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Literary Criticism of Kuvalayamala

Literary Criticism of Kuvalayamala
$30.00
Item Code: NAZ438
Author: Jolly Sandesara
Publisher: Parshwanath Vidyapeeth, Varanasi
Language: English and Sanskrit
Edition: 2019
ISBN: 818675991
Pages: 303
Cover: HARDCOVER
Other Details: 9.00 X 6.00 inch
weight of the book: 0.56 kg
About the Book
From the book Prakrit literature runs side by side the Sanskrit literature. If we look at the glamour; we shall realize their long time co-relation, for example: the works of Kalidasa in Sanskrit and those of Hala in Prakrit, the preaching of Lord Buddha and Lord Mahavira and the prescription of Prakrit in Sanskrit plays, the Upanisads in Sanskrit and inscriptions in Prakrit, Setubandha of Pravarasena and Kadambari of Banabhatta and so on and so forth. But the Prakrit ornate poetry was not reviewed critically by critics of ancient and modern age. `Kuvalayamala of Uddyotanasuri (8. century AD) has the same fate to display though it is impregnated with all that is required to obtain the prestigious place in literature. The period of the author of the Kuvalayamala - Uddyotanasuri is the same in which Bharavi, Bana, Bhavabhuti etc. lived but their works are highly esteemed whereas Kuvalayamala is deprived of that. As and when we entered it, we come across a number of embellishments, merits, suggestive senses, implied senses, miraculous events, super natural elements and so on. These are what we find in Kadambari of Banabhatta. Kadambari is read by so many students and scholars where as Kuvalayamala has scarcity of readers. This is the reason, I tempted to work on the literary evaluation so as to bring out all the literary elements that are hidden and play vital role in beautifying it.

About the Author
Dr. Jolly Sandesara did her M.A. in Prakrit in 2013 and Ph. D. in 2018 from Gujarat University. She has got sevaral articles published in different Indian Journals of repute. She has been serving at Jaina School of Shri Shantinagar Jain Pathashala since 20 years. She has worked on various academic projects as Palm leaf manuscripts, Dhatvadesa in Siddhahemagabdanushasana and on Literary Criticism of the Kuvalaymala. She has expertise in editing of various scripts as Brahmi, sarada, Devanagari, etc. She has a good command over Hemacandra's grammar-Siddhahemagabdanushasana. She has attended sevarl conferences and workshops in India.

Foreword
The study of Prakrit languages and literatures in India needs to be encouraged and new research on this rich heritage has to be produced. Thus reading a piece of work such as that of Dr. Mrs. Jolly Sandesara can only be a matter of great pleasure. Those who stimulated her, namely Prof. Dinanath Sharma and his colleagues at the Department of Pali and Prakrit, Gujarat University, Ahmedabad, have also to be thanked. As the author rightly remarks at the start, Sanskrit literary chefsd' oeuvrehave continuously been the focus of examination in the light of Indian poetics. But, in contrast, their Prakrit counterparts in Maharastri or Jaina Maharastri appear to have been rather neglected. There could hardly be a better choice than Uddyotanasuri' sKuvalayamalato fill a regrettable lacuna and to embark upon such a mission as this campu composed in 779 C.E. is an achievement and even a prowess in terms of literary construction, style, composition of characters and dialogues, description, handling of meters, alamkaras, languages and proficiency in gastric knowledge pertaining to all possible fields. Whatever is known about the author has been recapitulated by Dr. Sandesara, but, as rightly stated by her, what is more important is how Uddyotanasari emerges as an outstanding literary personality through the unique work of his that has come to us. The Kuvalayamala was not widely read even by Uddyotanasari's Indian posterity (with the exception of Ratnaprabhasari who wrote a Sanskrit trans creation of the Prakrit version), and has not given birth to any commentary that would have proceeded with the literary analysis of the work in Indian terms, explaining the difference between literal and non-literal meaning, identifying alamkaras or characterizing the rasas at work. This is what Dr. Sandesara’s book does systematically in its core chapters, applying the Indian categories of literary analysis to Uddyotanasuri's scampu. The catalogue of the alamkara section could have been supplemented at several places by a true analysis. There are members of Uddyotanasuri’s fan-club outside India, who have worked on the Kuvalayamal5too. The author of these lines wrote articles on little known Sastras such as dhatuvada, nidhisastra or riddles, or on sandastayamaka, as used by Uddyotanasuri. Readers, especially those who are not fully conversant with the often difficult language of Uddyotanasuri, will have to refer to Prof. Christine Chojnacki's English translation (Bangalore, Sapna Book House, 2018, vol. 2), as well as to the important companion literary studies (vol. 1). Dr. Sandesara's detailed English narration of the work (chapter 3) is extremely useful, but in most cases she extensively quotes Prakrit original passages (sometimes rather long) without providing any translation. As it is, Dr. Sandesara's study is a commendable and honest attempt at a careful reading, which she clearly enjoyed and which, hopefully, will stimulate other young Indian scholars to courageously tackle understudied Prakrit works, not omitting to take into account, though, whatever contribution is available outside India. As far as possible, research in our fields has to be international.

