefixed to Part I of this Purana. For the difficulties faced by the learned translator of the present part the reader is referred to his note in the preliminary portion which also contains preface abbreviations contents and their analysis.

 

Preface

 

Part IV

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

This Vol. as the contents would show is historically very important as it records the detailed of each Mahapurana as it stood before the final redaction of the present NP. Though as many as sixteen chapters deal with this subject the problem remains the same inasmuch as they do not cover all the contents of all the Puranas and at the same time the information regarding interlocutors is also at variance with the published editions of these Puranas. Here is scope for further research.

Besides recording information on the contents of the Purans this vol. presents the detailed exposition of Vratas tithi wise. The exposition covers as many as sixteen chapters of the fourth Pada and thirty seven chapters of the Uttarabhaga are devoted to the glory and greatness of Ekadasi vrata that falls on the 11th day of the bright half and the dark half of each and every month. These chapters narrate a story in a very interesting way how Yama the god of death had to close his office as all men being compelled to observe Ekadasi by Rukmangada went straight way to heaven how Yama approached brahma and requested him to lure king Rukmangada to drop Ekadasi vrata Brahma agree hit upon a plan produced an enchantress to carry out the plan and how the enchantrees Mohini had finally failed. The section emphasizes the efficacy of ekadasi vrata which continues to be popular among the Vaisnavas even today.

The present translation is based on the Sanskrit text of the Narada Purana as published by Messrs Ksemaraja Sri Krsnadasa Venkatesvara press Bombay. This text constructed on the collation of manuscripts and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti granths is fairly accurate.

For the general information about this purana the reader is asked to consult Dr. G.V. Tagare’s Scholarly introduction prefixed to Part I of this Purana. The Preliminaries prefixed to the present Part include preface, abbreviations and contents. The glossary and Index will follow this part and be suffixed to Part V which competes the Purana.

 

Preface

 

Part V

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

The present volume as the contents would show deals primarily with the description of sacred rivers mountains cities and centres. The subject of Vrata in the context of Ekadasi was treated in the previous part of this Purana which records how Mohini was created by Brahma at the instance of Yama lord of hells how she married king Rukamgada and persuaded him to sop the observance of Ekadasi by the people of his kingdom how she failed in her mission wrought tragedy in her family was rebuked by her family priest Vasu and after admonition coverted to Vaisnavism. The present part contains Vasu’s discourse on religious topics concerning ablution in and worship of Ganga river and the procedure of charitable gifts such as jaggery cow. It includes glorification of Gaya and its seven chains of hillocks praise of Varanasi and worship of lingas thereat. It describes Purusottama ksetra and Panca tirtha one would find herein the panca ratra system of worship of Purusottama and a fully developed stage of Radha cult. There is a graphic description and the mind’s ulimate absorption into the non dual supreme entity. One gets a complete portrait of Kurusksetra and its seven forests of Gangadvara of Kamaksa both as a Sakta pitha and a siddhi pitha Puskara and setu (Ramesvaram). Vasu disclosed the glory of Linga worship merits of Pilgrimage to Tirthas the secret of vrndavana the playground for lord Srikrsna’s amorous sports with the gopis. The Purana places emphasis on the merit of Linga worship and of devotion to Visnu. Thus it brings about a fruitful compromise between Saivism and vaisnavism.

This English translation is based on the sankrit text of the Narada Purana as published by messrs Ksemaraja Sri Krsnadasa venkatesvara, Press, Bombay. This text constructed on the collation of manuscripts and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti and other granthas is fairly accurate.

For general information about this Purana the reader is referred to Dr. G.V. Tagare’s scholarly introduction prefixed to Part I of this Purana. The preliminaries prefixed to the present part include preface, abbreviation and contents. A general Index of the complete Purana has been added to the part.

 

CONTENTS

PART - I
Trans By: Dr. G.V. Tagare

 

A. ABBREVIATIONS xiii
B. INTRODUCTION 1-56
  I. The Naradiya Purana and its Place in the Evolution of the Purana Literature. 1
    i. The Ur-Purana 1
    ii. The Mula Puranas 2
    iii. Puranam Panca-Laksanam 5
    iv. Dharma-Sastra and Puranas 6
    v. Dharmasastra in the Narada Purana 7
    vi. The Purana in Modern Indian Languages. 8
  II. The Naradiya as a Mahapurana 9
    1. Sarga (Creation) 11
    2. Pratisarga (Re-creation after dissolution) 13
    3. Vamsa (Genealogies) 13
    4. Manvantara (Ages of Manus) 16
    5. Vamsanucaritam (History of Royal Dynastics) 18
  III. The Sources of the Naradiya and its Probable Date 18
  IV. The Vedangas in the Narada Purana 24
    1. Siksa 24
    2. Kalpa 27
    3. Vyakarana 28
    4. Nirukta 28
    5. Jyotisa 29
    6. Chandas 30
  V. The Narada Purana and Tantrism 30
    1. Tantra 31
    2. Mantra 32
    3. Yantra 37
  VI. Religious Sects in the Narada Purana 42
    1. Pancaratras and Vaisnavism 43
    2. Saivism 44
    3. Saktism 45
  VII. Religion and Philosophy in the Narada Purana 48
    1. Castes and stages in life 48
    2. Cosmogony 49
    3. Yoga and its Kinds 49
  VIII. The Interpretations of Bhagavata and Bhagavata 52
  IX. The Dharma Sastra 52
  X. The Narada Purana and the Mahapuranas 53
  XI. The Author 54
  XII. Concluding Remarks 55
C. TRANSLATION AND NOTES  

 

PART I

 

