Radha-Krishna Within The Body Of a Fish

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The undying image of Radha-Krishna’s togetherness is a favourite with makers of devotional art. The painting you see on this page depicts the amorous couple within the body of a matsya (fish), queen of the waters. The tribhanga murari is, of course, playing on the flute, His body jutting laterally in three different places (shoulders, hips, and ankles). His beloved Radha is an integral aspect of His muralidhar iconography. She is situated right next to Him as She dances with abandon in His proximity, swayed by His divine music.

Madhubani paintings are the hallmark of the region’s (present-day Mithila) folk art. Developed by homebound women seeking to beautify their dwellings, it is usually done on an organic canvas with homemade vegetable-based dyes. Note the limited yet vibrant colour palette of this painting and the sheer proportion of detail despite the rudimentary techniques of traditional Madhubani painting.

The fish, within which lie the gorgeously dressed couple, is a richly adorned one. It is wrapped in delicate pink silks that float about it as it swims. Its scales and mouth are dyed with vermillion, indicative of its being a bridal fish. Hints of lace at the gills and the tail. Note the simplistic yet powerful brushstrokes that make up the lifelike waters of the surrounding.

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Item Code: DN87
Artist: Hira Devi
Specifications:
Madhubani Painting on Hand Made PaperFolk Painting from the Village of Madhubani (Bihar)Artist: Hira Devi
Dimensions 19.5 inches X 27 inches
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
100% Made in India
100% Made in India
Fair trade
Fair trade

Colors of Tradition: Exploring the Artistry Behind Madhubani Paintings

Madhubani painting is also known as Mithila art as it is practiced in the Mithila region of India and Nepal. It has specifically originated from the Madhubani district of the state of Bihar. Traditionally, the women of this region created these paintings and in recent years, it has become a widely practiced art and has now become renowned throughout the world. This art expresses the creativity and culture of the people of Mithila and is passed from one generation to another. In this way, the heritage of Madhubani art has been preserved for many decades. The subjects of these paintings are usually religion, love, and fertility. Sometimes, social events like festivals, weddings, and royal court are also depicted in the paintings. The most commonly painted designs and themes are the forms of Hindu Gods and Goddesses such as Ganesha, Shiva, Saraswati, Lakshmi, Krishna, and Ram. The characteristic features of Madhubani paintings are their vibrant colors and eye-catching geometrical patterns. The empty spaces are filled with traditional motifs such as floral and foliate patterns, animals, birds, geometrical structures, and other designs. The local artists create these paintings using a variety of items such as matchsticks, twigs, brushes, pens, or even their own fingers. The paints are usually made with natural dyes and pigments.
As simple as it may seem, the making process of the world-famous Madhubani paintings is certainly not easy and requires lots of hard labor.
Traditional Madhubani paintings are done either on cloth, handmade paper, or canvas. Select the medium of painting as per your choice. If you have chosen cloth, attach it to cardboard to make a solid base. The making of the painting begins with making a double-lined border. This is a very important step because the border is filled with various geographical shapes and patterns or other motifs. The average width of the border is 1.5 - 2 cm. Now that the border is created, you will be left with a blank middle space. This is the main workspace. Start drawing your choice of figure, designs, and shapes. These must be relevant to the Madhubani painting themes.
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When the key design has been made, the empty spaces in between are filled with some designs.
Now is the time to color the painting using vivid shades and hues. Colors in Madhubani are sourced from nature; Indigo is used to produce blue, flower juice produces red, turmeric gives yellow, leaves produce green, cow dung mixed soot gives black, and rice powder gives white.
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To paint these colors, the artist uses a bamboo stick and wraps cotton around it. This acts as a traditional brush.
The entire painting is now painted using this special brush with natural vibrant colors. · However, in modern times, the common brush is used and instead of natural colors, artists prefer to use acrylic paints.
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Since the entire painting is made with natural materials and colors, it appears simple yet enriching. Originally, this art was created on mud walls or soil grounds but when it evolved over many years, the people of Madhubani started to make it on fabric and paper. Today, this art has become globalized and is receiving worldwide attention and appreciation.
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