Subscribe for Newsletters and Discounts
Be the first to receive our thoughtfully written
religious articles and product discounts.
Your interests (Optional)
This will help us make recommendations and send discounts and sale information at times.
By registering, you may receive account related information, our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
.
By subscribing, you will receive our email newsletters and product updates, no more than twice a month. All emails will be sent by Exotic India using the email address info@exoticindia.com.

Please read our Privacy Policy for details.
|6
Sign In  |  Sign up
Your Cart (0)
Best Deals
Share our website with your friends.
Email this page to a friend
Books > History > East Meets West > At Home in Diaspora (South Asian Scholars and The West)
Subscribe to our newsletter and discounts
At Home in Diaspora (South Asian Scholars and The West)
Pages from the book
At Home in Diaspora (South Asian Scholars and The West)
Look Inside the Book
Description
Back of The Book

An increasing internationalization in the structure of research and academic institutions in the West has been accompanied by much greater visibility for Third World scholars in the ‘developed’ world.

This book, comprising a blend of autobiography and intellectual history by some South Asia’s foremost contemporary historians and sociologists, shows that the postcolonial scholar’s presence in the West is a phenomenon worthy of analysis. In particular, the questions asked here relate to the impact of the intellectual diaspora on research, both in the West and in South Asia.

While showing how the intervention of scholars of South Asian descent in western academic institutions has reconstituted the debate on post colonialism, imperialism, globalisation, capitalism, and national traditions, this book is entertaining, informative, and thought-provoking about the whole history of South Asia’s scholarly transactions with the West.

 

Introduction

Some dichotomies have enjoyed as great a vogue in academic circles as in popular wisdom: those between ‘East’ and ‘West’, between Europe and Asia or Africa, between ‘the West’ and ‘the Rest’ – ‘North’ and ‘South’ as the current idiom currently has it. Yet our present insights, thanks to archaeologists, epigraphists, philologists, historians, and (more recently) anthropologists, can no longer afford us any excuse for believing in the historical existence of any such cultural complexes that supposedly confront each other eye to eye without any admixture or inter- mingling, like separate islands in an archipelago. Not only has the 'frontier' between 'the West' and 'the Rest' of the world always been a shifting one, but the images and ideas, the practices and discourses that were encompassed by these labels have differed profoundly over time and from one country to another, from one society to another. They have depended on regional and national, social and cultural belonging, as well as on a variety of standpoints adopted here and there by merchants, travellers, missionaries, soldiers, administrators, settlers and the various different strata of indigenous societies.

There is no straightforward opposition between the so-called 'East' and 'West', but a hierarchical relation of multiple powers and modes of subordination that is more often than not a construct of Western ethnocentricity, inspired by the belief in a fundamental difference between distinct types of religions, races, humanities. Such differences have been linked to a geopolitical confrontation between unequally balanced powers that dates back long before the century of colonial conquest, and in which colonialism itself was a particular historical stage of development (and non-development). Contrary to Kipling's assertion, and that of so many others during the period of colonisation, 'East' and 'West' first met up with each other a very long time ago.

This is not to say that the world is an unbroken landscape. Our purpose is not to suggest that there has been a continual and undifferentiated intermingling of these cartographic imaginaries: far from it. Varied scholars have sought to specify and demarcate with some precision the contours of these direct and indirect en- counters between 'the West' and 'the non-West', and such a field of enquiry has now become a sizeable trend in the academe. Studies by Francois Hartog, Anthony Pagden, Nathan Wachtel, Serge Gruzinski, Tzvetan Todorov, Steven Greenblatt, Marshall Sahlins, Fred Cooper, Greg Dening, Tom Holt, Nick Thomas, Michel- Rolph Trouillot, Ann Stoler, to name but a few, offer rich and imaginative, interrelated and overlapping attempts at making sense of the process of interaction and appropriation, acculturation and hybridisation, collaboration and resistance which resulted from encounters that took place in almost every conceivable epoch and region. These approaches can be subsumed under three rubrics: those mostly interested in the issue of 'representation', images and cross-gazes that various cultures manufacture of one another across space and time, whether synchronically or diachronically; those that deal with 'contact', the twilight zone where dialogues and ex- changes take place, and the ensuing multiple ways of accepting, misunderstanding and rejecting the Other. Lastly, those that ad- dress the issue of colonisation of imagination, body and mind, as well as of colonial cultures-material and non-material-in relation to the social fabric. These colonial cultures appear as specific producers of power and violence, the latter forces being at work in postcolonial societies even today, while assuming different forms through 'North-South' relations.

These three approaches are by no means mutually exclusive. Rather, they may overlap with one another and/or feed on each other. Work inspired by them has significantly contributed to documenting earlier multiple processes of' globalisation'. As is well known, this kind of worldwide phenomenon is not a recent ones there have been several waves of globalisation (as well as’ de-globalisation’) in world history. From the sixteenth century onwards, each of these has been accompanied by particular type of exchange and migration, accommodation, narration, negotiation and resistance.