CHAPTERS  
1. Dialogue between Suta and Sages 57
2. Eulogy of Lord Visnu 75
3. Description of the Sphere of the Earth and of Bharata 89
4. Anecdote of Markandeya 102
5. Description of Markandeya's Life 114
6. Glory of the Ganga river 126
7. Glory of the Ganga river (contd.) 142
8. Glory of the Ganga river (contd.) 152
9. Glory of the Ganga river (contd.) 166
10. Defeat of Devas by Bali 181
11. Glory of the Ganga: Origin of the river. 188
12. Dialogue between god Dharma and King Bhagiratha 210
13. Discourse on Dharma 220
14. Directions Regarding Dharma and Propitiatory rites 238
15. Bhagiratha advised to bring the Ganga 255
16. Bhagiratha brings down the Ganga 271
17. Narration of the vowed Observance of Dvadasi day 283
18. Holy Observance pertaining to Laksmi-Narayana 296
19. Installation of the Banner 300
20. The Legend of King Sumati 307
21. The holy rite of Five Nights 316
22. Fast for a month 320
23. Ekadasi Vrata 324
24. Conduct of the Good and Approved usages 334
25. Vedic Studies and Other Religious Duties 340
26. Dharma of the Householder 347
27. Religious Duties of the Householders, Forest Hermits and Sannyasins 355
28. Rite of Sraddha 370
29. Determination of Lunar days 382
30. Mode of Expiation 391
31. Duties of the Emmissaries of Yama 404
32. Forest of Worldly Existence 412
33. A Discourse on Yoga 421
34. Characteristics of Devotion to Hari 438
35. Anecdote of Vedamali on Spiritual Knowledge 445
36. Efficacy of Service unto Visnu: Story of Yajnamali and Sumali 452
37. Greatness of Visnu, Story of Gulika, the hunter 458
38. Uttanka's Eulogy of Visnu. Uttanka Liberated 465
39. Greatness of Visnu: Story of Raivata 473
40. Greatness of Visnu: Story of Sudharma 480
41. Glory of the Lord's Name 487
  Illustration: Sarvato-bhadra 294a
 

PART II
Translated By: Ganesh Vasudeo Tagare

 
A. PREFACE vii
B. ABBREVIATIONS xi
C. TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES  
Chapters  
42. Cosmogony: The Origin of the Universe 499
43. Traditional Duties of Brahmanas 514
44. A Discourse on Meditation 534
45. Exposition of Dharmas leading to Liberation 547
46. Narration of Spiritual matters 563
47. Exposition of the way to realize the Soul 576
48. Story of Bharata 585
49. Exposition of the Virtuous Path to Liberation 594
50. Arrangement of notes and syllables 605
51. Treatise on Rituals 636
52. Exposition of Grammar 657
53. Exposition of Nirukta 674
54. Mathematics and Astronomy 691
55. Delineation of Horoscopy 723
56. Natural Astrology 778
57. Description of Prosody 868
58. Suka's Temptation 873
59. Dialogue between Suka and Janaka 880
60. Dialogue between Suka and Sanatkumara 887
61. Greatness of Nivrtti Dharma 898
62. Exposition of Moksa-dharma 907
 

PART III
Translated By: Hemendra Nath Chakravorty

 
A. PREFACE vii
B. TRANSLATOR'S NOTE ix
C. ANALYSIS OF CONTENTS x
D. ABBREVIATIONS xvii
Chapters  
63. Principles of Pasupata Philosophy 915
64. Procedure of Initiation 926
65. Procedure of repeating the mantras 932
66. Daily Prayers and Ritual 941
67. Worship of Devas 955
68. Ganesa Mantra 967
69. Procedure of repeating the Mantras 976
70. Japa of Mahavisnu 990
71. Worship of Nrsimha 1008
72. Worship of Hayagriva 1034
73. Worship of Rama and Others 1034
74. Worship of Hanuman 1051
75. Procedure of showing lamp to Hanuman 1068
76. Glory of Karttavirya 1078
77. Karttavirya-Kavaca 1090
78. Hanumat-Kavaca 1102
79. Life of Hanuman 1107
80. Mantras of Krsna 1136
81. Mantras of Krsna and others 1165
82. A Thousand names of Radha and Krsna 1179
83. The Panca Prakrti Mantra 1199
84. The Mantra of the Goddess 1213
85. Yaksini Mantra 1223
86. Incarnation of Laksmi 1238
87. Mantras of Goddess Durga 1249
88. Mantras of Radha and Others 1263
89. One thousand names of Lalita 1288
90. The narrative of Nitya deities 1303
91. The narrative of the Mantra of Mahesa 1323
 

