Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
Share
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Your Cart (0)
Books > Tantra > Pauskara Samhita (In Two Volumes): A Rare Book - Sanskrit Text with English Translation
Displaying 1140 of 1313         Previous  |  NextSubscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Pauskara Samhita (In Two Volumes): A Rare Book - Sanskrit Text with English Translation
Pauskara Samhita (In Two Volumes): A Rare Book - Sanskrit Text with English Translation
Description
Foreword

In the Fourth Meeting of the Publication committee of Rashtriya Sanskrit Samsthan held on the fifth June 1976 at New Delhi, it was resolved that materials from the three Agamas-Vaikhanasa, Pancaratra and Saiva-should be collected and placed before the Publication Committee for compiling the Agama Kosa.

In early 1968 when I joined the Tirupati Vidyapeetha as Reader and Head of the Research and Publication wing, I observed that the material extracted from Pancaratra Samhitas for the Agama-Kosa, contained dubious readings and consequently the critical editions of the important text have to be undertaken by that wing. Dr. B.R. Sharma, the then Director suggested that critical editions of the Visvamitra-, and Pauskar-Samhitas might be brought out by the Research wing. The last mentioned Samhita was assigned to Dr last mentioned Samhita was assigned to Dr. P. P. Apte (the then Lecturer in the wing). Its publication was approved in a meeting of a publication committee 3-2-1986.

That in view of the importance of the Pauskar-Samhita in the Pancaratra-Canon, Critical edition of the text is a pressing need, was candidly admitted by H. Daniel SMITH in an article entitled, “The three gems of the Pancaratra-Canon-an appraisal” published in Vol I, Part I of the Vimars’a (pp. 45-51) of the K.S. Vidyapeetha (Tirupati 1972).

The Pauskar-Samhita (hereafter abbreviated to PS) contains about 5900 slokas, divided into 43 chapters, and it runs as a dialogue between Pauskara and Bhagawan on the technique of marshalling the Mandala designs and their significance in the first 26 chapters.

In this edition, Dr. APTE has utilized two Mss of PS-one from India office Library London and the other Supplied to him by Asuri Srinivas Ayyengar, who after entering into the Sanyasa-order is now known as HH Sri Yatiraja Sampatkumar Ramanjua Muni of Melkote.

The affiliation of the Pauskara-Paramesvara to Srirangam temple in the south, is obviously known from the Jayakhya (12cd) citation.

Satvatm Yadusailendre
Srirange Pauskaram tatha l

To put it particularly, the worship of Hari is carried out in accordance with Satvata-Isvara in Melkote, Pauskara-Parameshvara in Srirangam and Jayakhya-Padma in Kanchi.

Dr. Apte is specially qualified to undertake the responsibility of ending the PS because of his qualifications, training and experience, He obtained a doctorate degree in the Pancaratra, from the university of Poona, worked for about three years in the Agama Kosa wing of the Tirupati Vidyapeetha as Lecturer and attended several Agama conferences organized by the illustrations sage of Kanci at several temple centres in Kanci and other centres in Andhra Pradesh.

I trust the text of PS with its simple translation will go a long way to whet the appetite of students of temple religion in general and Vaisnavism in particular.

Introduction

An attempt has been made to reconstruct the scheme of 25 Mandalas described in ‘Pauskara Samihita’ of the Pancaratra Agama. ‘Pauskara Samhita’ is one of the three main canonical ‘samhita’ texts of the Pancaratra doctrine-a Vaisnavite religious sect in India. The three classical Samhitas of the Pancaratra Agama are: Sattvata Samhita, Pauskara Samhita and Jayakhya Samhita, and these texts date back to 3rd to 5th Century A.D.

Though mandala worship is described and mentioned in all three texts, it happens to be the central theme of ‘Pauskara Samhita’ – which describes in great details the technical construction of the mandalas to be drawn for the purpose of ‘Mandalaradhana’ (Mandala worship) as part of the initiation and progress of the spiritual aspirant seeking admission to the cult, with the final aim of attainment of Moksa.

The Pancaratra religious sect is still one of the important religious sects in the South India, however, the elaborate procedure of ‘Mandalaradhana’ as an independent institution as described in Pauskara Samhita has been relegated to the background in the course of centuries and forgotten.

The present reconstruction of Pauskara Samhita mandalas with the help of original textual description represents an important addition to the literature regarding ‘Mandala’ worship, as the date of Pauskara Samhita makes them among the oldest mandalas in the world.

MANDALARADHANA
IN PANCARATR AGAMA

India has been a land of cultural interactions and integrations. The heritage of the Vedic tradition was supplemented by Tantric and local traditions in the religio-cultural field of social life, in addition to the influences of Buddhism and Jainism etc. the Moksa-dharmaparvan of the ‘Mahabharata’ has stored encyclopaedic information on various religious sects Saiva, Pancaratra, Pasupata etc. the Pancaratra docrine believing in one and only God ‘Visnu’ and instructing the Satvata mode of worship has occupied an important place in this parvan being allotted a separate Narayaniya section for this cult variously named as Ekantidharma or the Sattvata or Bhagavatavidhi. The Gita verses ‘Imam Vivasvate yogam’.. (4.1-7) apparently refer to this Ekantidharma tradition. This tradition seems to have developed into the temple-oriented phase of the Pancaratra in the post-Mahabharata period. An integrated scheme of worship called ‘Catuh-sthana-arcana’ came to be accepted in the temple religion. This scheme includes in addition to the image worship invocation and worship in Kumbha (water-pot), Mandala (mystic diagram), and Kunda (fire-pit).

Mandalas are said to be mystic diagrams-mystic in the sense they are used in a mystic way or for a mystic purpose often connected with tantrism. The diagrams known as Yantra-Cakra-Bhadra etc. form an allotropy of mystic symbolisms of which Mandala is one.

The Mandala worship is found prescribed in all the three classical samhitas of the Pancaratra Agama: Sattvata, Pauskara and Jayakhya of 3rd to 5th Century A D That the worship of God with the aid of mystic diagrams was incorporated in the Pancaratra ritualism from its earliest phase is evidenced from the canonical text Sattvata Samhita referring to a wheel inscribed with mantras (mantra-cakra) in 2:12. It explains further a form of worship in the mandala diagrams (Mandlaradhana). It is quite likely that this practice was adopted in the Pancaratra religion from tantric tradition. But soon after adoption in the Pancaratra family, it has been fully and finally Vaisnavised and has developed and maintained its personality as such with sectarian characteristics all along.

The scheme of Mandalas happens to be the central theme of the Pauskara Samhita. The temple institution having a very firm footing in the South India owes allegiance to the classical Samhitas of admittedly, northern origin especially in Kashmir.

The Vaisnavism apparently remodeled the tantric elements of Mantras, Mandalas and Mudras to suit their inherent tenets and practices. The Pauskara Samhita reflects the clarity of vision of the Pancaratra seers evolving the scientific and elaborate scheme of Mandalaradhana which might be said to be a prototype of Alayaradhana or the temple-worship later on incorporating and preserving the mandala-worship along with the Agni and Kumbha worships under the ‘Catusthanarcana’ curriculum of rituals.

For understanding the topic of Mandalas, the Pauskara Samhita (PS-c. 300-400 (A D) which is next in authority to Sattvata Samhita (SS) is extremely important, since it elaborates the technical aspect of these diagrams and serves as a source book for later Pancaratra religion, on the subject of Mandalaradhana-Jayakhya Samhita (JS) the third canonical text also gives one specimen: Navapadmamandala and the rest of the Samhitas post classical and later ones describe one or more such diagrams. The Pauskara Samhita is of special value because here one gets a detailed scheme of sketching, designing and colouring of the Mandalas.

The place of Mandala worship in the historical Pan-caratra religion especially the temple cult in South India is as an important component of the fourfold worship offered to God who is invoked in image, pitcher, mandala and fire (Bimba, Kumbha, Mandala and Agni). From PS, however, it appears that the Mandala worship, in those davs was not a part of the temple ritual only, but often maintained its independent existence like the sacrificial institution. And for that ritual known as Yaga, a special pandal was erected on a site chosen on a mountain or in a forest or by the side of a hermitage or on the bank of a river or inside temple premises (PS 2.4.5.). The formal purpose of the Mandalaradhana is the initiation and progress of the spiritual aspirant seeking admission to the cult and the final goal is obviously the attainment of Moksa. PS (Chapter I) prescribes four main classes of Mandalas: Padmodara or lotus hearted, Aneka-kajagarbha or multi-lotus, Cakrabja or lotus-surrounded-by-circle, and Misracakra or of complex-wheels. These are meant for aspirants passing through various grades of progress: Samayi, Putraka, Sadhaka and Acarya. The aspirant practices some sort of Yogic-cum tantric process of self-restraint with the help of the diagrams aiming at the final liberation. It is assured that the aspirant by entangling himself in these diagrams really frees himself of all bondages. The merit of the Mandalaradhana accrues by even witnessing, worshipping it or meditating upon it. These Yagas continue for a period extending up to forty days or more.

