Ganesha, The Drummer

Ganesha, The Drummer

$325
Item Code: ZC46
Specifications:
Wood Sculpture
17 inch Height x 9 inch Width X 7 inch Depth
2.90 kg
This wooden icon of the young Lord Ganesha represents him as the pupil drummer who is yet in the process of acquiring proficiency in the art of drum-playing. It seems to be his first public appearance and is hence allowed to join the band with one drum instead of the usual two. This amounts to both, an ordeal requiring him to produce with one drum all that usually the two of them do and as much a concession as he has to manage just one of them. The conscious pupil has wide writ on his face grave tension, which inflates the upper part of his trunk and makes his eyes further sink in their sockets. The disciplined chap is too conscious in putting on his forehead a prominent 'tripunda' mark. In confusion he seems to have forgotten his usual 'modaka'.

It has been a practice since long that master artists, both vocalists and instrumentalists, when invited for a prestigious performance, took with them any of their promising disciples and allowed him to perform with his learner's instrument and skill. The sculptor of this wooden piece, well acquainted with this practice, has included this pupil form of the instrumentalist Ganesha for giving a realistic touch to his mythological rendering, which is the very gist of folk art-view.

This moderately clad and ordinarily bejewelled cute figure of Lord Ganesha is worthy of both, a shrine and a drawing-hall. Wood is ordinarily a tough medium, but the artist has created out of it an excellent piece of art which is simply superb in facial expressions, bodily proportions, depiction of action and an over-all elegance. Lord Ganesha is sitting like a professional holding the drum between his legs and belly. Instead of looking at his drum he has his gaze fixed on the presiding Lord for knowing his reaction to his performance. This depicts his confidence and it is with such self confidence and contentment that he is playing upon his instrument spontaneously and detached from the world around. The vermilion complexioned deity teems with energy and radiates with labour. This description by Prof. P.C. Jain and Dr Daljeet. Prof. Jain specializes on the aesthetics of ancient Indian literature. Dr Daljeet is the chief curator of the Visual Arts Gallery at the National Museum of India, New Delhi. They have both collaborated on numerous books on Indian art and culture.

Other Sculptures in this Series:

Ganesha, The Master-Drummer

Ganesha, The Lyrist

His Majesty Lord Ganesha

Click Here to read the Article: Ganesha - the Elephant Headed God, Art and Mythology

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