PART IV
Translated By: Dr. G.V. Tagare

 
A. PREFACE vii
B. ABBREVIATIONS ix
Chapters  
92. The Brahmapurana: Contens and merit accrued 1345
93. The Padma Purana: Contents 1352
94. The Visnu Purana: Contens 1357
95. The Vayu Purana: Contents 1360
96. The Bhagavata Purana: Contents 1362
97. The Naradiya Purana: Contents 1366
98. The Markandeya Purana: Contents 1368
99. The Agni Purana: Contents 1371
100. The Bhavisya Purana: Contents 1374
101. The Brahma-Vaivarta Purana: Contents 1376
102. The Linga Purana: Contents 1379
103. The Varaha Purana: Contents 1382
104. The Skanda Purana: Contents 1384
105. The Vamana Purana: Contents 1405
106. The Kurma Purana: Contents 1408
107. The Matsya Purana: Contents 1410
108. The Garuda Purana: Contents 1413
109. The Brahmanda Purana: Contents 1418
110. The exposition of Vratas to be performed on Pratipad (the first day of the lunar fortnight) 1422
111. Exposition of Vratas to be observed on Dvitiyas (the second day of the lunar fortnight) 1428
112. Enumeration of Vratas to be observed on Trtiyas (the third day of the lunar fortnight) 1431
113. The Exposition of the holy rites to be performed on Caturthis (the fourth day of the lunar fortnight) 1440
114. The Exposition of the Holy Vratas to be performed on Pancami days (the fifth day of the lunar fortnight) 1449
115. The Exposition of the holy vows to be observed on Sasthi (the sixth day in the lunar fortnight) 1456
116. The Exposition of the rites to be observed on Saptami (the seventh day) 1462
117. The Review of the Vratas to be observed on Astami (the eight day of the lunar fortnight) 1469
118. The Exposition of the Vratas to be observed on Navami (the ninth day of the lunar fortnight) 1480
119. The Holy rites to be observed on Dasami (the tenth day of the lunar fortnight) 1483
120. The Exposition of the Vratas to be observed on Ekadasi (the eleventh day of the lunar fortnight) 1491
121. The Holy rites to be observed on Dvadasi (the twelfth day of the lunar fortnight) 1501
122. The Vratas to be observed on Trayodasi (the thirteenth day of the lunar fortnight) 1512
123. The Vratas to be observed on Caturdasi (The fourteenth day of the lunar fortnight) 1521
124. The Exposition of Vratas to be observed on the Full Moon and the New Moon Days 1529
125. The greatness of the Purana 1539
 

UTTARABHAGA

 
Chapters  
1. The greatness of Ekadasi day 1546
2. Discussion of Tithis 1548
3. Yama goes to the Region of Brahma 1554
4. An Appeal by Yama 1560
5. The lamentation of Yama 1563
6. God Brahma's Reply 1565
7. The Statement of Brahma 1567
8. The description of Mount Mandara 1574
9. A Dialogue between Rukmangada and Dharmangada 1577
10. The dialogue between Rukmangada and Harsadeva 1582
11. Rukmangada meets Mohini 1588
12. Stipulation of the Conditions 1593
13. The Fascination of Mohini 1596
14. The salvation of Godha (the Lizard) 1599
15. The dialogue between the father (Rukmangada) and the son (Dharmangada) 1605
16. The Anecdote of a chaste lady 1610
17. The Statement of Mohini 1617
18. Honouring the Mothers 1622
19. The love-making of Mohini 1627
20. Dharmangada's conquer of quarters 1631
21. Dharmangada's marriages and his order as a Ruler 1634
22. The glory of the month of Karttika 1638
23. Mohini's dialogue with Rukmangada 1647
24. Questions of Mohini 1656
25. The story of Mohini 1662
26. The story of Mohini (continued) 1670
27. The story of Kasthila 1671
28. Kasthila's story (continued) 1685
29. The description of Kasi 1693
30. The story of Kasthila (continued) 1701
31. The glory of the month of Magha 1708
32. The Narration of Sandhyavali 1713
33. The Submission of Dharmangada 1720
34. The Vision of the Lord 1726
35. Mohini incurs a Curse 1728
36. Brahma intercedes for Mohini 1736
37. Mohini regains her physical body 1742
 

PART V
Translated By: Ganesh Vasudeo Tagare

 
A. PREFACE vii
B. ABBREVIATIONS ix
Chapters  
38. The Greatness of the Ganga 1747
39. The Glory of Ablution in the Ganga 1753
40. The Fruit of Ablution in Different Holy Centres 1757
41. The Procedure for Charitable Gifts 1763
42. The Procedure for the Gift of Guda-dhenu 1770
43. The Procedure of Worship of the Ganga 1774
44. The Greatness of Gaya 1787
45. The Procedure of offering Pindas in the Gaya-Yatra 1797
46. Importance of offering Pindas at Gaya 1808
47. The Glory of Gaya 1814
48. The Greatness of Kasi 1824
49. Pilgrimage to Kasi 1833
50. The Glory of Kasi 1839
51. The Greatness of Kasi (concluded) 1846
52. The Greatness of Purusottama (Jagannatha of Puri) 1846
53. The Greatness of Purusottama (contd.) 1859
54. The Glory of Purusottama (contd.) 1865
55. The Greatness of Purusottama (contd.) 1876
56. The Greatness of Purusottama (contd.) 1876
57. The Glory of Purusottama: The Procedure of Worship 1896
58. The Creation of the Golden Egg 1902
59. Purusottama Mahatmyam (Contd.) 1909
60. Ablution of Deity 1913
61. The Fruit of Pilgrimage to Purusottama Ksetra 1920
62. The Greatness of Prayaga; the Procedure of Pilgrimage 1929
63. The Greatness of Prayaga (concluded) 1935
64. The Greatness of Kuruksetra 1952
65. Pilgrimage to Kuruksetra 1956
66. Glory of Gangadvara (or Haridvara) 1969
67. The Greatness of Badarikasrama 1975
68. The Legend of Kamada 1983
69. The Greatness of Kamaksa 1985
70. The Greatness of Prabhasa 1989
71. The Greatness of Puskara 1998
72. The Power of Austerities of Gautama 2004
73. The Greatness of Tryambakesvara 2008
74. The Glory of Gokarna 2024
75. The Greatness of Laksmanacala 2028
76. The Greatness of Setu 2035
77. Sancitity of the Tirthas in Narmada 2037
78. The Glory of Avanti 2040
79. The Greatness of Mathura 2045
80. The Glory of Vrndavana 2050
81. The Review of the Story of Vasu 2061
82. The Benefit of Listening to the Narada Purana 2066
  INDEX, general 2073