At a later stage, the human tendency to utilize the mysterious powers for personal visible benefit seems to have outweighed the urge for spiritual uplift and the Mandala worship was yoked for mercenary ends as seen from Sriprasna Samhita (52:56-63). The diagrams were sometimes drawn on canvas or wall instead of being drawn on the ground.

The elaborate procedure of ‘Mandalaradhana’ as an independent institution has gradually been relegated to the background in the course of time. The Pauskara Samhita which has been preserved as an article of faith has suffered a lot in faithful preservation as an article of faith has suffered a lot in faithful preservation of the portions dealing with the technical niceties of sketching and colouring of elaborate patterns of complicate geometrical descriptions.

Both the approaches, the grammatical of the Sanskritist or the geometrical of the technologist often fall short in interpreting these passages. All the same persistent efforts by researchers do yield valuable results. It is felt that this chapter of our rich cultural heritage revealed by this interpretative methodology would interest the scholars and designers alike.

Foreword Blessing

We are happy that the second part of Pauskarasamhita (Chs. 27 - 43) is being published, alongwith English translation done by Dr. Prabhakar Pandurang Apte. We are more happy about the revised elegant format of the book placing Sanskrit verses and English translation of the same. It is also praiseworthy that the editor has made much progress over our first Devanagari edition published in 1934. At that time due to numerous Granthapatas which could not be filled in spite of our efforts to collect and collate available palm leaf manuscripts in Grantha character, we had to print the text with gaps. We are happy that the present editor has succeded in filling in hundreds of lacunae on the strength of his deep penetration into content-analysis. He has used square brackets to indicate that the gaps have been filled by him after giving due consideration to contextual content. This kind of labour on the part of the editor is approved by Jayakhya Samhita (c. 450 A.D.) following words: Pranasta-Pathavakyanam Krtva Vastuvicaranam… prayatnat samskaroti vai. We had given our blessings to the publication of first part in 1991. We are happy that the research in Pancaratra started with the publication of Ahirbudhnya samhita critically edited by F. Otto Schrader continues in 1916. We very well know the hardship undergone by the pioneers of Pancaratra research. When Schrader wrote his ‘Introduction to Pancaratra and Ahirbudhnya Samhita’, he was interned as political prisoner in Ahmadnagar Jail. The proofs were being sent to him for correction. The intellectual contribution of that jail was made known to the world only after thirty years when Discovery of India by late Pandit Jawaharlal Nahru was written there. When we had written a letter to Schrader, making some querries about Pancaratra research, he had written to us that he was leading miserable days at the fag end of the life. We felt sad to read the line that it was difficult for him to get food even once in two days. We have personally witnessed the hardships experienced by our Guruji, H.H. Yadugiri Yatiraja Ramanuja muni, for our Pauskara samhita in Devanagari, we had to purchase Nagari fonts from Nirnayasagar press, Bombay and train the compositors to use them in Madras press. We had also purchased tradle machine and operated it in Yatiraj Math, Madras and spread the papers to dry them on the floor. We are including this account in our foreward so that the computer generation should know the evolution and growth of printing technology in Sanskrit publications.

We appreciate the efforts put in by the editor and translator as well as publishers in bringing out this valued publication. In the first part sketching, colouring and mode of worship of Mandala diagrams was special contribution. In the second part Vaisnava Sraddha procedure supplemented by deep philosophical layers, the Pavitrarohana ritual, the scientific philosophical layers, the Pavitrarohana ritual, the scientific philosophical basis of Tirthaksetras and Tirthayatras, the significance of various endowments: Vidyapitha Pratisthana etc. and the role of Sthapati in temple building and renovation activity are special contributions. The editor has done fair justice to these topics in his translation. Our blessings to both editor and publishers.

About the Author

The Author who holds a masters degree in Sanskrit and law and a doctorate in Agamas, is specially qualified to edit the text, in view of his qualifications, training and experience in the field of his specialization-i.e., Agamashastra. He has worked for three years in the Agama Kosha wing of the Tirupati Vidyapeetha. He has not only attended several Agama conferences, and national and international conferences but also presented several original papers on various aspects of Agamas. He has to his credit several research papers published in renowned Indological journals. He holds at present the position of Editor of the Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Sanskrit on Historical Principles of the Deccan College, Pune.

From Part II

Foreword

It is a matter of great pride and privilege that the Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeetha, Tirupati is going to bring out the Volume – II of “Pauskara Samhita” with the help of the editorial craftsmanship of Prof. Prabhakar Pandurang Apte as well as the constant efforts of the Research and Publication Department of our University. The first Volume of “Pauskara Samhita” was published by the Vidyapeetha in the year 1991 and the same has been well received by the scholars and Researchers. In fact the wide appreciation of the 1st Volume by the world of scholars has prompted us to bring out the Volume II to cater to the needs of those interested in temple culture, Art technology and various rituals under Pancaratra canon.

It is well known that out of three Agamas, i.e. Vaikhanas, Pancaratra and Saiva; the Pancaratra Agama plays a dominant role particularly in South India, so far as performance of various rituals in the temples of this part of country is concerned. There are three gems of classical Samhitas of the Pancaratra Agama i.e. (i) Sattvata Samhita, (ii) Pauskara Samhita, (iii) Jayakhya Samhita and these texts were composed in between 3rd to 5th century A.D. Pauskara Samhita describes in detail the technical construction and colouring of Mandalas to be designed for the purpose of “Mandalavadhana”; an effective measure for attainment of salvation. Hence, “Pauskara Samhita” is not only considered as an authority on Vaisnavism in terms of performance of various types of rituals in the temples but also as a treatise relating to the unique Art. Technology of ancient India. The authority of the text is evident from the fact that so many propounders and exponents of Vaisnavism including Yatiraja Ramanuja have off-quoted “Pauskara Samhita” to substantiate their views and theories.

Needless to mention that a Puja (worship), if performed as per the procedures laid down in an authentic treatise, is bound to fetch good results and merits for the “Yajaman” and the same helps strengthen the mental and spiritual power by generating an atmosphere of peace and tranquility around us. That is the reason why the Sastras have been considered significant and any deviation from the scriptural prescriptions may be counter-productive. So says Srimad Bhagavad Gita.

Yah: Shastrvidhimutsrjy vartte kamkartah I
N S Sididhimvaproti n such n para gatim II
Tasmachcghhastra praman te karyakaryavyavasithtou I
Jhatva shastrvidhanokta karm kartumiharhsi II

Not only for marshalling the Mandala designs; but also for understanding the underlying spirit and significance of Vaisnava culture of the country, the Sastras like “Pauskara Samhita” are very much essential for the mankind and relevant to the society. Even in the modern era of science and technology the significance of these ancient Sastras, based upon eternal truths and time-tested experiments, can not be ruled out. Hence, there is a dire necessity of exposition, promotion, comprehension and publication of these ancient treatise like “Pauskara Samhta”

May I avail this opportunity to express my deep sense of gratitude to those including Dr. V. Jaddipal, Head of the Department and Prof. Prabhakar Pandurang Apte and others, but for whose intellectual exercise, the concerned volume could not have seen the light of the earth and I hope that the concerned volume will be well-received as the part 1st by the scholars, researchers, readers and others interested in the Vaisnavism.