Preface
It was almost a difficult task for me to do research on the Literary Criticism of the Kuvalayamala, a huge narrative work in Prakrit by Uddyotanasuri. But when I passed out my M. A. with distinction, I was motivated to go ahead-for Ph. D. by my teacher Prof. Dinanath Sharma. He suggested me this topic but looking to my capacity, I was not much confident to work on it. But at the same time, I had zeal within to do something new. Prof. Sharma boosted me with energy and I started working. After the completion of the Ph. D., he suggested me for its publication for such works are rare in Prakrit narrative literature. On my request he edited the thesis also. I extend my sincere and heartfelt gratitude to Prof. Dinanath Sharma, my supervisor without whose inspiration this work could not have seen the light of the day.

I approached Parshwanath Vidyapeeth, Varanasi for its publication. I am very thankful to the authorities of Parshwanath Vidyapeeth for allowing this work for publication. My thanks are also due to Dr. Shriprakash Pandey, Joint Director, Parshwanath Vidyapeeth who went through the whole manuscript and made required corrections in order to make this publication perfect. I am also thankful to Dr. O. P. Singh for managing printing of this book through the press. For nice printing we are thankful to The Mahavira Press, Varanasi.

Introduction
It is seen among most of the Prakrit scholars, if not among all of them, that they do not show much interest in estimating literary value of Prakrit works. If we calculate the number of Prakrit works and compare with that of Sanskrit works, the Prakrit literature will stand higher than that but since most of the Sanskrit works of all forms have been studied critically from literary point of view; they are read, studied and referred to by the scholars world-wide. The works of Kalidasa contains two epics, three dramas and two partial poetries. Banabhatta, Bhavabhuti, Dandi, Bharavii, Visakhadatta, Sri Harsa are some of the shining poets whose works have been enjoyed by students and scholars ever since they were created. Poets use the words as striking devices. They make us enjoy by the same words, we use in our behavior-

Poets use the words, we do. They utilize the same sense, we mean. But by specific creation with the same words and senses, they entertain the whole word.

The poetry without suggestion is not poetry as such. The best quality of poetic creation is valued by the suggestive meaning it has.

This (poetry) in which suggestive sense is superior to the primary sense being called the Dhvani by scholars is the best poetry.

The soul of the poetry is Dhvani. This has been conveniently accepted and reiterated from time to time by the thinkers of the past. But there are some scholars who deny the existence of it and some say that Dhvani is another name of Laksana and some scholars are there who admit the Dhvani to be something that cannot be the subject to speech. This is the reason that I endeavor to define Dhvani for the enjoyment of experienced a trained people.

This suggestive meaning was 'established by Anandavardhana with great effort. He was opposed by his contemporary rhetoricians. Then he argued that one can hypothesis the absence of Dhvani because it has never been discussed or identified by former acaryas.

Had there been that the things or limbs, that are inside the body would be exposed out of body, people would always be busy in eliminating dogs and crows with sticks.

As regards Prakrit literature, it runs side by side the Sanskrit literature, if we look at the glamour; we shall realize their long time co-relation, for example: the works of Kalidasa in Sanskrit and those of Hala in Prakrit, the prching of Lord Buddha and Lord Mahavira and the prescription of Prakrit in Sanskrit plays, the Upanisads in Sanskrit and inscriptions in Prakrit, Setubandha of Pravarasena and Kadambari of Banabhatta and so on and so forth. But the Prakrit ornate poetry was not reviewed critically by critics of ancient and modern age. Kuvalayamala of Uddyotanasuri (8th century AD) has the same fate to display though it is impregnated with all that is required to obtain the prestigious place in literature. The period of the author of the Kuvalayamala - Uddyotanasuri is the same in which Bharavi, Bana, Bhavabhuti etc. lived but their

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