 

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THE NARADA-PURANA: 5 Volumes

Item Code:
IDE885
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
2008
ISBN:
Part I - 8120803477; Part II - 8120803485; Part III - 8120803493; Part IV - 8120803507; Part V - 8120803515
Language:
English Translation
Size:
8.7" X 5.7"
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2170
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Preface

 

Part I

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

The present volume like all other volumes is encyclopedic in character. It deals with miscellaneous topics such as religion philosophy Veda and its ancillaries Siksa, Kalpa, Vyakarana, Nirukta, Chandas and Jyotisa. In siksa it describes the rules of pronunciation of Vedic and classical Sanskrit and the rules regarding music. In Kalpa it deals with the Naksatra, Veda, Samhita, Angirasa and Santi Kalpas. In Vyakarna it gives a general idea of the subject. In Chandas it prescribes rules for Sanskrit and Prakrtra, Vedic and classical metres by the method of Prastara. In Jyotisa it explains the essentials in detail. While dealing with the Puranas it describes the contents of the Puranas which help us to ascertain the interpolations of the later period. Among the general topics it describes Vratas and Tirthas in details and exhaustively.

In the sectarian grouping of the Puranas the Narada Purana is classified as a Vaisnava Purana on the basis of the fact that among the deities glorified in this Purana, Visnu holds the supreme position, though laudatory references to other deities siva, Sakti, etc. are also made. In his obvious partiality for Vaisnavism Narada gives special treatment to Radha and Krsna even prescribes a hymn of 1000 names in their eulogy and proclaims special importance of Ekadasi Vrata in honor of Visnu. He is the first to mention Rama Krsna Nrsimha and other incarnations in connection with Tantric practices.

The variety of topics is very interesting but it is marred as sometimes it is couched in expression that needs elucidation a task which could not be accomplished by a more translation. Hence a provision has been made for the notes which are attached to each chapter separately and not put at the foot of a page as has been the practice hitherto. We hope the reader will not feel embarrassed by this shift.

The translation is based on the Sanskrit text of the Narada Purana published by Messrs Ksemaraja, Srikrsnadasa, Venkatesvara press, Bombay this text constructed on the collation of mss and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti granthas is fairly accurate.

We have included abbreviation in this part. They will be repeated in the succeeding parts too with such additions as are made in the notes of those parts. The General index will be appended to the last part.

 

Introduction

The term Purana though variously derived originally meant old and was used as an adjective in the Rgveda. It developed the connotation something handed down from old times a collection of old legends by the time of the Atharvaveda wherein it is used as a noun. Its use in the singular number in the sence of a tract of literature consisting of some ancient traditional lore in the AV testifies to the extistence of some collection of legends or an Ur-Purana in the days of the AV. The institution of sacrifice needed some such collection of legends for narration on certain days during the course of a sacrifice of long duration is clear from the prescription in the Satapatha Brahmana which calls upon the reciter to assert that the Purana is the veda and recite it.

That there was such an Ur-Purana in ancient times has been endorsed by Puranas in their mythological way. States the Naradiyas Purana.

There was only one Purana every Kalpa. It was one hundred crores in extent and that purana was the source of all sastras.

God Brahma remembered Purana before all other sastras. It is after that all the Vedas proceeded from his mouths Puranas was only one at the beginning.

As the mention of Purana in the sg. No. in AV is corroborated by the traditional belief in Puranas in the existence of one single Ur-Purana this tradition need not be regarded as purely imaginary though the mythical origin of Puranas is fictitious.

But the Puranas accept the theory of the human authorship and the compilation of the first Purana is attributed to Krsna Dvaipayana the arranger who is creadited to have compiled this Puranas from the floating mass of orally transmitted legends tales or anecodotes gnomic or Subhasita like verses and description of the Kalpa epochs. If as is traditionally believed this compiler be the same sage who arranged the scattered traditional mantras into Vedic Samhitas he is located on a sober datation to the middle of the 10th cent. B.C.

The V.P informs us that Vyasa taught this Purana compilation to a disciple who could thrill audience with his narration. As the Purana was to be recited during the leisure period of sacrifical sessions Romaharsana must have tried to make it interesting with additions modifications etc. it thus became a revised and enlarged edition of Vyasa’s Purana and this came to be looked upon as an independent Purana. Romaharsana taught it to his disciples out of whom Akrtavrana of Kasyapa gotra Savarni of Somadatta élan and Susarma of Samsapayana gotra composed their own Purana samhitas.

Thus the Purana Samhita of Vyasa Proliferated into four samhitas that o Romaharasana which through his son Ugrasravas continued independently and the three ones revised by this three disciples mentioned above. The four Samhitas were the basic ones Purva Samhita or Mula Samhita or adi prans the Vayu tells us that all these Samhitas consisted of four parts they dealt with the same subject matter but were distinguished from one another in readings. All of them consisted of 4000 verses except that of Susaram which consisted of 8600 verses.

These original Puranas are not now extant but their authors Romaharsana Savarni Kasyapeya and Samsapayana are the interlocutors in various Puranas.

