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Join the royal world of Kings and Queens and experience the imperial times

The word maharaja, in a real sense 'extraordinary lord', evokes a dream of quality and eminence. These royal leaders of India assumed a significant part inside a social and verifiable setting and were supporters of human arts, both in India and Europe. That brought about glorious items representative of regal status, power, and character. The title appears to have been presented at some point by the Kushāns. They were influenced by the Śaka (Scythian) and Persian-Mongolian leaders of northwestern India and favored the honorific "extraordinary ruler" over "lord." Chandra Gupta I, the third ruler of the Gupta time frame, took the title mahārājādhirāja ("extraordinary lord of rulers"), a Sanskrit delivering of the Persian shahanshah. Other, even more, swelled honorifics followed, and during specific periods even vassal lords with somewhat little property were known as maharajas. Some great Maharajas of India are-


  1. King Ashoka


Ashoka was the last significant sovereign of the Mauryan dynasty of India. His vivacious support of Buddhism during his rule encouraged the extension of that religion all through India. Following his effective, however bloody success, of the Kalinga country on the east coast, Ashoka disavowed armed triumph and took on a strategy that he called "victory by dharma" (i.e., by standards of right life). To acquire wide exposure for his lessons and his work, Ashoka spread the word about them through oral declarations and inscriptions on rocks and pillars at appropriate destinations.


  1. Wajid Ali Shah


Amjad Ali Shah's oldest child, Wajid Ali Shah, who was ultimately bound to be the last leader of Awadh, rose to the lofty position of Awadh in 1847. Wajid Ali Shah was an extraordinary benefactor of vocalists, performers, artists, and various other artists. He was likewise extraordinarily inspired by design and architecture. He began building the Qaiser bagh royal residence when he ascended the throne.



  1. Maharaja Ranjit Singh


Maharaja Ranjit Singh, prestigiously known as the Lion of the Punjab or Sher-e-Punjab was an incredible ruler and was instrumental in building the Sikh realm of Punjab. He was the first from our country in a thousand years to reverse the situation of intrusion back into the countries of India's conventional conquerors, the Pashtuns (Afghans). His reign extended from the Khyber Pass in the northwest to the Sutlej River in the east, and from Kashmir, the Indian subcontinent's northernmost region, toward the south to the Thar (Great Indian) Desert. Punjab state is the main state which had crushed Afghanistan. Ranjit Singh was accounted to be visually impaired in one eye. He was the lone offspring of Maha Singh, and after his dad's demise, he turned into the Shukerchakias' boss at 12 years old which was a Sikh gathering. Gujranwala town and the encompassing towns, presently in Pakistan, were part of the heritage.



Most regal families in India were more forward and modern in their way of life and living than most Indians. The ladies of the royal residences frequently looked into artistic expression, culture, and social work. They became benefactors and epicureans of the best arts and made the ideal hostess for important guests at the Palace — which included everybody, from the American President to the Queen. 



FAQs



Q1. Who was the first person to use the title “Maharani”?



At a focal intersection in Kolhapur is the sculpture of a lady on a horse, with a sword. This is Rani Tarabai, the daughter-in-law of Shivaji and a dauntless and powerful sovereign. Rani Tarabai was the spouse of Rajaram, Shivaji's child from his second wife Soyrabai. She was the primary Indian sovereign to utilize the title "Maharani".



Q2. Do Maharajas with opulent lifestyles still exist?


Maharajas still exist in India, namely-


  1. Rana Sriji Arvind Singh Mewar is the 76th Maharaja of the Mewar tradition. The family claims legacy inns, resorts, and magnanimous establishments across Rajasthan and has an aggregate staff of  1,200 individuals to run them.


  2. Yaduveera Krishnadatta Chamaraja Wadiyar is the current Maharaja of Mysore. It is said that the family has properties and resources of up to Rs. 10,000 crore.


  3. The sixteenth scion of the sovereignty of Alsisar, Abhimanyu Singh is as of now the Maharaja of his family and is also called the Raja of Khetri. Under the family name, he has a haveli in Jaipur and Ranthambore. In addition, he is likewise the sponsor of a yearly EDM celebration, Magnetic Fields.