 

Contents

 

  Acknowledgements vii
  Contributors ix
  Introduction: At Home in Diaspora--South Asia, Europe, and America 1
1 Knowledge, Circulation and Collective Biography 28
2 My Place in the Global Republic of Letters 44
3 Off-centre: Feminism and South Asian Studies in the Dispora 52
4 Crossing Borders and Boundaries 66
5 Representing Rural India 77
6 De-ghettoising the Histories of the Non-West 91
7 Journey to the East, by the West 101
8 The Locationa of Scholarship 115
9 Globalisation, Democratisation and the Evacuation of History? 127
10 On the Advantages of Being a Barbarian 148
11 The Ones Who Stayed Behind 163
12 My Brothers' Keeper 178
13 Recasting Women in the Publising World 197

Sample Pages



At Home in Diaspora (South Asian Scholars and The West)

Item Code:
NAK478
Cover:
Paperback
Edition:
2006
Publisher:
ISBN:
8178241676
Language:
English
Size:
8.0 inch X 5.0 inch
Pages:
217
Other Details:
Weight of the BooK: 214 gms
Price:
$25.00   Shipping Free
Look Inside the Book
Add to Wishlist
Send as e-card
Send as free online greeting card
At Home in Diaspora (South Asian Scholars and The West)

Verify the characters on the left

From:
Edit     
You will be informed as and when your card is viewed. Please note that your card will be active in the system for 30 days.

Viewed 2260 times since 2nd Apr, 2015
Back of The Book

An increasing internationalization in the structure of research and academic institutions in the West has been accompanied by much greater visibility for Third World scholars in the ‘developed’ world.

This book, comprising a blend of autobiography and intellectual history by some South Asia’s foremost contemporary historians and sociologists, shows that the postcolonial scholar’s presence in the West is a phenomenon worthy of analysis. In particular, the questions asked here relate to the impact of the intellectual diaspora on research, both in the West and in South Asia.

While showing how the intervention of scholars of South Asian descent in western academic institutions has reconstituted the debate on post colonialism, imperialism, globalisation, capitalism, and national traditions, this book is entertaining, informative, and thought-provoking about the whole history of South Asia’s scholarly transactions with the West.

 

Introduction

Some dichotomies have enjoyed as great a vogue in academic circles as in popular wisdom: those between ‘East’ and ‘West’, between Europe and Asia or Africa, between ‘the West’ and ‘the Rest’ – ‘North’ and ‘South’ as the current idiom currently has it. Yet our present insights, thanks to archaeologists, epigraphists, philologists, historians, and (more recently) anthropologists, can no longer afford us any excuse for believing in the historical existence of any such cultural complexes that supposedly confront each other eye to eye without any admixture or inter- mingling, like separate islands in an archipelago. Not only has the 'frontier' between 'the West' and 'the Rest' of the world always been a shifting one, but the images and ideas, the practices and discourses that were encompassed by these labels have differed profoundly over time and from one country to another, from one society to another. They have depended on regional and national, social and cultural belonging, as well as on a variety of standpoints adopted here and there by merchants, travellers, missionaries, soldiers, administrators, settlers and the various different strata of indigenous societies.

There is no straightforward opposition between the so-called 'East' and 'West', but a hierarchical relation of multiple powers and modes of subordination that is more often than not a construct of Western ethnocentricity, inspired by the belief in a fundamental difference between distinct types of religions, races, humanities. Such differences have been linked to a geopolitical confrontation between unequally balanced powers that dates back long before the century of colonial conquest, and in which colonialism itself was a particular historical stage of development (and non-development). Contrary to Kipling's assertion, and that of so many others during the period of colonisation, 'East' and 'West' first met up with each other a very long time ago.

This is not to say that the world is an unbroken landscape. Our purpose is not to suggest that there has been a continual and undifferentiated intermingling of these cartographic imaginaries: far from it. Varied scholars have sought to specify and demarcate with some precision the contours of these direct and indirect en- counters between 'the West' and 'the non-West', and such a field of enquiry has now become a sizeable trend in the academe. Studies by Francois Hartog, Anthony Pagden, Nathan Wachtel, Serge Gruzinski, Tzvetan Todorov, Steven Greenblatt, Marshall Sahlins, Fred Cooper, Greg Dening, Tom Holt, Nick Thomas, Michel- Rolph Trouillot, Ann Stoler, to name but a few, offer rich and imaginative, interrelated and overlapping attempts at making sense of the process of interaction and appropriation, acculturation and hybridisation, collaboration and resistance which resulted from encounters that took place in almost every conceivable epoch and region. These approaches can be subsumed under three rubrics: those mostly interested in the issue of 'representation', images and cross-gazes that various cultures manufacture of one another across space and time, whether synchronically or diachronically; those that deal with 'contact', the twilight zone where dialogues and ex- changes take place, and the ensuing multiple ways of accepting, misunderstanding and rejecting the Other. Lastly, those that ad- dress the issue of colonisation of imagination, body and mind, as well as of colonial cultures-material and non-material-in relation to the social fabric. These colonial cultures appear as specific producers of power and violence, the latter forces being at work in postcolonial societies even today, while assuming different forms through 'North-South' relations.

