Kali the Terrible

$85
Item Code: DA84
Specifications:
Madhubani Painting On Handmade Paper
Dimensions 29.5" x 11.0"
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
100% Made in India
100% Made in India
Fair trade
Fair trade
The myths and legends prevalent among the indigenous people form an important factor in the Madhubani (Mithila) art. These stimulate dramatic intensity resulting in distortion and exaggeration and the use of strongly contrasting colors. Maithalas are deeply religious.The influence of goddess Kali
has been quite predominant ion the tradition of Tantra which has greatly influenced their character, and it is these traditions that have found adequate expression in the paintings of Mithila.

Consort of Shiva, and considered the incarnation of his energy, Kali is the terrible goddess of time, that destroys all existence.Her terrible countenance gives us a glimpse of the extent of her powers of annihilation. The great goddess of Tantrism, Kali, is depicted with her tongue sticking out making a mockery of the ignorance of us humans. She also wears a garland of human skulls to flaunt the fact of her own supreme and universal being. Kali here kills the demon Mahishasura. In the two corollary depictions on either side is the same subject again of the benevolent slaying the malevolent. Kali, in different forms, using different weapons, different means to the same end - destruction of evil. The painter does not seek to place objects of figures in a natural relation to each other. What he wishes to express, he does so very well. The look of terror in the eyes of the demons counter the gentle look in the eyes of the terrible goddess, suggesting that she is also the benevolent mother who aids man in his struggle with his own animal instincts.

The colors used are bright, with a liberal use of yellow and orange. Every shape is enclosed in a black outline, making the image sharp and brilliant.

This description by Renu Rana.

Colors of Tradition: Exploring the Artistry Behind Madhubani Paintings

Madhubani painting is also known as Mithila art as it is practiced in the Mithila region of India and Nepal. It has specifically originated from the Madhubani district of the state of Bihar. Traditionally, the women of this region created these paintings and in recent years, it has become a widely practiced art and has now become renowned throughout the world. This art expresses the creativity and culture of the people of Mithila and is passed from one generation to another. In this way, the heritage of Madhubani art has been preserved for many decades.

The subjects of these paintings are usually religion, love, and fertility. Sometimes, social events like festivals, weddings, and royal court are also depicted in the paintings. The most commonly painted designs and themes are the forms of Hindu Gods and Goddesses such as Ganesha, Shiva, Saraswati, Lakshmi, Krishna, and Ram. The characteristic features of Madhubani paintings are their vibrant colors and eye-catching geometrical patterns. The empty spaces are filled with traditional motifs such as floral and foliate patterns, animals, birds, geometrical structures, and other designs. The local artists create these paintings using a variety of items such as matchsticks, twigs, brushes, pens, or even their own fingers. The paints are usually made with natural dyes and pigments.

As simple as it may seem, the making process of the world-famous Madhubani paintings is certainly not easy and requires lots of hard labor.

Traditional Madhubani paintings are done either on cloth, handmade paper, or canvas. Select the medium of painting as per your choice. If you have chosen cloth, attach it to cardboard to make a solid base.

The making of the painting begins with making a double-lined border. This is a very important step because the border is filled with various geographical shapes and patterns or other motifs. The average width of the border is 1.5 - 2 cm.

Now that the border is created, you will be left with a blank middle space. This is the main workspace. Start drawing your choice of figure, designs, and shapes. These must be relevant to the Madhubani painting themes.

Image
Image

When the key design has been made, the empty spaces in between are filled with some designs.

Now is the time to color the painting using vivid shades and hues. Colors in Madhubani are sourced from nature; Indigo is used to produce blue, flower juice produces red, turmeric gives yellow, leaves produce green, cow dung mixed soot gives black, and rice powder gives white.

Image

To paint these colors, the artist uses a bamboo stick and wraps cotton around it. This acts as a traditional brush.

Image

The entire painting is now painted using this special brush with natural vibrant colors. · However, in modern times, the common brush is used and instead of natural colors, artists prefer to use acrylic paints.

Since the entire painting is made with natural materials and colors, it appears simple yet enriching. Originally, this art was created on mud walls or soil grounds but when it evolved over many years, the people of Madhubani started to make it on fabric and paper. Today, this art has become globalized and is receiving worldwide attention and appreciation.

Add a review
Have A Question

For privacy concerns, please view our Privacy Policy