Contents

PAUSKARA SAMHITA (Translation)
TABLE OF CONTENS
CH. I DISCIPLES’S TEST (vv. 1-54 pp. 1-9)
1Disciple-Teacher Dialogue1-5
2Classification of Mandalas6-15
3Mandala Worship16-25
4Fruit of Mandala Worship26-32
5Initiation and Imparting of Knowledge by the Teacher33-44
6The fate of premature death before completion of worship45-54
CH. II SOIL-TESTING (vv. 1-44½ pp. 10-15 )
S. No Topic Verse No.
1Selection of Site for Mandala Worship1-8
2Merits and defects of the Soil9-16
3Commendable Sites17-20½
4Soil-Tests21-26
5Worship of lord of Sites27-35
6Post worship ritual36-44½
CH III ORIENTATION (vv. 1-96 pp. 16-29)
S No.TopicVerse No.
1Ascertainment of direction with the help of a gnomon1-22
2Zodiac-wise shadow-length23-29
3Fixation and application of the Sanku30-39
4Ditermination of East West and North South40-48
5Preparation of square ground for Vastu Mandala49-58
6Sketching of the Vastu Mandala diagram (9 X 9 = 81)58-96
CH. IV CHARACTERISTICS OF PENDAL FOR MANDALA WORSHIP (vv. 1-277 pp. 30-56)
S. No.TopicVerse No.
1Measurement, Scales1-12
2Measurement of passages13-17
3Schetching of pendal grand17-21
4Pendal walls21-28
5Coating of the walls29-30
6Pendal Doors : height and width31-35
7Door guards36-49
8Door frames50-52
9Windows53-56
10Construction of Columns: shapes57-93
11Enclosure I canopy I shape, color94-102
12Varying height of pendals103-112
13Arches113-130
14Altar-decorations131-134
15Banners-various colours-emblems135-162
16Retinue-deities162-196
17Perfuming the arches196-201
18Fumgation201-207
CH. V. MANDALA DIAGRAMS (vv. 343 pp. 57-148)
S. No. TopicPage No.
1Bhadraka57-58
2Aghanirmocana58-59
3Sadadhva59-60
4Dharmakhya61-62
5Vasagarbha62-64
6Sarvakamaprada64-65
7Amitraghna66-68
8Avusya68-70
9Balabhadra70-74
10Paustika74-78
11Arogyaka78-82
12Viveka82-85
13Vagisa85-88
14Manasa88-93
15Jayakhya93-97
16Svastika97-104
17Ananta104-108
18Nityakhya108-113
19Bhutavasa113-117
20Amogha118-122
21Supratistha122-127
22Buddhyadhara127-132
23Gunakara132-138
24Dhruvakhya138-144
25Paramananda144-148
CH. VI LOTUS DESIGNS (vv. 1-85. pp 149-153)
1Bloomed and badded lotus designs1-12
2Three petals to twenty seven fetals:13-17
3Filaments17-22
4Oval shaped lotus22-23
5Method of drawing lotus design24-29
6Multi petal lotuses30-34
7Shattered petals34-39
8Compact petals40-43
9Unseen part of the petals43-50
10Petal-joints43-50
11Colouring51-61
12Writing of Mantras and worship61-85
Note : As the text is obscure, the contents are para-phrased instead of translating them literally.
CH. VII CHARACTERISTICS OF THE
COMPOSITE DESIGN (vv. 1-173.) (pp 154-158)
1Design patterns according to petals1-22
2Scale and area23-40
3Obscure portions41-173
Note: Since the major part of the chapter is obscure and not suitable for diagrmatic reconstruction the said portions are not amenable for coherent translation.
CH. VIII CHAKRABJA-LAKSHANA
(vv. 1-212) (pp. 159-169)
1Thousand varities of Chakrabja design1-7
2Diagram worship in nine types wheels8-17
3Drawing method of lotuses18-37
4Procedure of worship38-43
5Nine patterns of wheels44-62
6Association of wheels with time divisions months, years etc.63-80
Note : The remaining part 81 and 212 is obscure and hence not amenable for cohuent translation.
CH. IX (CHARACTERISTICS OF MIXED LOTUS-WHEEL DESIGN (vv 1-165) (pp. 170-190)
1Various patterns of mixed wheel-designs1-27
2Area of encircle lotuses28-43
3Designing of circumcircle44-46
4Spokes of the wheel47-51
5Wheels with 1000 spokes52-65
6Complex wheels named Yugachakra66-71
7Devachakra72-77
8Ground area for wheels78-84
9Colour Scheme85-90
10Formation of entrances corridors etc91-95
11Application of Mantras in wheel-worship96-104
12Invocation of Lord Purush and eightfold Prakriti105-109
13Invocation of Vedas110-111
14Importance of Mantras112-119
15Analogy of human body to wheel diagram120-137
16Assignment of Omkar syllable138-140
17Assignment of Lord of Mantras141-145
18Medilation146-165
CH. X COMPOSITE MANDAL DESIGN OF NINE CONSTITUENTS (vv. 1-9) (pp 91-199)
1Nine Prakrtis manifested into fourfold manifestations and five other aspects of Vishnu1-35
2Sketching of the Navatmamandal36-45
3Diagram No. 2-Purvatmamandala etc.46-74
4Completion of the nine motifs75-76
5Colouring of various parts77-94
CH XI VRTABIMBALAKSANA
(vv. 1-12) (pp. 00-201)
1Six parts denoting Six divine attributes1-2
2Corresponding colour application 3-4
3Sketching of various parts5-11
4Drawing of lotus at the centre and worshiping Vasudeva therein12
CH. XII PANCAPADMA-CAKRABIMBA-LAKSANA (vv. 1-28) (pp. 28202-206)
1Five designs in five directions1-3
2Sketching of Pancapadma4-10
3Colouring11-18
4Worship of the Lord of motifs19-22
5Cakrabimba23
CH. XIII SURYABIMBA LAKSANA
(vv. 1-13) (pp. 207-208)
1Sketching and colouring1-10
2Drawing of the rays11
3Drawing of the lotus12
4Fruit of worship13
CH. XIV CANDRABIMBA LAKSANA
(vv. 1-16) (pp. 209-210)
1Sketching1-10
2Colouring11-12
3Worship13-15
4Fruit of worship16
CH. XV TRIKONA-BIMBA-LAKSANA
(vv. 1-35) (pp. 211-215)
1Triangular units1-9
2Mandal-parts10-30
3Colouring31-32
4Assignment of Vedas etc.33
5Worship of Brahman and attainment of Moksa34-35
CH. XVI KURMA-BIMBA-LAKSANA
(vv. 1-48) (pp. 216-218)
1Designing of the sketch of a tortoise in a square1-35
2Mouth portion of the tortoise36-39
3Drawing a lotus40-41
4Colouring42-47
5Worship of Vishnu48
CH. XVII SANKHA-BIMBA-LAKSANA
(vv. 1-45) (pp. 219-223)
1Drawing a square measuring 32X321-10
2The conch design11-40
3Colouring41-45
4Worship of Nrsimh45½
CH. XVIII KALASA-BIMBA-LAKSANA
(vv. 1-62) (pp. 224-230)
1The design of a waterpot in a square measuring 40X401-2
2Various parts of the waterpot10-37
3Mantric ritual38-41
4Lotus-design42-43
5Outer parts of the Mandal44-45
6Colouring46-49
7Worship of Varah50
8General instructions regarding51-58
9Mandal motifs-Fruit of Worship59-62
CH. XIX WORSHIP OF NINE NAVEL DIAGRAM
(vv. -140) (pp. 231-240)
1Purpose of ninenaval worship1-5
2Various fruits of worship6-16
3Further spiritual progress on rebirth17-21
4Final fruit of worship22-23
5Nine motifs in the federal Mandal diagram24-28
6Invocation of the Lord29-47
7Revival of worship in the deserted places48-74
8Ritual of worship of Federal Mandal75-129
9Vishwedeva tarpana130-140
CH. XX WORSHIP OF VISVAKSENA
(vv. 1-121) (pp. 230-266)
1Purpose of Worship1-14
2Diagram for worship15-18
3Ritual of worship19-22
4Meditation of Visvaksena23-38
5Meditation on retinue deities39-51
6Worship of the retinue52
7Prowess of Visvaksena53-57
8Worship of Visvaksena in relation to Vasudev58-82
9Dos and donts requiring naivedya offerings83-121
CH. XXI CHARACTERISTICS OF RETINUE (deities)
(vv. 1.23) (pp. 267-270)
1The names of the prowesses of the goddesses1-7
2Assignment on various parts8-18
3Description of the goddesses19-22
4Worship23
CH. XXII CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SUPPORT
AND THE SEAT (vv. 1-75) (pp. 271-280)
1Description of the seats and supports1-16
2Meditation on principles and elements and attributes17-26
3Assignment of Various principles on various lotus-parts27-47
4Meditation upon Mantrashakti48-61
5Existence of divine power I the structure of Mantras62-75
CH. XXIII ASSIGNMENT OF SEAT-DEITIES
(vv. 1-71) (pp. 281-289)
1Substratum-substrata relationship of diagram and the deity1-7
2The efficacy of the Mantras8-12
3Worship of divine in various seats and supports13-20
4Presence of the Divine in various supports in subtle and grows forms21-27
5Invocation of the divine forms in varions parts of Mandals28-71
CH. XXIV CHARACTERISTICS OF DEITIES OF SUPPORTS AND SEATS (vv. 1-57) (pp. 290-297)
1Assignment of various deities Male & female on various Mandal parts1-38
2Meditation on Sudarshan39-41
3Meditation on the Supreme Lord42-47
4Guard attendents48-57
CH. XXV THE DESCRIPTION OF SUPPORT
(vv. 1-41) (pp. 298-303)
1Code of conduct for rituals1-41
CH. XXVI DETAILS OF THE OFFERINGS
(vv. Vv. 1-60) (pp 01-312)
1Types of food offering1-9
2Other offerings10-25
3General rules about offerings26-40
PAUSKARA SAMHITA – PART II
TABLE OF CONTENTS