These three approaches are by no means mutually exclusive. Rather, they may overlap with one another and/or feed on each other. Work inspired by them has significantly contributed to documenting earlier multiple processes of' globalisation'. As is well known, this kind of worldwide phenomenon is not a recent ones there have been several waves of globalisation (as well as’ de-globalisation’) in world history. From the sixteenth century onwards, each of these has been accompanied by particular type of exchange and migration, accommodation, narration, negotiation and resistance.

 

Contents

 

  Acknowledgements vii
  Contributors ix
  Introduction: At Home in Diaspora--South Asia, Europe, and America 1
1 Knowledge, Circulation and Collective Biography 28
2 My Place in the Global Republic of Letters 44
3 Off-centre: Feminism and South Asian Studies in the Dispora 52
4 Crossing Borders and Boundaries 66
5 Representing Rural India 77
6 De-ghettoising the Histories of the Non-West 91
7 Journey to the East, by the West 101
8 The Locationa of Scholarship 115
9 Globalisation, Democratisation and the Evacuation of History? 127
10 On the Advantages of Being a Barbarian 148
11 The Ones Who Stayed Behind 163
12 My Brothers' Keeper 178
13 Recasting Women in the Publising World 197

Sample Pages



Post a Comment
 
Post Review
Post a Query
For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy
Based on your browsing history
Loading... Please wait

Items Related to At Home in Diaspora (South Asian Scholars and The West) (History | Books)

At Home In Diaspora: South Asian Scholars And The West
Item Code: IDE193
$33.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Telugu Diaspora Through The Ages (From the Earliest Times)
by P. Chenna Reddy
Hardcover (Edition: 2017)
B.R. Publishing Corporation
Item Code: NAN063
$70.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Indian Diaspora in the Caribbean (History, Culture and Identity)
by Rattan Lal Hangloo
Paperback (Edition: 2015)
Primus Books
Item Code: NAM035
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Diversities in The Indian Diaspora (Nature, Implications, Responses)
by N. Jayaram
Paperback (Edition: 2012)
Oxford University Press
Item Code: NAF872
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Voices of The Indian Diaspora
Item Code: IDJ341
$30.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Culinary Fiction: Food in South Asian Diasporic Culture
Item Code: NAF132
$35.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
THE SINDHI DIASPORA (1860-2000)
by MARK-ANTHONY FALZON
Hardcover (Edition: 2005)
Oxford University Press
Item Code: IDG028
$49.50
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Jains in India and Abroad (A Sociological Introduction)
Item Code: NAL559
$25.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Africa’s Islamic Experienc (History, Culture and Politics)
by Various Authors
Hardcover (Edition: 2009)
Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
Item Code: NAF666
$55.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Sikhs At Large (Religion Culture and Politics In Global Perspective)
by Verne A. Dusenbery
Hardcover (Edition: 2008)
Oxford
Item Code: IDK568
$40.00
Add to Cart
Buy Now
Testimonials
Exotic India has the best selection of Hindu/Buddhist Gods and Goddesses in sculptures and books of anywhere I know.
Michael, USA
Namaste, I received my package today. My compliments for your prompt delivery. The skirts I ordered are absolutely beautiful! Excellent tailoring and the fit is great. I will be ordering from you again. Best Regards.
Eileen
I’ve received the package 2 days ago. The painting is as beautiful as I whished! I’m very interesting in history, art and culture of India and I’m studing his civilization; so I’ve visited Rajasthan, Gujarat, Tamil Nadu and Kerala in theese years. I’m a draftwoman , so I like collect works of extraordinary arts and crafts of villages, that must be protected and helped. In a short time I’ll buy some others folk painting, as Madhubani , Kalamkari and – if it’s possible – Phad. In the meanwhile, I’m very happy to have in my home a work of your great artist. Namaste, Namaskara.
Laura, Italy.
I must compliment you on timely delivery for this order. I was very impressed. Consequently, I have just placed another large order of beads and look forward to receiving these on time as well.
Charis, India
Bonjour, je viens de recevoir ma statue tête de Bouddha en cuivre. elle est magnifique et correspond exactement à la photo. Emballage très épais et protecteur, arrivé intact. Délai de livraison de 8 jours, parfait. Votre service commercial est très réactif et courtois. Je suis donc très satisfait et je tiens à le dire. Merci.
Yves, France
I was thrilled with the Tribal Treasure Box. Your customer service is outstanding. Shopping with you is like being back in India.
Yvonne, USA
I feel so blessed. Thank you for your wonderful service.
Vimala, USA
I appreciate your wonderful service to the yoga community. The Kali Dance of Victory statue and Lord Ganesha Granting Abhaya statue together will go toward a fundraiser for Yoga Life Society's Peace Sanctuary known as Sanctuary of Universal Light.
Vicki, USA
Thankyou Vipin. We LOVE Exotic India!!!! Jay Jay Sita Ram!!! Warm wishes, Jai राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम राम
Jai, USa
Fast and reliable service.
Dharma Rao, Canada
TRUSTe
Language:
Currency:
All rights reserved. Copyright 2018 © Exotic India