Rainbow Padmasambhava: A Source of Strength and Inspiration for Devotees

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Great skill is employed in the making of thangka painting. The great art of thangka was kept in the family. We have a few great Thangka in India. Exotic India excel and outreach Tibetan artists for your collectable finds. Many colour schemes are used in the depiction of Padmasambhava. The eighth manifestation of Padmasambhava points to the initiations that the great guru himself had to undergo. He meditated and theorized for a long time. The second Buddha by the Nyingma order practised tantric rites so that he kept reaching a higher level in his development. He is sitting on a lotus that is springing up in a small lake, is wrapped in heavy, expensive, pastel robes, and wears a hat with its earflaps is topped by eagle feathers to show his spiritual flight. He has a vajra in his right hand and khatvanga clamped against his left shoulder. Khatvanga is a club in Vajrayana Buddhism it became a magic staff used in rituals as a symbol of the highest degree of enlightenment and perfection. On his forehead, the wrinkles of a frown indicate the hidden wrathfulness that comes to light on exorcising and overpowering demonic forces. Padmasambhava was a successor in expelling the Bön religion. Padmasambhava put into practice one of the essential elements of Tantrism, namely that negative powers and attributes should not be destroyed, but remodelled by adaption into salutary powers. Padmasambhava is considered to have been at the basis of Nyingmapa, the “Order of Elders.”

To keep the canvas from unravelling, the edges are folded over twice rather than hemmed. The canvas is stitched to four fabrics, which are held in place by four weaved frames. This polychrome painting is a lovely piece if you want to cleanse and ultimately remove negative obscuration, 

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Item Code: TR41
Specifications:
Tibetan Thangka Painting
Size of Painted Surface 15 inches X 19.5 inchesSize with Brocade 31 inches X 44 inches
Handmade
Handmade
Free delivery
Free delivery
Fully insured
Fully insured
100% Made in India
100% Made in India
Fair trade
Fair trade
The rainbow is eternity's expression of delight. It cannot but be auspicious, even if it portends the demise of a great master. For such a master now merged into 'clear light' (prabhasvara) of the death process where the most subtle level of mind is experienced as pristine inner radiance, there is no sense of 'leaving behind', the notion of self and others having been transcended. For the 'others', the disciples or students, there is inevitably a great sense of loss and grief. Yet the miracle of the master's departing rainbow will always remain as a great source of strength and inspiration for the devotees.

The vaulting arc of the rainbow is known as 'Indra's bow',(Indradhanush), one of the weapons of the ancient Vedic sky god, Indra. The seven colours of the rainbow are red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet on the inside. When a double rainbow occurs, the order of colours in the second rainbow is reversed. On rare occasions, a similar rainbow effect is created by the moon's light at night, producing a silver 'moonbow' on the opposite side of the sky. A circular rainbow known as 'glory', can sometimes be seen from high vantage points, such as hazy mountain summits, forming an aureole halo ring of rainbow light. In Tibetan art, the rainbow takes on a more supernatural manifestation. The divine forms of deities manifest and dissolve into emptiness just as a rainbow appears and vanishes into the sky. Rainbows in Tibetan art arise from sacred places or objects, expanding outwards as they twist and interweave with other rainbows or horizontal cloudbanks. They originate from a point and eventually dissolve into space, like winding rivers of light. A miraculous phenomenon in the Tibetan tradition is the taking of the 'rainbow body' at the time of death. This miraculous sign of realization is known as the 'body of light'. When a great master has attained the realization of Mahamudra, the world is no longer perceived as a conceptual concrete dimension. Sine all appearance has transformed into the ultimate nature of reality itself as the fully enlightened 'body' of the Buddha (dharmakaya), permeating space with no solidity or separation. When the notion of an individual self has dissolved, leaving no residue of an intermediary 'I' between unmanifest consciousness and the appearance of a physical universe as light, the physical body is likewise perceived as merely an appearance of light. Such a master will leave instructions that his body should remain undisturbed for a period of days after his death. During this period rainbow emanates from the place where his body rests, as his consciousness remains absorbed in the state of 'clear light'. When the miraculous rainbows have ceased, all that remains of the master's bodily form are his clothes, hair, his fingernails and toenails. Tibetan folklore ascribes various omens to the appearance of rainbows. At the end of every rainbow is believed to be a wish-fulfilling jewel. A rainbow at night is believed to be an ominous sign. White rainbow symbolizes, the death of a yogin. A rainbow around the sun is usually caused by ice crystals, but in Tibet, it is seen as an omen of the birth or death of a great teacher.

One of the most frequently painted forms of rainbow-body emanation is that of Padmasambhava, a great Buddhist teacher and tantric master. When Padmasambhava is represented as manifesting on the dharmakaya, sambhogakaya, and nirmanakaya level simultaneously, then three rainbow sources emanates from his crown, forehead and heart centres, respectively. These three rainbow streams merge together very subtly to produce a harmonious triple whirl-pool of rainbow waves. As finely depicted in this thangka.

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