11" Lord Indra from Nepal

11" Lord Indra from Nepal

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$1030

Every year in the eleventh month of the Nepalese lunar calendar, the capital of Nepal Kathmandu celebrates the festival of Indra Jatra- a festival based on processions (Jatra) named after Indra, the lord of heavens and the bestower of enriching rains. According to the local legends, Indra dressed as a common farmer and descended on earth to collect the beautiful Parijata (Night Jasmine) flower. 

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Item Code: WSA061
Specifications:
Copper
11 inch Height X 5.5 inch Width
2.90 kg
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
Fair trade
Fair trade

. During his quest, he was caught by the city folks who mistook him for a thief. Upon the interference of his mother, the earth goddess Vasundhara or Basundhara, the people realized their mistake and released him immediately. Content with the freedom of his son, the earth goddess rewarded the residents of Nepal by giving them the boon of an abundance of winter dew, for the nourishment of their crops. Owing to this event, besides being the protector of the Buddha and king of gods, Indra is also worshipped as the giver of agricultural wealth.

 

Here we have the great Indra or Shakra/Shaka as called in Buddhism, visualized as the master of the Trayastimsa heaven (one of the seven heavens), seated in the regal Maharajalila posture. The thunderbolt or Vajra in his right hand besides being one of his attributes as the bringer of rains and storms is a vital Buddhist symbol for the inactive, male potency of the universe. His left hand, resting on the ground holds the stylistically delineated stalk of a lotus flower. The most striking feature of this glistening copper Indra is his quintessentially Nepalese jewellery. The embossed jewels in the loveliest pink and green hues in the tiara-like crown, necklaces, armbands, bracelets, and waistband recreate the ornamentation of the custodian of all of the heavens’ wealth. A deific serenity flows from the visage of Indra, which is composed and introspective in appearance. A stunning jewel in the centre of the forehead of the Devaraja- the king (raja) of all gods (devas) is a great use of embellishment in order to convey essential philosophical lessons. The jewel or Mani symbolizes the third eye- an attribute shared by those who have achieved the greatest wisdom. The glimmer of the jewel replicates the radiance that emerges from an enlightened mind. 

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