(Page Nos. Refer to English Translation)
27Homage to Ancestors370-439
(i) Routine homage ritual370-383
(ii) Occassional homage ritual384-393
(iii) Contingent discussion of mantra-application393-426
(iv) Intentional homage ritual246-238
28Specification of Source of Fire239-243
29Characteristics of Fire Pit444-459
30Mounting of Sacred garland460-481
31People’s Duty:-482-510
(i) Ritual of sleeping and awakening of Lord Visnu during caturmasya: cluster of four months482-486
(ii) Rules for devotees entering Lord’s shrine486-488
(iii) Rules for vows489-490
(iv) Mode of meditation on specific deity during ablution ritual490-493
(v) Ritual in the fire-chamber493-497
(vi) Ritual of par-taking food at conclusion of vow497
(vii) Interpretation of the term anuyaga (subsequent worship)497
(viii) Propitiation of cordial fire at the end of lunch498-499
(ix) Prohibition of donation of oblation to non-devotees499
(x) Collection of popular divine duties500-502
(xi) Lord’s worship according to change of time502-508
(xii) Fruit of varieties of fasts508-509
(xiii) Excellence of merit accruing from dvadasi vow: (twelfth lunar day)509-510
32Decision on Lapse of Worship511-525
(i) Discussion on lapse of worship511-514
(ii) Merit of action subservient to knowledge515-518
(iii) Discussion of domestic worship of images (a) established by ancestors; (b) gifted by preceptor; (c) self-obtained; (d) deposited by someone else; (e) bought on payment; (iv) Discrimination of worship of God’s images;518-520
(iv) Elucidation of righteous path;520-521
(v) Equanimity of merit inspite of differentiation in worship owing to emotional devotion.521-525
33Comprehensive Description of Cosmic Principles526-543
(i) Enumeration of tenets; Worship of images of four manifestations, Merit differentiation of worship of different images.526-534
(ii) Thought on conquest over cosmic tenets534-538
(iii) Voidability and acceptability of set of cosmic tenets539-540
(iv) Comprehension of spirituality etc. of collection of cosmic tenets540-543
34Characteristics of Incense-Burner & Bell544-551
35Characteristics of Incense-Container552-558
(i) Sketching of cakrabja-Mandala552-553
(ii) Characteristics of Incense – Vessel/container553-558
36Contemplation on the Topic of Shrines559-601
(i) Discussion of temples: Mention by name of some shrines established by accomplished persons and meritorious people spiritual progress of inhabitants there to 559-566
(ii) Discussion of spiritual gait of persons born and dead within temple premises566-570
(iii) Pervasion of twenty six cosmic tenets by the divine manifestations: Vasudeva etc570-571
(iv) Indication about emblems and ornaments of aforesaid images.571-583
(v) Indication about the sacred places, congregation of Cosmic Principles583-585
(vi) Lord’s of sacred places585-601
37Contemplation on the topic of Shrines [continued]602-608
(i) Remainder of previous chapter602
(ii) Discussion about placement of objects bearing marks of conch, disc and foot impression of the Lord.602-608
38Elucidation of Eligible Persons609-638
(i) Discussion about eligibility of persons regarding installation: Presence of God on the strength of mantra-s, Ritual of re-installation of images separated by divine presence due to lapse of time609-610
(ii) Definition of the term ‘installation’610-613
(iii) Compromise about admixtural worship613-615
(iv) Ritual of procurement of image615-618
(v) Discussion about defects such as damage accruing to image etc.618-622
(vi) Elaboration of atonement of defect622-624
(vii) Lordly effulgence624
(viii) Mode of meditation of Mandalas: mystic diagrams.624-635
(ix) Narration of time division635-636
(x)Characteristics of doctrine637-638
39Determination of Agamas639-642
40Characteristics of Holy Altar643-653
41Establishment of Various religions establishments/endowments654-672
(i) Ritual of installation of penta-temple-complex654-658
(ii) Definition of the term ‘installation’610-613
(iii) Compromise about admixtural worship613-615
(iv) Ritual of procurement of image615-618
(v) Discussion about defects such as damage accruing to image etc.618-622
(vi) Elaboration of atonement of defect622-624
(vii) Lordly effulgence624
(viii) Mode of meditation on Mandalas: mystic diagrams624-635
(ix) Narration of time division635-636
(x) Characterstics of doctrine637-638
39Determination of Agamas639-642
40Characterstics of Holy Altar643-653
41Establishment of Various religious establishments/endowments654-672
(i) Ritual of installation of penta-temple-complex654-658
42Temple Installation.673-691
43Temple Installation [continued]692-709
(i) Image installation; Door dimension; Determination of auspicious star & lunar date as per the formula of relative length and breadth of the plot in terms of finger units; Installation of images: sitting, standing etc. in accordance to the differentiation of directional doors.692-693
(ii) Mode of stabilisation of images on the seat according to mobile and stationary type; Mode of elsewhere installation after lifting the image in the event of displacement of the floor.693-694
(iii) Installation of a similar image in the event of damage of the image; Merit arising from installation of four-fold images; Installation of the images of Man-lion, Kapila, Tortoise etc. as per directional distinction.694-697
(iv) Interpretation of the term ‘Installation’ and its classification; Mode of construction of dwellings etc.698-700
(v) Synonomity of the words-stambha, sthuna etc.; Elucidation of six-fold spiritual paths: mantric etc. 700-703
(vi) Merit of renovation703-705
(vii) Atonement for breakage of images etc while work is in progress; Alternative ritual for the same 705-708
(viii) Merit accruing from Vaisnavite installation.708-709
Hereafter textual Lacuane, abruptly text stops & Samhita text is incomplete

Pauskara Samhita (In Two Volumes): A Rare Book - Sanskrit Text with English Translation

Item Code:
IDL172
Cover:
Hardcover
Edition:
1991
Publisher:
Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeetha
Size:
10.0" X 6.8"
Pages:
1493 (21 B/W Yantras Figures)
Other Details:
a50_books
Price:
$80.00   Shipping Free - 4 to 6 days
Notify me when this item is available
Notify me when this item is available
You will be notified when this item is available
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
Pauskara Samhita (In Two Volumes): A Rare Book - Sanskrit Text with English Translation

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 4828 times since 20th Jul, 2010
Foreword

In the Fourth Meeting of the Publication committee of Rashtriya Sanskrit Samsthan held on the fifth June 1976 at New Delhi, it was resolved that materials from the three Agamas-Vaikhanasa, Pancaratra and Saiva-should be collected and placed before the Publication Committee for compiling the Agama Kosa.

In early 1968 when I joined the Tirupati Vidyapeetha as Reader and Head of the Research and Publication wing, I observed that the material extracted from Pancaratra Samhitas for the Agama-Kosa, contained dubious readings and consequently the critical editions of the important text have to be undertaken by that wing. Dr. B.R. Sharma, the then Director suggested that critical editions of the Visvamitra-, and Pauskar-Samhitas might be brought out by the Research wing. The last mentioned Samhita was assigned to Dr last mentioned Samhita was assigned to Dr. P. P. Apte (the then Lecturer in the wing). Its publication was approved in a meeting of a publication committee 3-2-1986.

That in view of the importance of the Pauskar-Samhita in the Pancaratra-Canon, Critical edition of the text is a pressing need, was candidly admitted by H. Daniel SMITH in an article entitled, “The three gems of the Pancaratra-Canon-an appraisal” published in Vol I, Part I of the Vimars’a (pp. 45-51) of the K.S. Vidyapeetha (Tirupati 1972).

The Pauskar-Samhita (hereafter abbreviated to PS) contains about 5900 slokas, divided into 43 chapters, and it runs as a dialogue between Pauskara and Bhagawan on the technique of marshalling the Mandala designs and their significance in the first 26 chapters.