What could have been the contents of the Mula Puranas is anybody’s guess. But as Puranas served the needs of sacrificial ritual, the then cycles of legends to be recited on Pariplana days as laid down in the Sat. Br. Asvaldayana Srasta sutra may be regarded as the topics therein. They are as follows:

1. King Manu Vaivasvata and his subjects (human Beings).
2. King Yama Vaivasvata and his people (pitrs).
3. King Varuna Aditya and his subjects the Gandharvas.
4. King Soma Vaisnava and his subjects the Apsaras
5. King Arbuda Kadraveya and his subjects the serpents.
6. King Kubera Vaisravana and his subjects the Raksasas.
7. King Asita Dhanva and his subjects the Asuras.
8. King Matsya Sammada and his people the water dwellers.
9. King Tarksya Vaipasyata (or Vaipascia) and his subjects the birds.
10. King Dharma Indra and his subjects the gods

To these may be added the ancient Vedic legends forming the background of the Added the ancient Suktas cosmological hymns like the Naradiya Sukta and similar statements in ancient works like the AV. XI.7.28, XV.6.10-11 eulogistic or patron composed by bards in honor of the royal sacrificer or patron leading to descriptions of the heroic exploits conquests donations granted by royal families Pargiter rightly concludes that the original Purana dealt with ancient traditions about gods rsis kings their genealogies and famous deeds.

These topics later developed in the famous five characteristics of Puranas viz. original creation re-creation after deluge genealogy, Mavantaras and accounts of dynasties of kings and sages. But pargiter’s presumption that the Ur-Purana had all the characteristics of later Puranas is not adequately substantiated and hence not acceptable.

What may be the period of the proliferation of the Ur-Purana in four Mula Puranas? Even if Ugrasravas Savarni and others are regarded as the direct disciples of Romaharsana whom Vyasa taught his Purana Samhita for the establishment of four different traditions of these Puranas from Vyasa would be necessary. If the normally acceptable date of Vyasa is 950 B.C. the Mula-Purana may be assigned to Circa 850 B.C as the probable date of their recognition as independent Mula-Purana. The use of Puranami in the Taittriya Aranyaka II-10 in manu III 232 and Yaj. III. 189 indicate that the number of Puranas then was 3 or more VP’s statement of being based on Mula Puranas shows that these existed at least upto the 3rd cent A.D.

 

Preface

 

Part II

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

The present volume like all other volumes is encyclopedic in character. It deals with miscellaneous topics such as religion philosophy Veda and its ancillaries Etymology of Vedic words, Grammar Mathematics and Astronomy Horoscoy and Natural astrology and prosody. In Cosmogony it describes the process of creation of the Universe. In cosmogony it describes the process of creation of the Universe. In Religion and ethics it places emphasis on the performance of duties of one’s own profession in relation to one’s stage of life. In etymology it gives the derivation of Vedic words. In Grammar it presents a general idea of the subject. In prosody it prescribes rules for the metre by the method of Prastara. In Jyotisa it explains the essentials in details. In occult science it prescribes ritual for attaining particular ends. In spirituality it provides a discourse on meditation gives an exposition of dharmas leading to liberation narrates the story of Bharata and contains the dialogue between suka and Janaka as well as Suka and Sanat Kumara on detachment renunciation and kindred ways of life which bring emancipation to the seeker in this very existence.

In the sectarian grouping of the Puranas the Narada Purana is classified as a Vaisnava Purana on the basis of the fact that among the deities glorified in this Purana, Visnu holds the supreme position, though laudatory references to other deities siva, Sakti, etc. are also made. In his obvious partiality for Vaisnavism Narada gives special treatment to Radha and Krsna even prescribes a hymn of 1000 names in their eulogy and proclaims special importance of Ekadasi Vrata in honor of Visnu. He is the first to mention Rama Krsna Nrsimha and other incarnations in connection with Tantric practices.

The variety of topics is very interesting but it is marred as sometimes it is couched in expression that needs elucidation a task which could not be accomplished by a more translation. Hence a provision has been made for the notes which are attached to each chapter separately and not put at the foot of a page as has been the practice hitherto. We hope the reader will not feel embarrassed by this shift.

The translation is based on the Sanskrit text of the Narada Purana published by Messrs Ksemaraja, Srikrsnadasa, Venkatesvara press, Bombay this text constructed on the collation of mss and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti granthas is fairly accurate.

We have included abbreviation in this part. They will be repeated in the succeeding parts too with such additions as are made in the notes of those parts. The General index will be appended to the last part. The glossary and the general Index to the complete Purana will be appended to the last part. For introduction to this Purana the reader is referred to Part I of this book

 

Preface

 

Part III

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

This Vol. as the analysis of contents would show deals exclusively with the Tantric Ritual connected with the worship of deities. It presents in an elaborate way the method of worship of the deity, particularly the mantra, Nyasa, metre, sage, mudra, dhyana, etc in relation to worship. Though the deity to be worshipped is pasupati emphasis is placed on the worship of his saktis the different manifestations of his power such as Tara Kali, Bhairavi, lalita Bhuvanesvari, Durga, Sarasvati Savitri and mahalaksmi. The aspirant can undertake this worship both for the material and spiritual ends.

The present translation is based on the Sanskrit text of the Narada Purana as published by Messrs Ksemaraja Sri Krsnadasa Venkatesvara press Bombay. This text constructed on the collation of manuscripts and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti granths is fairly accurate.

For the general information about this purana the reader is asked to consult Dr. G.V. Tagare’s Scholarly introduction prefixed to Part I of this Purana. For the difficulties faced by the learned translator of the present part the reader is referred to his note in the preliminary portion which also contains preface abbreviations contents and their analysis.

 

Preface

 

Part IV

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

This Vol. as the contents would show is historically very important as it records the detailed of each Mahapurana as it stood before the final redaction of the present NP. Though as many as sixteen chapters deal with this subject the problem remains the same inasmuch as they do not cover all the contents of all the Puranas and at the same time the information regarding interlocutors is also at variance with the published editions of these Puranas. Here is scope for further research.

