Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend

An Introduction to Madhubani Paintings

Article of the Month - December 1999
Viewed 18260 times since 2nd Oct, 2008

Hindu women who live in villages near the market town of Madhubani in northern India maintain old traditions and teach them to their daughters. Painting is one of the traditional skills that is passed down from generation to generation in the families of some of the women. They paint figures from nature and myth on household and village walls to mark the seasonal festivals of the religious year, for special events of the life-cycle, and when marriages are being arranged they prepare intricately designed wedding proposals.

But even though women in the villages around Madhubani have been practicing their folk art, for centuries, the world at large has come to know about these women and to consider them to be "artists" only in the last thirty years. Even now, most of their work remains anonymous. The women, some of them illiterate, are in any case reluctant to consider themselves individual producers of "works of art" and only a few of them mark the paintings with their own name.

Among the first modern outsiders to document the tradition of Madhubani painting were William and Mildred Archer. He was a British civil servant assigned to the district during the colonial era. The Archers obtained some drawings on paper that the women painters were using as aids to memory. Works that the Archers collected went to the India Records Office in London (now part of the British Library) where a small number of specialists could study them as creative instances of India's folk art.

What led the women painters to share their work with the larger world was a major ecological and economic crisis that resulted from a prolonged drought in 1966-68 that struck Madhubani and the surrounding region of Mithila. In order to create a new source of non-agricultural income, the All-India Handicrafts Board encouraged the women artists to produce their traditional paintings on handmade paper for commercial sale. Since then, painting has become a primary source of income for scores of families.

Production and initial marketing have been regulated by regional craft guilds, the state government of Bihar, and the Government of India. But the continuing market in this art throughout the world is a tribute to the resourcefulness of the women of Mithila who have successfully transferred their techniques of bhitti chitra or wall-painting to the medium of paper, and have resisted the temptation to adapt their traditional designs too freely in pursuit of unpredictable public tastes.

The paper itself is handmade and treated with cowdung and the colours used are extracted from vegetables. People of Mithila have their own language and a sense of regional identity that goes back more than 2500 years. Among the most celebrated figures believed to have been born in the region are Mahavira (a great spiritual hero of the Jain religion), Siddhartha Gautama (better known to the world as the Buddha), and Sita (the legendary wife of Prince Rama and herself a central figure in the world's epic the Ramayana).

The Region of Mithila Near the India-Nepal Border Commercialization of the folk art has been a mixed blessing. It has been regulated by governmental bureaucracies, has generated a multi-levelled distribution system, and has put a premium on productivity per se - independent of any meaningful connection to the traditional cycles of village life and the rhythms of the religious year. But it also has allowed people around the world to discover a style of art with a long heritage linked to the lives of women, and that retains evident signs of its rootedness in a vital folk tradition. And, more to the point, it has created a new source of gainful employment in rural India for women and their families. The exhibited paintings include examples of several themes in the representational but stylized and symbolic Madhubani tradition - the great life-cycle rite of marriage; some of the major goddesses and gods of the Hindu pantheon; domesticated and wild animals.

Post a Comment
 
Post Review
  • Nitin Kumar has written an excellent article. It really helps the cause of folk art in India, especially Madhubani and its rich heritage. I am using the article in my website: www.artmitul.weebly.com, of course, giving all the courtsy to your site and Nitin Kumar. If you have any issues, please let me know and I will take it off.

    Regards
    Mitul
    by Mitul Bhattacharya on 15th Mar 2011
Testimonials
Fast and reliable service.
Dharma Rao, Canada
You always have a great selection of books on Hindu topics. Thank you!
Gayatri, USA
Excellent e-commerce website with the most exceptional, rare and sought after authentic India items. Thank you!
Cabot, USA
Excellent service and fast shipping. An excellent supplier of Indian philosophical texts
Libero, Italy.
I am your old customer. You have got a wonderful collection of all products, books etc.... I am very happy to shop from you.
Usha, UK
I appreciate the books offered by your website, dealing with Shiva sutra theme.
Antonio, Brazil
I love Exotic India!
Jai, USA
Superzoom delivery and beautiful packaging! Thanks! Very impressed.
Susana
Great service. Keep on helping the people
Armando, Australia
I bought DVs supposed to receive 55 in the set instead got 48 and was in bad condition appears used and dusty. I contacted the seller to return the product and the gave 100% credit with apologies. I am very grateful because I had bought and will continue to buy products here and have never received defective product until now. I bought paintings saris..etc and always pleased with my purchase until now. But I want to say a public thank you to whom it may concern for giving me the credit. Thank you. Navieta.
Navieta N Bhudu
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
Share with friends
Related Items
Madhubani Painting
Madhubani Painting
$35.00
Madhubani Painting
BIRDS AND ANIMALS IN INDIAN ART
BIRDS AND ANIMALS IN INDIAN ART
Paperback
GEETIKA JAIN
$7.50
BIRDS AND ANIMALS IN INDIAN ART
Ardhanarishvara
Ardhanarishvara
Madhubani Painting On Hand Made Paper
Folk Painting from the Village of Madhubani (Bihar)
20.0 inches X 28.0 inches
$195.00
Ardhanarishvara
Fishermen
Fishermen
Madhubani Painting on Hand Made Paper
Folk Painting from the Village of Madhubani (Bihar)
Artist B.K. Karna
28 inches X 20 inches
$165.00
Fishermen
Madhubani Painting
Madhubani Painting
Hardcover
Mulk Raj Anand
$27.50
Madhubani Painting
Mahakali - The Cosmic Form of Goddess Kali

Mahakali
Mahakali - The Cosmic Form of Goddess Kali Mahakali
Madhubani Painting On Hand Made Paper
Folk Painting from the Village of Madhubani (Bihar)
21.0 inches X 29.0 inches
$205.00
Mahakali - The Cosmic Form of Goddess Kali

Mahakali
Show More
Related Links
Art Gallery
Madhubani Paintings
Show More
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2018 © Exotic India