In this edition, Dr. APTE has utilized two Mss of PS-one from India office Library London and the other Supplied to him by Asuri Srinivas Ayyengar, who after entering into the Sanyasa-order is now known as HH Sri Yatiraja Sampatkumar Ramanjua Muni of Melkote.

The affiliation of the Pauskara-Paramesvara to Srirangam temple in the south, is obviously known from the Jayakhya (12cd) citation.

Satvatm Yadusailendre
Srirange Pauskaram tatha l

To put it particularly, the worship of Hari is carried out in accordance with Satvata-Isvara in Melkote, Pauskara-Parameshvara in Srirangam and Jayakhya-Padma in Kanchi.

Dr. Apte is specially qualified to undertake the responsibility of ending the PS because of his qualifications, training and experience, He obtained a doctorate degree in the Pancaratra, from the university of Poona, worked for about three years in the Agama Kosa wing of the Tirupati Vidyapeetha as Lecturer and attended several Agama conferences organized by the illustrations sage of Kanci at several temple centres in Kanci and other centres in Andhra Pradesh.

I trust the text of PS with its simple translation will go a long way to whet the appetite of students of temple religion in general and Vaisnavism in particular.

Introduction

An attempt has been made to reconstruct the scheme of 25 Mandalas described in ‘Pauskara Samihita’ of the Pancaratra Agama. ‘Pauskara Samhita’ is one of the three main canonical ‘samhita’ texts of the Pancaratra doctrine-a Vaisnavite religious sect in India. The three classical Samhitas of the Pancaratra Agama are: Sattvata Samhita, Pauskara Samhita and Jayakhya Samhita, and these texts date back to 3rd to 5th Century A.D.

Though mandala worship is described and mentioned in all three texts, it happens to be the central theme of ‘Pauskara Samhita’ – which describes in great details the technical construction of the mandalas to be drawn for the purpose of ‘Mandalaradhana’ (Mandala worship) as part of the initiation and progress of the spiritual aspirant seeking admission to the cult, with the final aim of attainment of Moksa.

The Pancaratra religious sect is still one of the important religious sects in the South India, however, the elaborate procedure of ‘Mandalaradhana’ as an independent institution as described in Pauskara Samhita has been relegated to the background in the course of centuries and forgotten.

The present reconstruction of Pauskara Samhita mandalas with the help of original textual description represents an important addition to the literature regarding ‘Mandala’ worship, as the date of Pauskara Samhita makes them among the oldest mandalas in the world.

MANDALARADHANA
IN PANCARATR AGAMA

India has been a land of cultural interactions and integrations. The heritage of the Vedic tradition was supplemented by Tantric and local traditions in the religio-cultural field of social life, in addition to the influences of Buddhism and Jainism etc. the Moksa-dharmaparvan of the ‘Mahabharata’ has stored encyclopaedic information on various religious sects Saiva, Pancaratra, Pasupata etc. the Pancaratra docrine believing in one and only God ‘Visnu’ and instructing the Satvata mode of worship has occupied an important place in this parvan being allotted a separate Narayaniya section for this cult variously named as Ekantidharma or the Sattvata or Bhagavatavidhi. The Gita verses ‘Imam Vivasvate yogam’.. (4.1-7) apparently refer to this Ekantidharma tradition. This tradition seems to have developed into the temple-oriented phase of the Pancaratra in the post-Mahabharata period. An integrated scheme of worship called ‘Catuh-sthana-arcana’ came to be accepted in the temple religion. This scheme includes in addition to the image worship invocation and worship in Kumbha (water-pot), Mandala (mystic diagram), and Kunda (fire-pit).

Mandalas are said to be mystic diagrams-mystic in the sense they are used in a mystic way or for a mystic purpose often connected with tantrism. The diagrams known as Yantra-Cakra-Bhadra etc. form an allotropy of mystic symbolisms of which Mandala is one.

The Mandala worship is found prescribed in all the three classical samhitas of the Pancaratra Agama: Sattvata, Pauskara and Jayakhya of 3rd to 5th Century A D That the worship of God with the aid of mystic diagrams was incorporated in the Pancaratra ritualism from its earliest phase is evidenced from the canonical text Sattvata Samhita referring to a wheel inscribed with mantras (mantra-cakra) in 2:12. It explains further a form of worship in the mandala diagrams (Mandlaradhana). It is quite likely that this practice was adopted in the Pancaratra religion from tantric tradition. But soon after adoption in the Pancaratra family, it has been fully and finally Vaisnavised and has developed and maintained its personality as such with sectarian characteristics all along.

The scheme of Mandalas happens to be the central theme of the Pauskara Samhita. The temple institution having a very firm footing in the South India owes allegiance to the classical Samhitas of admittedly, northern origin especially in Kashmir.

The Vaisnavism apparently remodeled the tantric elements of Mantras, Mandalas and Mudras to suit their inherent tenets and practices. The Pauskara Samhita reflects the clarity of vision of the Pancaratra seers evolving the scientific and elaborate scheme of Mandalaradhana which might be said to be a prototype of Alayaradhana or the temple-worship later on incorporating and preserving the mandala-worship along with the Agni and Kumbha worships under the ‘Catusthanarcana’ curriculum of rituals.

For understanding the topic of Mandalas, the Pauskara Samhita (PS-c. 300-400 (A D) which is next in authority to Sattvata Samhita (SS) is extremely important, since it elaborates the technical aspect of these diagrams and serves as a source book for later Pancaratra religion, on the subject of Mandalaradhana-Jayakhya Samhita (JS) the third canonical text also gives one specimen: Navapadmamandala and the rest of the Samhitas post classical and later ones describe one or more such diagrams. The Pauskara Samhita is of special value because here one gets a detailed scheme of sketching, designing and colouring of the Mandalas.

The place of Mandala worship in the historical Pan-caratra religion especially the temple cult in South India is as an important component of the fourfold worship offered to God who is invoked in image, pitcher, mandala and fire (Bimba, Kumbha, Mandala and Agni). From PS, however, it appears that the Mandala worship, in those davs was not a part of the temple ritual only, but often maintained its independent existence like the sacrificial institution. And for that ritual known as Yaga, a special pandal was erected on a site chosen on a mountain or in a forest or by the side of a hermitage or on the bank of a river or inside temple premises (PS 2.4.5.). The formal purpose of the Mandalaradhana is the initiation and progress of the spiritual aspirant seeking admission to the cult and the final goal is obviously the attainment of Moksa. PS (Chapter I) prescribes four main classes of Mandalas: Padmodara or lotus hearted, Aneka-kajagarbha or multi-lotus, Cakrabja or lotus-surrounded-by-circle, and Misracakra or of complex-wheels. These are meant for aspirants passing through various grades of progress: Samayi, Putraka, Sadhaka and Acarya. The aspirant practices some sort of Yogic-cum tantric process of self-restraint with the help of the diagrams aiming at the final liberation. It is assured that the aspirant by entangling himself in these diagrams really frees himself of all bondages. The merit of the Mandalaradhana accrues by even witnessing, worshipping it or meditating upon it. These Yagas continue for a period extending up to forty days or more.

At a later stage, the human tendency to utilize the mysterious powers for personal visible benefit seems to have outweighed the urge for spiritual uplift and the Mandala worship was yoked for mercenary ends as seen from Sriprasna Samhita (52:56-63). The diagrams were sometimes drawn on canvas or wall instead of being drawn on the ground.

The elaborate procedure of ‘Mandalaradhana’ as an independent institution has gradually been relegated to the background in the course of time. The Pauskara Samhita which has been preserved as an article of faith has suffered a lot in faithful preservation as an article of faith has suffered a lot in faithful preservation of the portions dealing with the technical niceties of sketching and colouring of elaborate patterns of complicate geometrical descriptions.

Both the approaches, the grammatical of the Sanskritist or the geometrical of the technologist often fall short in interpreting these passages. All the same persistent efforts by researchers do yield valuable results. It is felt that this chapter of our rich cultural heritage revealed by this interpretative methodology would interest the scholars and designers alike.