Besides recording information on the contents of the Purans this vol. presents the detailed exposition of Vratas tithi wise. The exposition covers as many as sixteen chapters of the fourth Pada and thirty seven chapters of the Uttarabhaga are devoted to the glory and greatness of Ekadasi vrata that falls on the 11th day of the bright half and the dark half of each and every month. These chapters narrate a story in a very interesting way how Yama the god of death had to close his office as all men being compelled to observe Ekadasi by Rukmangada went straight way to heaven how Yama approached brahma and requested him to lure king Rukmangada to drop Ekadasi vrata Brahma agree hit upon a plan produced an enchantress to carry out the plan and how the enchantrees Mohini had finally failed. The section emphasizes the efficacy of ekadasi vrata which continues to be popular among the Vaisnavas even today.

The present translation is based on the Sanskrit text of the Narada Purana as published by Messrs Ksemaraja Sri Krsnadasa Venkatesvara press Bombay. This text constructed on the collation of manuscripts and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti granths is fairly accurate.

For the general information about this purana the reader is asked to consult Dr. G.V. Tagare’s Scholarly introduction prefixed to Part I of this Purana. The Preliminaries prefixed to the present Part include preface, abbreviations and contents. The glossary and Index will follow this part and be suffixed to Part V which competes the Purana.

 

Preface

 

Part V

The present volume contains the Narada Purana, Part I (Chapters 1-38) completing the first-two sections (Prakriya and Anuanga) of the text in English Translation. This is the Twenty-second volume in the series which we have planned on Ancient Indian Tradition and Mythology.

The project of the Series was envisaged and financed in 1970 by Lab Sundar Lal Jam of Messrs Motilal Banarsidass. Hitherto twenty one volumes of the Series (comprising English translation of Siva, Linga, Bhagavata, Garuda, Narada and Kurma Puranas) have been published and released for sale.

The present volume as the contents would show deals primarily with the description of sacred rivers mountains cities and centres. The subject of Vrata in the context of Ekadasi was treated in the previous part of this Purana which records how Mohini was created by Brahma at the instance of Yama lord of hells how she married king Rukamgada and persuaded him to sop the observance of Ekadasi by the people of his kingdom how she failed in her mission wrought tragedy in her family was rebuked by her family priest Vasu and after admonition coverted to Vaisnavism. The present part contains Vasu’s discourse on religious topics concerning ablution in and worship of Ganga river and the procedure of charitable gifts such as jaggery cow. It includes glorification of Gaya and its seven chains of hillocks praise of Varanasi and worship of lingas thereat. It describes Purusottama ksetra and Panca tirtha one would find herein the panca ratra system of worship of Purusottama and a fully developed stage of Radha cult. There is a graphic description and the mind’s ulimate absorption into the non dual supreme entity. One gets a complete portrait of Kurusksetra and its seven forests of Gangadvara of Kamaksa both as a Sakta pitha and a siddhi pitha Puskara and setu (Ramesvaram). Vasu disclosed the glory of Linga worship merits of Pilgrimage to Tirthas the secret of vrndavana the playground for lord Srikrsna’s amorous sports with the gopis. The Purana places emphasis on the merit of Linga worship and of devotion to Visnu. Thus it brings about a fruitful compromise between Saivism and vaisnavism.

This English translation is based on the sankrit text of the Narada Purana as published by messrs Ksemaraja Sri Krsnadasa venkatesvara, Press, Bombay. This text constructed on the collation of manuscripts and supported by the evidence of citations found in the smrti and other granthas is fairly accurate.

For general information about this Purana the reader is referred to Dr. G.V. Tagare’s scholarly introduction prefixed to Part I of this Purana. The preliminaries prefixed to the present part include preface, abbreviation and contents. A general Index of the complete Purana has been added to the part.

 

CONTENTS

PART - I
Trans By: Dr. G.V. Tagare

 

A. ABBREVIATIONS xiii
B. INTRODUCTION 1-56
  I. The Naradiya Purana and its Place in the Evolution of the Purana Literature. 1
    i. The Ur-Purana 1
    ii. The Mula Puranas 2
    iii. Puranam Panca-Laksanam 5
    iv. Dharma-Sastra and Puranas 6
    v. Dharmasastra in the Narada Purana 7
    vi. The Purana in Modern Indian Languages. 8
  II. The Naradiya as a Mahapurana 9
    1. Sarga (Creation) 11
    2. Pratisarga (Re-creation after dissolution) 13
    3. Vamsa (Genealogies) 13
    4. Manvantara (Ages of Manus) 16
    5. Vamsanucaritam (History of Royal Dynastics) 18
  III. The Sources of the Naradiya and its Probable Date 18
  IV. The Vedangas in the Narada Purana 24
    1. Siksa 24
    2. Kalpa 27
    3. Vyakarana 28
    4. Nirukta 28
    5. Jyotisa 29
    6. Chandas 30
  V. The Narada Purana and Tantrism 30
    1. Tantra 31
    2. Mantra 32
    3. Yantra 37
  VI. Religious Sects in the Narada Purana 42
    1. Pancaratras and Vaisnavism 43
    2. Saivism 44
    3. Saktism 45
  VII. Religion and Philosophy in the Narada Purana 48
    1. Castes and stages in life 48
    2. Cosmogony 49
    3. Yoga and its Kinds 49
  VIII. The Interpretations of Bhagavata and Bhagavata 52
  IX. The Dharma Sastra 52
  X. The Narada Purana and the Mahapuranas 53
  XI. The Author 54
  XII. Concluding Remarks 55
C. TRANSLATION AND NOTES  

 

PART I

 

CHAPTERS  
1. Dialogue between Suta and Sages 57
2. Eulogy of Lord Visnu 75
3. Description of the Sphere of the Earth and of Bharata 89
4. Anecdote of Markandeya 102
5. Description of Markandeya's Life 114
6. Glory of the Ganga river 126
7. Glory of the Ganga river (contd.) 142
8. Glory of the Ganga river (contd.) 152
9. Glory of the Ganga river (contd.) 166
10. Defeat of Devas by Bali 181
11. Glory of the Ganga: Origin of the river. 188
12. Dialogue between god Dharma and King Bhagiratha 210
13. Discourse on Dharma 220
14. Directions Regarding Dharma and Propitiatory rites 238
15. Bhagiratha advised to bring the Ganga 255
16. Bhagiratha brings down the Ganga 271
17. Narration of the vowed Observance of Dvadasi day 283
18. Holy Observance pertaining to Laksmi-Narayana 296
19. Installation of the Banner 300
20. The Legend of King Sumati 307
21. The holy rite of Five Nights 316
22. Fast for a month 320
23. Ekadasi Vrata 324
24. Conduct of the Good and Approved usages 334
25. Vedic Studies and Other Religious Duties 340
26. Dharma of the Householder 347
27. Religious Duties of the Householders, Forest Hermits and Sannyasins 355
28. Rite of Sraddha 370
29. Determination of Lunar days 382
30. Mode of Expiation 391
31. Duties of the Emmissaries of Yama 404
32. Forest of Worldly Existence 412
33. A Discourse on Yoga 421
34. Characteristics of Devotion to Hari 438
35. Anecdote of Vedamali on Spiritual Knowledge 445
36. Efficacy of Service unto Visnu: Story of Yajnamali and Sumali 452
37. Greatness of Visnu, Story of Gulika, the hunter 458
38. Uttanka's Eulogy of Visnu. Uttanka Liberated 465
39. Greatness of Visnu: Story of Raivata 473
40. Greatness of Visnu: Story of Sudharma 480
41. Glory of the Lord's Name 487
  Illustration: Sarvato-bhadra 294a
 

PART II
Translated By: Ganesh Vasudeo Tagare

 
A. PREFACE vii
B. ABBREVIATIONS xi
C. TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES  
Chapters  
42. Cosmogony: The Origin of the Universe 499
43. Traditional Duties of Brahmanas 514
44. A Discourse on Meditation 534
45. Exposition of Dharmas leading to Liberation 547
46. Narration of Spiritual matters 563
47. Exposition of the way to realize the Soul 576
48. Story of Bharata 585
49. Exposition of the Virtuous Path to Liberation 594
50. Arrangement of notes and syllables 605
51. Treatise on Rituals 636
52. Exposition of Grammar 657
53. Exposition of Nirukta 674
54. Mathematics and Astronomy 691
55. Delineation of Horoscopy 723
56. Natural Astrology 778
57. Description of Prosody 868
58. Suka's Temptation 873
59. Dialogue between Suka and Janaka 880
60. Dialogue between Suka and Sanatkumara 887
61. Greatness of Nivrtti Dharma 898
62. Exposition of Moksa-dharma 907
 

PART III
Translated By: Hemendra Nath Chakravorty

 
A. PREFACE vii
B. TRANSLATOR'S NOTE ix
C. ANALYSIS OF CONTENTS x
D. ABBREVIATIONS xvii
Chapters  
63. Principles of Pasupata Philosophy 915
64. Procedure of Initiation 926
65. Procedure of repeating the mantras 932
66. Daily Prayers and Ritual 941
67. Worship of Devas 955
68. Ganesa Mantra 967
69. Procedure of repeating the Mantras 976
70. Japa of Mahavisnu 990
71. Worship of Nrsimha 1008
72. Worship of Hayagriva 1034
73. Worship of Rama and Others 1034
74. Worship of Hanuman 1051
75. Procedure of showing lamp to Hanuman 1068
76. Glory of Karttavirya 1078
77. Karttavirya-Kavaca 1090
78. Hanumat-Kavaca 1102
79. Life of Hanuman 1107
80. Mantras of Krsna 1136
81. Mantras of Krsna and others 1165
82. A Thousand names of Radha and Krsna 1179
83. The Panca Prakrti Mantra 1199
84. The Mantra of the Goddess 1213
85. Yaksini Mantra 1223
86. Incarnation of Laksmi 1238
87. Mantras of Goddess Durga 1249
88. Mantras of Radha and Others 1263
89. One thousand names of Lalita 1288
90. The narrative of Nitya deities 1303
91. The narrative of the Mantra of Mahesa 1323
 