Foreword Blessing

We are happy that the second part of Pauskarasamhita (Chs. 27 - 43) is being published, alongwith English translation done by Dr. Prabhakar Pandurang Apte. We are more happy about the revised elegant format of the book placing Sanskrit verses and English translation of the same. It is also praiseworthy that the editor has made much progress over our first Devanagari edition published in 1934. At that time due to numerous Granthapatas which could not be filled in spite of our efforts to collect and collate available palm leaf manuscripts in Grantha character, we had to print the text with gaps. We are happy that the present editor has succeded in filling in hundreds of lacunae on the strength of his deep penetration into content-analysis. He has used square brackets to indicate that the gaps have been filled by him after giving due consideration to contextual content. This kind of labour on the part of the editor is approved by Jayakhya Samhita (c. 450 A.D.) following words: Pranasta-Pathavakyanam Krtva Vastuvicaranam… prayatnat samskaroti vai. We had given our blessings to the publication of first part in 1991. We are happy that the research in Pancaratra started with the publication of Ahirbudhnya samhita critically edited by F. Otto Schrader continues in 1916. We very well know the hardship undergone by the pioneers of Pancaratra research. When Schrader wrote his ‘Introduction to Pancaratra and Ahirbudhnya Samhita’, he was interned as political prisoner in Ahmadnagar Jail. The proofs were being sent to him for correction. The intellectual contribution of that jail was made known to the world only after thirty years when Discovery of India by late Pandit Jawaharlal Nahru was written there. When we had written a letter to Schrader, making some querries about Pancaratra research, he had written to us that he was leading miserable days at the fag end of the life. We felt sad to read the line that it was difficult for him to get food even once in two days. We have personally witnessed the hardships experienced by our Guruji, H.H. Yadugiri Yatiraja Ramanuja muni, for our Pauskara samhita in Devanagari, we had to purchase Nagari fonts from Nirnayasagar press, Bombay and train the compositors to use them in Madras press. We had also purchased tradle machine and operated it in Yatiraj Math, Madras and spread the papers to dry them on the floor. We are including this account in our foreward so that the computer generation should know the evolution and growth of printing technology in Sanskrit publications.

We appreciate the efforts put in by the editor and translator as well as publishers in bringing out this valued publication. In the first part sketching, colouring and mode of worship of Mandala diagrams was special contribution. In the second part Vaisnava Sraddha procedure supplemented by deep philosophical layers, the Pavitrarohana ritual, the scientific philosophical layers, the Pavitrarohana ritual, the scientific philosophical basis of Tirthaksetras and Tirthayatras, the significance of various endowments: Vidyapitha Pratisthana etc. and the role of Sthapati in temple building and renovation activity are special contributions. The editor has done fair justice to these topics in his translation. Our blessings to both editor and publishers.

About the Author

The Author who holds a masters degree in Sanskrit and law and a doctorate in Agamas, is specially qualified to edit the text, in view of his qualifications, training and experience in the field of his specialization-i.e., Agamashastra. He has worked for three years in the Agama Kosha wing of the Tirupati Vidyapeetha. He has not only attended several Agama conferences, and national and international conferences but also presented several original papers on various aspects of Agamas. He has to his credit several research papers published in renowned Indological journals. He holds at present the position of Editor of the Encyclopaedic Dictionary of Sanskrit on Historical Principles of the Deccan College, Pune.

From Part II

Foreword

It is a matter of great pride and privilege that the Rashtriya Sanskrit Vidyapeetha, Tirupati is going to bring out the Volume – II of “Pauskara Samhita” with the help of the editorial craftsmanship of Prof. Prabhakar Pandurang Apte as well as the constant efforts of the Research and Publication Department of our University. The first Volume of “Pauskara Samhita” was published by the Vidyapeetha in the year 1991 and the same has been well received by the scholars and Researchers. In fact the wide appreciation of the 1st Volume by the world of scholars has prompted us to bring out the Volume II to cater to the needs of those interested in temple culture, Art technology and various rituals under Pancaratra canon.

It is well known that out of three Agamas, i.e. Vaikhanas, Pancaratra and Saiva; the Pancaratra Agama plays a dominant role particularly in South India, so far as performance of various rituals in the temples of this part of country is concerned. There are three gems of classical Samhitas of the Pancaratra Agama i.e. (i) Sattvata Samhita, (ii) Pauskara Samhita, (iii) Jayakhya Samhita and these texts were composed in between 3rd to 5th century A.D. Pauskara Samhita describes in detail the technical construction and colouring of Mandalas to be designed for the purpose of “Mandalavadhana”; an effective measure for attainment of salvation. Hence, “Pauskara Samhita” is not only considered as an authority on Vaisnavism in terms of performance of various types of rituals in the temples but also as a treatise relating to the unique Art. Technology of ancient India. The authority of the text is evident from the fact that so many propounders and exponents of Vaisnavism including Yatiraja Ramanuja have off-quoted “Pauskara Samhita” to substantiate their views and theories.

Needless to mention that a Puja (worship), if performed as per the procedures laid down in an authentic treatise, is bound to fetch good results and merits for the “Yajaman” and the same helps strengthen the mental and spiritual power by generating an atmosphere of peace and tranquility around us. That is the reason why the Sastras have been considered significant and any deviation from the scriptural prescriptions may be counter-productive. So says Srimad Bhagavad Gita.

Yah: Shastrvidhimutsrjy vartte kamkartah I
N S Sididhimvaproti n such n para gatim II
Tasmachcghhastra praman te karyakaryavyavasithtou I
Jhatva shastrvidhanokta karm kartumiharhsi II

Not only for marshalling the Mandala designs; but also for understanding the underlying spirit and significance of Vaisnava culture of the country, the Sastras like “Pauskara Samhita” are very much essential for the mankind and relevant to the society. Even in the modern era of science and technology the significance of these ancient Sastras, based upon eternal truths and time-tested experiments, can not be ruled out. Hence, there is a dire necessity of exposition, promotion, comprehension and publication of these ancient treatise like “Pauskara Samhta”

May I avail this opportunity to express my deep sense of gratitude to those including Dr. V. Jaddipal, Head of the Department and Prof. Prabhakar Pandurang Apte and others, but for whose intellectual exercise, the concerned volume could not have seen the light of the earth and I hope that the concerned volume will be well-received as the part 1st by the scholars, researchers, readers and others interested in the Vaisnavism.