PART IV
Translated By: Dr. G.V. Tagare

 
A. PREFACE vii
B. ABBREVIATIONS ix
Chapters  
92. The Brahmapurana: Contens and merit accrued 1345
93. The Padma Purana: Contents 1352
94. The Visnu Purana: Contens 1357
95. The Vayu Purana: Contents 1360
96. The Bhagavata Purana: Contents 1362
97. The Naradiya Purana: Contents 1366
98. The Markandeya Purana: Contents 1368
99. The Agni Purana: Contents 1371
100. The Bhavisya Purana: Contents 1374
101. The Brahma-Vaivarta Purana: Contents 1376
102. The Linga Purana: Contents 1379
103. The Varaha Purana: Contents 1382
104. The Skanda Purana: Contents 1384
105. The Vamana Purana: Contents 1405
106. The Kurma Purana: Contents 1408
107. The Matsya Purana: Contents 1410
108. The Garuda Purana: Contents 1413
109. The Brahmanda Purana: Contents 1418
110. The exposition of Vratas to be performed on Pratipad (the first day of the lunar fortnight) 1422
111. Exposition of Vratas to be observed on Dvitiyas (the second day of the lunar fortnight) 1428
112. Enumeration of Vratas to be observed on Trtiyas (the third day of the lunar fortnight) 1431
113. The Exposition of the holy rites to be performed on Caturthis (the fourth day of the lunar fortnight) 1440
114. The Exposition of the Holy Vratas to be performed on Pancami days (the fifth day of the lunar fortnight) 1449
115. The Exposition of the holy vows to be observed on Sasthi (the sixth day in the lunar fortnight) 1456
116. The Exposition of the rites to be observed on Saptami (the seventh day) 1462
117. The Review of the Vratas to be observed on Astami (the eight day of the lunar fortnight) 1469
118. The Exposition of the Vratas to be observed on Navami (the ninth day of the lunar fortnight) 1480
119. The Holy rites to be observed on Dasami (the tenth day of the lunar fortnight) 1483
120. The Exposition of the Vratas to be observed on Ekadasi (the eleventh day of the lunar fortnight) 1491
121. The Holy rites to be observed on Dvadasi (the twelfth day of the lunar fortnight) 1501
122. The Vratas to be observed on Trayodasi (the thirteenth day of the lunar fortnight) 1512
123. The Vratas to be observed on Caturdasi (The fourteenth day of the lunar fortnight) 1521
124. The Exposition of Vratas to be observed on the Full Moon and the New Moon Days 1529
125. The greatness of the Purana 1539
 

UTTARABHAGA

 
Chapters  
1. The greatness of Ekadasi day 1546
2. Discussion of Tithis 1548
3. Yama goes to the Region of Brahma 1554
4. An Appeal by Yama 1560
5. The lamentation of Yama 1563
6. God Brahma's Reply 1565
7. The Statement of Brahma 1567
8. The description of Mount Mandara 1574
9. A Dialogue between Rukmangada and Dharmangada 1577
10. The dialogue between Rukmangada and Harsadeva 1582
11. Rukmangada meets Mohini 1588
12. Stipulation of the Conditions 1593
13. The Fascination of Mohini 1596
14. The salvation of Godha (the Lizard) 1599
15. The dialogue between the father (Rukmangada) and the son (Dharmangada) 1605
16. The Anecdote of a chaste lady 1610
17. The Statement of Mohini 1617
18. Honouring the Mothers 1622
19. The love-making of Mohini 1627
20. Dharmangada's conquer of quarters 1631
21. Dharmangada's marriages and his order as a Ruler 1634
22. The glory of the month of Karttika 1638
23. Mohini's dialogue with Rukmangada 1647
24. Questions of Mohini 1656
25. The story of Mohini 1662
26. The story of Mohini (continued) 1670
27. The story of Kasthila 1671
28. Kasthila's story (continued) 1685
29. The description of Kasi 1693
30. The story of Kasthila (continued) 1701
31. The glory of the month of Magha 1708
32. The Narration of Sandhyavali 1713
33. The Submission of Dharmangada 1720
34. The Vision of the Lord 1726
35. Mohini incurs a Curse 1728
36. Brahma intercedes for Mohini 1736
37. Mohini regains her physical body 1742
 

PART V
Translated By: Ganesh Vasudeo Tagare

 
A. PREFACE vii
B. ABBREVIATIONS ix
Chapters  
38. The Greatness of the Ganga 1747
39. The Glory of Ablution in the Ganga 1753
40. The Fruit of Ablution in Different Holy Centres 1757
41. The Procedure for Charitable Gifts 1763
42. The Procedure for the Gift of Guda-dhenu 1770
43. The Procedure of Worship of the Ganga 1774
44. The Greatness of Gaya 1787
45. The Procedure of offering Pindas in the Gaya-Yatra 1797
46. Importance of offering Pindas at Gaya 1808
47. The Glory of Gaya 1814
48. The Greatness of Kasi 1824
49. Pilgrimage to Kasi 1833
50. The Glory of Kasi 1839
51. The Greatness of Kasi (concluded) 1846
52. The Greatness of Purusottama (Jagannatha of Puri) 1846
53. The Greatness of Purusottama (contd.) 1859
54. The Glory of Purusottama (contd.) 1865
55. The Greatness of Purusottama (contd.) 1876
56. The Greatness of Purusottama (contd.) 1876
57. The Glory of Purusottama: The Procedure of Worship 1896
58. The Creation of the Golden Egg 1902
59. Purusottama Mahatmyam (Contd.) 1909
60. Ablution of Deity 1913
61. The Fruit of Pilgrimage to Purusottama Ksetra 1920
62. The Greatness of Prayaga; the Procedure of Pilgrimage 1929
63. The Greatness of Prayaga (concluded) 1935
64. The Greatness of Kuruksetra 1952
65. Pilgrimage to Kuruksetra 1956
66. Glory of Gangadvara (or Haridvara) 1969
67. The Greatness of Badarikasrama 1975
68. The Legend of Kamada 1983
69. The Greatness of Kamaksa 1985
70. The Greatness of Prabhasa 1989
71. The Greatness of Puskara 1998
72. The Power of Austerities of Gautama 2004
73. The Greatness of Tryambakesvara 2008
74. The Glory of Gokarna 2024
75. The Greatness of Laksmanacala 2028
76. The Greatness of Setu 2035
77. Sancitity of the Tirthas in Narmada 2037
78. The Glory of Avanti 2040
79. The Greatness of Mathura 2045
80. The Glory of Vrndavana 2050
81. The Review of the Story of Vasu 2061
82. The Benefit of Listening to the Narada Purana 2066
  INDEX, general 2073

 

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