Contents

PAUSKARA SAMHITA (Translation)
TABLE OF CONTENS
CH. I DISCIPLES’S TEST (vv. 1-54 pp. 1-9)
1Disciple-Teacher Dialogue1-5
2Classification of Mandalas6-15
3Mandala Worship16-25
4Fruit of Mandala Worship26-32
5Initiation and Imparting of Knowledge by the Teacher33-44
6The fate of premature death before completion of worship45-54
CH. II SOIL-TESTING (vv. 1-44½ pp. 10-15 )
S. No Topic Verse No.
1Selection of Site for Mandala Worship1-8
2Merits and defects of the Soil9-16
3Commendable Sites17-20½
4Soil-Tests21-26
5Worship of lord of Sites27-35
6Post worship ritual36-44½
CH III ORIENTATION (vv. 1-96 pp. 16-29)
S No.TopicVerse No.
1Ascertainment of direction with the help of a gnomon1-22
2Zodiac-wise shadow-length23-29
3Fixation and application of the Sanku30-39
4Ditermination of East West and North South40-48
5Preparation of square ground for Vastu Mandala49-58
6Sketching of the Vastu Mandala diagram (9 X 9 = 81)58-96
CH. IV CHARACTERISTICS OF PENDAL FOR MANDALA WORSHIP (vv. 1-277 pp. 30-56)
S. No.TopicVerse No.
1Measurement, Scales1-12
2Measurement of passages13-17
3Schetching of pendal grand17-21
4Pendal walls21-28
5Coating of the walls29-30
6Pendal Doors : height and width31-35
7Door guards36-49
8Door frames50-52
9Windows53-56
10Construction of Columns: shapes57-93
11Enclosure I canopy I shape, color94-102
12Varying height of pendals103-112
13Arches113-130
14Altar-decorations131-134
15Banners-various colours-emblems135-162
16Retinue-deities162-196
17Perfuming the arches196-201
18Fumgation201-207
CH. V. MANDALA DIAGRAMS (vv. 343 pp. 57-148)
S. No. TopicPage No.
1Bhadraka57-58
2Aghanirmocana58-59
3Sadadhva59-60
4Dharmakhya61-62
5Vasagarbha62-64
6Sarvakamaprada64-65
7Amitraghna66-68
8Avusya68-70
9Balabhadra70-74
10Paustika74-78
11Arogyaka78-82
12Viveka82-85
13Vagisa85-88
14Manasa88-93
15Jayakhya93-97
16Svastika97-104
17Ananta104-108
18Nityakhya108-113
19Bhutavasa113-117
20Amogha118-122
21Supratistha122-127
22Buddhyadhara127-132
23Gunakara132-138
24Dhruvakhya138-144
25Paramananda144-148
CH. VI LOTUS DESIGNS (vv. 1-85. pp 149-153)
1Bloomed and badded lotus designs1-12
2Three petals to twenty seven fetals:13-17
3Filaments17-22
4Oval shaped lotus22-23
5Method of drawing lotus design24-29
6Multi petal lotuses30-34
7Shattered petals34-39
8Compact petals40-43
9Unseen part of the petals43-50
10Petal-joints43-50
11Colouring51-61
12Writing of Mantras and worship61-85
Note : As the text is obscure, the contents are para-phrased instead of translating them literally.
CH. VII CHARACTERISTICS OF THE
COMPOSITE DESIGN (vv. 1-173.) (pp 154-158)
1Design patterns according to petals1-22
2Scale and area23-40
3Obscure portions41-173
Note: Since the major part of the chapter is obscure and not suitable for diagrmatic reconstruction the said portions are not amenable for coherent translation.
CH. VIII CHAKRABJA-LAKSHANA
(vv. 1-212) (pp. 159-169)
1Thousand varities of Chakrabja design1-7
2Diagram worship in nine types wheels8-17
3Drawing method of lotuses18-37
4Procedure of worship38-43
5Nine patterns of wheels44-62
6Association of wheels with time divisions months, years etc.63-80
Note : The remaining part 81 and 212 is obscure and hence not amenable for cohuent translation.
CH. IX (CHARACTERISTICS OF MIXED LOTUS-WHEEL DESIGN (vv 1-165) (pp. 170-190)
1Various patterns of mixed wheel-designs1-27
2Area of encircle lotuses28-43
3Designing of circumcircle44-46
4Spokes of the wheel47-51
5Wheels with 1000 spokes52-65
6Complex wheels named Yugachakra66-71
7Devachakra72-77
8Ground area for wheels78-84
9Colour Scheme85-90
10Formation of entrances corridors etc91-95
11Application of Mantras in wheel-worship96-104
12Invocation of Lord Purush and eightfold Prakriti105-109
13Invocation of Vedas110-111
14Importance of Mantras112-119
15Analogy of human body to wheel diagram120-137
16Assignment of Omkar syllable138-140
17Assignment of Lord of Mantras141-145
18Medilation146-165
CH. X COMPOSITE MANDAL DESIGN OF NINE CONSTITUENTS (vv. 1-9) (pp 91-199)
1Nine Prakrtis manifested into fourfold manifestations and five other aspects of Vishnu1-35
2Sketching of the Navatmamandal36-45
3Diagram No. 2-Purvatmamandala etc.46-74
4Completion of the nine motifs75-76
5Colouring of various parts77-94
CH XI VRTABIMBALAKSANA
(vv. 1-12) (pp. 00-201)
1Six parts denoting Six divine attributes1-2
2Corresponding colour application 3-4
3Sketching of various parts5-11
4Drawing of lotus at the centre and worshiping Vasudeva therein12
CH. XII PANCAPADMA-CAKRABIMBA-LAKSANA (vv. 1-28) (pp. 28202-206)
1Five designs in five directions1-3
2Sketching of Pancapadma4-10
3Colouring11-18
4Worship of the Lord of motifs19-22
5Cakrabimba23
CH. XIII SURYABIMBA LAKSANA
(vv. 1-13) (pp. 207-208)
1Sketching and colouring1-10
2Drawing of the rays11
3Drawing of the lotus12
4Fruit of worship13
CH. XIV CANDRABIMBA LAKSANA
(vv. 1-16) (pp. 209-210)
1Sketching1-10
2Colouring11-12
3Worship13-15
4Fruit of worship16
CH. XV TRIKONA-BIMBA-LAKSANA
(vv. 1-35) (pp. 211-215)
1Triangular units1-9
2Mandal-parts10-30
3Colouring31-32
4Assignment of Vedas etc.33
5Worship of Brahman and attainment of Moksa34-35
CH. XVI KURMA-BIMBA-LAKSANA
(vv. 1-48) (pp. 216-218)
1Designing of the sketch of a tortoise in a square1-35
2Mouth portion of the tortoise36-39
3Drawing a lotus40-41
4Colouring42-47
5Worship of Vishnu48
CH. XVII SANKHA-BIMBA-LAKSANA
(vv. 1-45) (pp. 219-223)
1Drawing a square measuring 32X321-10
2The conch design11-40
3Colouring41-45
4Worship of Nrsimh45½
CH. XVIII KALASA-BIMBA-LAKSANA
(vv. 1-62) (pp. 224-230)
1The design of a waterpot in a square measuring 40X401-2
2Various parts of the waterpot10-37
3Mantric ritual38-41
4Lotus-design42-43
5Outer parts of the Mandal44-45
6Colouring46-49
7Worship of Varah50
8General instructions regarding51-58
9Mandal motifs-Fruit of Worship59-62
CH. XIX WORSHIP OF NINE NAVEL DIAGRAM
(vv. -140) (pp. 231-240)
1Purpose of ninenaval worship1-5
2Various fruits of worship6-16
3Further spiritual progress on rebirth17-21
4Final fruit of worship22-23
5Nine motifs in the federal Mandal diagram24-28
6Invocation of the Lord29-47
7Revival of worship in the deserted places48-74
8Ritual of worship of Federal Mandal75-129
9Vishwedeva tarpana130-140
CH. XX WORSHIP OF VISVAKSENA
(vv. 1-121) (pp. 230-266)
1Purpose of Worship1-14
2Diagram for worship15-18
3Ritual of worship19-22
4Meditation of Visvaksena23-38
5Meditation on retinue deities39-51
6Worship of the retinue52
7Prowess of Visvaksena53-57
8Worship of Visvaksena in relation to Vasudev58-82
9Dos and donts requiring naivedya offerings83-121
CH. XXI CHARACTERISTICS OF RETINUE (deities)
(vv. 1.23) (pp. 267-270)
1The names of the prowesses of the goddesses1-7
2Assignment on various parts8-18
3Description of the goddesses19-22
4Worship23
CH. XXII CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SUPPORT
AND THE SEAT (vv. 1-75) (pp. 271-280)
1Description of the seats and supports1-16
2Meditation on principles and elements and attributes17-26
3Assignment of Various principles on various lotus-parts27-47
4Meditation upon Mantrashakti48-61
5Existence of divine power I the structure of Mantras62-75
CH. XXIII ASSIGNMENT OF SEAT-DEITIES
(vv. 1-71) (pp. 281-289)
1Substratum-substrata relationship of diagram and the deity1-7
2The efficacy of the Mantras8-12
3Worship of divine in various seats and supports13-20
4Presence of the Divine in various supports in subtle and grows forms21-27
5Invocation of the divine forms in varions parts of Mandals28-71
CH. XXIV CHARACTERISTICS OF DEITIES OF SUPPORTS AND SEATS (vv. 1-57) (pp. 290-297)
1Assignment of various deities Male & female on various Mandal parts1-38
2Meditation on Sudarshan39-41
3Meditation on the Supreme Lord42-47
4Guard attendents48-57
CH. XXV THE DESCRIPTION OF SUPPORT
(vv. 1-41) (pp. 298-303)
1Code of conduct for rituals1-41
CH. XXVI DETAILS OF THE OFFERINGS
(vv. Vv. 1-60) (pp 01-312)
1Types of food offering1-9
2Other offerings10-25
3General rules about offerings26-40
PAUSKARA SAMHITA – PART II
TABLE OF CONTENTS

(Page Nos. Refer to English Translation)
27Homage to Ancestors370-439
(i) Routine homage ritual370-383
(ii) Occassional homage ritual384-393
(iii) Contingent discussion of mantra-application393-426
(iv) Intentional homage ritual246-238
28Specification of Source of Fire239-243
29Characteristics of Fire Pit444-459
30Mounting of Sacred garland460-481
31People’s Duty:-482-510
(i) Ritual of sleeping and awakening of Lord Visnu during caturmasya: cluster of four months482-486
(ii) Rules for devotees entering Lord’s shrine486-488
(iii) Rules for vows489-490
(iv) Mode of meditation on specific deity during ablution ritual490-493
(v) Ritual in the fire-chamber493-497
(vi) Ritual of par-taking food at conclusion of vow497
(vii) Interpretation of the term anuyaga (subsequent worship)497
(viii) Propitiation of cordial fire at the end of lunch498-499
(ix) Prohibition of donation of oblation to non-devotees499
(x) Collection of popular divine duties500-502
(xi) Lord’s worship according to change of time502-508
(xii) Fruit of varieties of fasts508-509
(xiii) Excellence of merit accruing from dvadasi vow: (twelfth lunar day)509-510
32Decision on Lapse of Worship511-525
(i) Discussion on lapse of worship511-514
(ii) Merit of action subservient to knowledge515-518
(iii) Discussion of domestic worship of images (a) established by ancestors; (b) gifted by preceptor; (c) self-obtained; (d) deposited by someone else; (e) bought on payment; (iv) Discrimination of worship of God’s images;518-520
(iv) Elucidation of righteous path;520-521
(v) Equanimity of merit inspite of differentiation in worship owing to emotional devotion.521-525
33Comprehensive Description of Cosmic Principles526-543
(i) Enumeration of tenets; Worship of images of four manifestations, Merit differentiation of worship of different images.526-534
(ii) Thought on conquest over cosmic tenets534-538
(iii) Voidability and acceptability of set of cosmic tenets539-540
(iv) Comprehension of spirituality etc. of collection of cosmic tenets540-543
34Characteristics of Incense-Burner & Bell544-551
35Characteristics of Incense-Container552-558
(i) Sketching of cakrabja-Mandala552-553
(ii) Characteristics of Incense – Vessel/container553-558
36Contemplation on the Topic of Shrines559-601
(i) Discussion of temples: Mention by name of some shrines established by accomplished persons and meritorious people spiritual progress of inhabitants there to 559-566
(ii) Discussion of spiritual gait of persons born and dead within temple premises566-570
(iii) Pervasion of twenty six cosmic tenets by the divine manifestations: Vasudeva etc570-571
(iv) Indication about emblems and ornaments of aforesaid images.571-583
(v) Indication about the sacred places, congregation of Cosmic Principles583-585
(vi) Lord’s of sacred places585-601
37Contemplation on the topic of Shrines [continued]602-608
(i) Remainder of previous chapter602
(ii) Discussion about placement of objects bearing marks of conch, disc and foot impression of the Lord.602-608
38Elucidation of Eligible Persons609-638
(i) Discussion about eligibility of persons regarding installation: Presence of God on the strength of mantra-s, Ritual of re-installation of images separated by divine presence due to lapse of time609-610
(ii) Definition of the term ‘installation’610-613
(iii) Compromise about admixtural worship613-615
(iv) Ritual of procurement of image615-618
(v) Discussion about defects such as damage accruing to image etc.618-622
(vi) Elaboration of atonement of defect622-624
(vii) Lordly effulgence624
(viii) Mode of meditation of Mandalas: mystic diagrams.624-635
(ix) Narration of time division635-636
(x)Characteristics of doctrine637-638
39Determination of Agamas639-642
40Characteristics of Holy Altar643-653
41Establishment of Various religions establishments/endowments654-672
(i) Ritual of installation of penta-temple-complex654-658
(ii) Definition of the term ‘installation’610-613
(iii) Compromise about admixtural worship613-615
(iv) Ritual of procurement of image615-618
(v) Discussion about defects such as damage accruing to image etc.618-622
(vi) Elaboration of atonement of defect622-624
(vii) Lordly effulgence624
(viii) Mode of meditation on Mandalas: mystic diagrams624-635
(ix) Narration of time division635-636
(x) Characterstics of doctrine637-638
39Determination of Agamas639-642
40Characterstics of Holy Altar643-653
41Establishment of Various religious establishments/endowments654-672
(i) Ritual of installation of penta-temple-complex654-658
42Temple Installation.673-691
43Temple Installation [continued]692-709
(i) Image installation; Door dimension; Determination of auspicious star & lunar date as per the formula of relative length and breadth of the plot in terms of finger units; Installation of images: sitting, standing etc. in accordance to the differentiation of directional doors.692-693
(ii) Mode of stabilisation of images on the seat according to mobile and stationary type; Mode of elsewhere installation after lifting the image in the event of displacement of the floor.693-694
(iii) Installation of a similar image in the event of damage of the image; Merit arising from installation of four-fold images; Installation of the images of Man-lion, Kapila, Tortoise etc. as per directional distinction.694-697
(iv) Interpretation of the term ‘Installation’ and its classification; Mode of construction of dwellings etc.698-700
(v) Synonomity of the words-stambha, sthuna etc.; Elucidation of six-fold spiritual paths: mantric etc. 700-703
(vi) Merit of renovation703-705
(vii) Atonement for breakage of images etc while work is in progress; Alternative ritual for the same 705-708
(viii) Merit accruing from Vaisnavite installation.708-709
Hereafter textual Lacuane, abruptly text stops & Samhita text is incomplete
Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy

Related Items

सात्वत संहिता:  Satvata Samhita (Set of 2 Volumes)
by Dr. Bhasyam Swamy
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
Academy of Sanskrit Research, Melkote
Item Code: NZG187
$90.00
Umapathi's Commentary on the Pauskaratantra
by Usha Colas -Chauhan
Hardcover (Edition: 2007)
Sri Satguru Publiocations
Item Code: NAD111
$35.00
सात्वत संहिता: Satvata Samhita with the Commentary of Alashinga Bhatta: – Volume II
by Alashinga Bhatta
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
Academy of Sanskrit Research, Melkote
Item Code: NAC847
$50.00
Isvarasamhita  in Five Volumes
by V.Varadachari and G.C. Tripathi
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts and Motilal Banarsidass
Item Code: IHE045
$185.00
सात्वतसंहिता : Satvata Samhita
by Dr. Bhasyam Swamy
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
Academy of Sanskrit Research, Melkote
Item Code: NAB771
$40.00
SOLD
The Parakhyatantra: A Scripture of The Saiva Siddhanta
by Dominic Goodall
Hardcover (Edition: 2004)
Institut Francais De Pondichery
Item Code: NAK822
$60.00
Fundamentals of the Philosophy of Tantras (An Old and Rare Book)
by Manoranjan Basu
Hardcover (Edition: 1986)
Mira Basu Publishers
Item Code: IDE397
$40.00
Paramesvaragamah
by Dr. Rama Ghose, Sanskrit Text Edited by Pt. Vrajavallabha Dwivedi
Hardcover (Edition: 2004)
Shaiva Bharati Shodha Pratishthanam, Varanasi
Item Code: IDI707
$40.00
The Saivaparibhasa of Sivagrayogin (An Old and Rare Book)
by S.S. Suryanarayana Sastri
Paperback (Edition: 1982)
University of Madras
Item Code: NAK013
$30.00
Paramesvaragamah
by Dr. Rama Ghose Sanskrit Text Edited by Pt. Vrajavallabha Dwivedi
Paperback (Edition: 2004)
Shaiva Bharati Shodha Pratishthanam, Varanasi
Item Code: IDK385
$35.00
SOLD
A History of Indian Philosophy (5 Vols. Set)
by Surendranath Dasgupta
Paperback (Edition: 2015)
Motilal Banarsidas Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: IDD346
$105.00

Testimonials

Received the consignment in time. Excellent service. I place on record your prompt service and excellent way the product was packed and sent. Kindly accept my appreciation and thanks for all those involved in this work. My prayers t the Almighty to continue the excellent service for the many more years to come. Long live EXOTIC INDIA and its employees
N.KALAICHELVAN, Tamil Nadu
A very thorough and beautiful website and webstore. I have tried for several years to get this Bhagavad Gita Home Study Course from Arshavidya and have been unable. Was so pleased to find it in your store!
George Marshall
A big fan of Exotic India. Have been for years and years. I am always certain to find exactly what I am looking for in your merchandise.
John Dash, western New York, USA
I just got my order and it’s exactly as I hoped it would be!
Nancy, USA.
It is amazing. I am really very very happy with your excellent service. I received the book today in an awesome condition. Thanks again.
Shambhu, New York.
Thank you for making available some many amazing literary works!
Parmanand Jagnandan, USA
I have been very happy with your service in selling Puranas. I have bought several in the past and am happy with the packaging and care you exhibit. Thank you for this Divine Service.
Raj, USA
Thank you very much! My grandpa received the book today and the smile you put on his face was priceless. He has been trying to order this book from other companies for months now. He only recently asked me for help and you have made this transaction so easy. My grandpa is so happy he wants to order two more copies. I am currently in the process of ordering 2 more.
Rinay, Australia
I would just let you know that today I received my order. It was packed so beautifully and what lovely service.
Caroline, Australia
I have received the book in good condition. Thanks a lot for your excellent service!
Gabe, Netherlands
TRUSTe online privacy certification
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2016 © Exotic India